Police Briefs 06-13-2019

By Seth Daniel and Paul Koolloian


Missing Child Reunited with Parents

On June 4, Chelsea Police reunited a missing 10-year-old Chelsea girl with her parents on after the Kelly school student told officers she fell asleep on the MBTA bus she takes home from school. The juvenile told officers she ended up at the Maverick Square MBTA station where she became confused and proceeded onto another MBTA bus that she was unfamiliar with. At some point, she left the bus in the area of North Shore Road in Revere where she began to walk on the busy road. During this time, the parents responded to the police station to report their daughter missing. Officers used the young girl’s cell phone to “ping” her location in Revere. While Chelsea, Transit and Revere Police were searching the area the young girl was located by an MBTA bus driver who transported her to the Wonderland “T” Station in Revere. She was then reunited back with her parents at Chelsea Police Headquarters. Chelsea officers are working with the parents and the school in addressing future transportation options for the young girl who was unharmed in the incident.

Struggle Without a Shirt

On May 27, at 1:20 a.m., officers responded to the area 176 Clark Ave. for a report of a disturbance. The report to officers was that witnesses were reporting they saw a male who appeared drunk, with no t-shirt on, fighting with a female who was preventing him from getting into the home. Officers struggled with the male in attempting to calm him down. After a struggle to restrain him, he was placed into custody. The male was transported to CHA Everett for evaluation prior to being booked at CPD.

Eber Orantes, 33, of 176 Clark Ave., was charged with disorderly conduct, assault with a dangerous weapon and resisting arrest.

Threated With Strange Weapon

On May 30, at 9:20 p.m., officers responded in the area of Normandy Road at Garfield Avenue for a report of a road rage incident involving a firearm. Officers were given the description of the vehicle in question. It was said to be a black Honda Accord operating on Normandy Road. CPD officers located the vehicle and found the subject to have a modified instrument that resembled a firearm. The victim in the other vehicle provided other information that led to the male being arrested.

Tanvir Zahir, 21, of Stoneham, was charged with violating the motor vehicle ordinance, violating the dangerous weapons ordinance, and two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

Swallowed Bag of Crack

On May 31, at 9:30 a.m., Officers observed a male party known to them from previous drug offenses walking with an unknown male on Chestnut Street near Fourth Street. The officers believed they then witnessed a drug transaction between the two. The subject admitted he swallowed a bag of “crack “ when he was approached by the officers. A search of his person uncovered more drugs and he was placed under arrest. The second male was identified and placed under arrest on the scene. The subject who ingested the narcotics was transported to CHA Everett for evaluation.

Argenis Felipe, 33, of East Boston, was charged with possession to distribute a Class B drug (crack), conspiracy, and distribution of a Class B drug.

Box Cutter

On May 31, at 11 a.m., officers were dispatched to the parking lot of 260 Clark Ave. for a fight in progress. Officers observed two tenants of the building in an argument. One tenant accused the second of threatening him with a box cutter. That item was retrieved and that male was taken into custody.

Jody Robinson, 59, of 260 Clark Ave., was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

Swerved at Pedestrian

On June 1, at 9:10 a.m., an off-duty CPD officer was traveling on Hawthorne Street towards Chester Avenue when he saw a male party crossing the street. The officer noticed a Toyota Corolla laying on his horn and then began to intentionally drive towards the male party that was crossing the road. The victim had to jump four to six feet to his rear to avoid being struck by the vehicle.

The officer believed the operator swerved in his direction deliberately trying to strike the victim, which could have resulted in serious injuries. CPD officers responded to assist and the male operator was placed in custody for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Eduardo Garcia, 35, of East Boston, was charged with failing to slow, reckless operation, and assault with a dangerous weapon (car).

MS-13 Member Sentenced for Unlawful Possession of a Firearm

An MS-13 member was sentenced last week for being an illegal alien in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Nery Rodriguez Diaz, 19, a Salvadoran national who resided in Chelsea, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV to 14 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Diaz will also be subject to deportation proceedings upon completion of his sentence.

On May 22, 2018, Diaz and another MS-13 member, Elmer Alfaro Hercules, were arrested in possession of loaded firearms in Bremen Street Park in East Boston, a location where numerous MS-13 gang members have been observed and where gang-on-gang violence frequently occurs.

The investigation revealed that Diaz and Hercules each separately and unlawfully entered the United States in 2014 as unaccompanied minors. Both Diaz and Hercules were charged federally for being aliens in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Hercules previously pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 13 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Hercules will also be subject to deportation proceedings after the completion of his sentence.

Chelsea Gang Leader Sentenced to Over 15 years in Prison

A leader of the East Side Money Gang (ESMG) was sentenced last week in federal court in Boston on racketeering, drug trafficking and firearms trafficking charges.

Angel “Stackz” Mejia Zelaya, 24, of Chelsea, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Richard G. Stearns to 188 months in prison and five years of supervised release. In January 2019, Mejia pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, commonly known as RICO, one count of conspiracy to distribute cocaine and cocaine base, and one count of engaging in the business of dealing in firearms without a license.

Mejia was a leader in the ESMG, a violent, Chelsea-based street gang, which was responsible for various violent crimes, including multiple shootings, and drug distribution in Chelsea and surrounding communities. Mejia, as well as other members and associates of the gang, were also actively involved in illegally selling firearms, including handguns and shotguns, in and around Chelsea.

Mejia participated in multiple, gang-related shootings.

On July 5, 2015, Mejia was involved in a shooting targeting a rival gang member on a public street in Chelsea, which did not result in the rival gang member being injured. On March 29, 2016, Mejia and his lieutenant, Josue “Superbad” Rodriguez, agreed to provide a .22 caliber revolver to a third ESMG member, Brandon “Big Baby” Baez, so that Baez could “spank” with it – meaning that he could use it against rivals of ESMG. On April 3, 2016, in Revere, Baez used the revolver to attempt to murder two men believed to be members/associates of a rival gang as they sat in a vehicle. Both men were wounded, but not killed. Baez called Mejia immediately after the shooting to inform Mejia that Baez had just shot two men. Mejia further admitted to supplying other ESMG gang members with firearms, including a juvenile who then accidently shot another person.

While Mejia was the leader of the ESMG, the gang dealt substantial quantities of drugs, including cocaine and cocaine base (crack), in Chelsea and surrounding communities. Mejia was responsible for the distribution of at least a kilogram of cocaine base. Mejia and his gang subordinates stored drugs at and distributed drugs from a residence on Tudor Street in Chelsea and another residence in the Chelsea area. The gang kept handguns at both locations to protect their drug operations, as well as for other gang activities.

The prosecution of Mejia arose out of an investigation of various street gangs, including the 18th Street Gang, ESMG and the Boylston Street Gang, which were responsible for fueling a gun and drug pipeline across a number of cities and towns in eastern Massachusetts. During the course of the investigation, more than 70 firearms were seized.

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Congratulations, Brian Sullivan

We have been remiss for not having offered our congratulations to Chelsea native Brian Sullivan upon his recent appointment by Gov. Charlie Baker, and subsequent confirmation by the Governor’s Council, to the position of Clerk-Magistrate of the Lynn District Court.

Brian’s ascension to the clerk-magistrate’s position culminates a long career in the court system that began as a Probation Officer in the Chelsea District Court in 1986. He became an assistant clerk-magistrate in that court and then the Salem District Court before being named the Acting Clerk Magistrate of the Cambridge District Court prior to his appointment to the Lynn District Court.

Brian is a Chelsea guy through-and-through. His dad, the late Vincent Sullivan, who was the long-time Assistant Commandant of the Chelsea Soldiers Home, and his mom, Eleanor, raised their four children in the Mill Hill section of the city, where they were one of the most-respected families in Chelsea.

Brian attended St. Rose grammar school before going on to Malden Catholic and Northeastern University. He was a member of the Chelsea Knights of Columbus and was well-known as a member of the K of C’s softball team in the heyday of the Chelsea Modified Fast Pitch Softball League when that league drew huge crowds to Highland Park in the early 1980s.

Brian married the former Paula Hansbury, who also is a Chelsea native and well-known Chelsea High grad, and they have raised their family in Swampscott.

If we were writing this column in another era, it might have been titled, “Local boy makes good.” We know we speak for all of those who have been friends and acquaintances of Brian Sullivan and his family through the years in offering our congratulations to Brian upon his appointment and in wishing him continued success in his outstanding career in the Massachusetts judicial system.

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Speaker Deleo Prepares for the Future

Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo this week unveiled the details of the plan he announced last February that will provide $1.3 billion to combat the ever-increasing effects of climate change. Among the major aspects of the plan will be the awarding of grants to cities and towns across the state to encourage green energy initiatives and climate change resiliency efforts, which are particularly needed for our vulnerable coastal communities.

The grant program, called GreenWorks, would be funded by $1 billion in bonds and paid out over a decade. The program, to be run by the state Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, will allow local governments to seek grants for a variety of projects that will focus on climate change preparedness and clean energy production in order to reduce carbon emissions.

The bill also would set aside an additional $295 million in state spending for energy infrastructure, including $100 million for municipal microgrid systems to increase the resiliency of the electricity grid and $125 million for electric vehicles in municipal fleets and regional transit authorities.

There no longer is any dispute that climate change is occurring and that our coastal communities, including the City of Boston, are ill-prepared at the present time to address the twin threats of rising sea levels and more powerful storms.

Speaker DeLeo’s GreenWorks initiative represents a major step forward in protecting our vulnerable coastline, while at the same time creating jobs in the green energy and clean tech industries.

Given the urgency and pressing need to address the issue of climate change, which is occurring at an ever-accelerating pace, we urge our state senators to join with Speaker DeLeo and the Mass. House in presenting a bill for Gov. Charlie Baker’s signature by the end of this year.

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Celebrate Our Rivers in June

By: Julia Blatt, Executive Director, Massachusetts Rivers Alliance

At long last, a recent weekend presented one of those pristine days that remind us here in Massachusetts why we endure those winters. With warm spring weather finally here, many of us hit the water for the first time this year, visiting local rivers. With more than 10,000 miles of rivers traversing the state, we had many choices. Sail boats blossomed on the Charles. Rowers huffed and puffed on the Mystic. Fishing rods sprouted along the Swift. Bikers and kayakers explored the Sudbury. For many people, the beautiful day meant a chance to spend on, in and around the rivers of Massachusetts.

Fittingly, June is National Rivers Month, a 30-day gala celebrating our waterways. Whether you kayak past important Revolutionary War sites on the Concord River, hike over the Bridge of Flowers on the Deerfield, draw water for local crops from the Connecticut, or depend on drinking water from the Merrimack, National Rivers Month is a time to celebrate the gains we have made in protecting these important public recreational, economic and historic assets.

National Rivers Month, however, is also a time to reflect on what remains to be accomplished. The Massachusetts Rivers Alliance, the voice for Massachusetts rivers, is a statewide environmental advocacy non-profit that helps those whose lives are touched by these Massachusetts waterways (and we would argue, that’s all of us). Consider, for example, pending legislation regarding sewage overflows around the state. Very old stormwater and wastewater systems serving municipalities in the state have what are called “combined sewage overflow” (CSO) systems. Through these CSOs, stormwater and wastewater systems are physically interconnected. At times of high precipitation, stormwater run-off goes into the wastewater system and overwhelms the water treatment plants. To prevent these backups, wastewater – the sewage from your homes and businesses – is dumped directly into Massachusetts rivers. Approximately 200 of these CSO connections exist throughout the state. In Massachusetts, an estimated three billion gallons of raw sewage gets dumped into the state’s rivers each year. Swimmers, canoeists, and pets exposed to CSO contaminants are vulnerable to gastroenteritis, respiratory infections, eye or ear infections, skin rashes, hepatitis and other diseases. Children, the elderly, and people with suppressed immune systems are especially vulnerable. Wildlife are also adversely affected by CSO pollutants which lead to higher water temperatures, increased turbidity, toxins and reduced oxygen levels in the water.

Everyone recognizes the problem. But it takes money to fix it, more money than is now available. Over the past two decades, Massachusetts communities have spent more than $1 billion to eliminate CSOs. The federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates, however, that an additional $4.2 billion is needed to finish the job.

In addition to supporting efforts to increase state and federal funding to eliminate CSOs, Mass Rivers is championing a simple sewage notification bill now pending before the Massachusetts legislature. Disturbingly, there is currently no state requirement to notify the public about the presence of sewage in the water when these discharges occur.

The legislation supported by Mass Rivers would require the operator of a CSO to notify local boards of health, in addition to the state Department of Public Health, within two hours after a sewage spill begins. In addition, the public could sign up to receive these notifications, by text, e-mail, phone call or tweet. The state Department of Environmental Protection would be required to centralize all sewage spill data and make it available on the internet. Signage would be required at all public access points (for boating, fishing, beaches) near CSO outfalls as well.

National Rivers Month is a time to shake off those indoor blues and enjoy Massachusetts’

bounty of rivers. Whether you go to look for great blue herons, to fish for trout, to take your family and the dog on an afternoon paddling adventure, or simply to seek calm and quiet, our state’s rivers are there for you. To preserve these friends, and to ensure the safety of those who use our rivers, National Rivers Month should also be a time for towns and cities to insist that our legislators enact a requirement that when the waters are despoiled with sewage spills, we know about it.

Julia Blatt is Executive Director of the Massachusetts Rivers Alliance, the voice of Massachusetts rivers. The Alliance is a statewide organization of 77 environmental organizations in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

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Obituaries 06-13-2019

Santo Agri

US Army veteran of World War II

Santo A. “Sam” Agri passed away Thursday morning, June 6 at

the Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home surrounded by his loving family. He was 95 years old. Born in East Boston, the son of the late Giuseppe and Josephine (Astorino) Agri, Sam grew up in Revere and attended Revere public schools. He enlisted in the US Army on July 26, 1943 and served almost a year and a half overseas, including Western Germany, Rome and Southern France. Corporal Agri was honorably discharged on December 12, 1946, receiving the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

Upon returning home from the service, Sam opened an aluminum siding business with his brother. He owned the business for many years before he began working at the Naval Ship Yard in Charlestown. As a carpenter by trade, Sam worked on the USS Constitution while employed at the Naval Ship Yard.

Sam and his beloved wife of 68 years, the late Theresa R. (Bellino) Agri, were long time Chelsea residents.

Sam and his wife had a passion for dancing. They would travel all over to dance. A few of their favorite spots included the Chelsea Polish Club, Polcari’s, and the Cathay Pacific Restaurant in Quincy.

Sam adored his large family and loved spending time with all of his grandchildren and great grandchildren. He will be greatly missed by all his family.

Sam was the devoted father of Joseph M. Agri of Florida, Janice J. Christoforo and her husband, John of Holbrook, Joan Ramage and her husband, Joseph of Avon and Joyce Agri and her husband, Stephen Thomas of Malden. Sam was pre-deceased by 13 brothers and sisters. He is also lovingly survived by six grandchildren: John and Matthew Christoforo, Dominic and Andrea Taverna and Eddie and Theresa Klosiewicz and four great grandchildren, Julia, Nicholas, Jimmy and Thomas Christoforo.

Sam’s Funeral Mass was celebrated on Saturday, June 8 at Our Lady of Grace Church in Chelsea. Interment with Military Honors concluded the service at Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the Carafa Family Funeral Home in Chelsea.

Luis Garcia Maldonado

Nov. 30, 1958 – June 8, 2019

Luis Garcia Maldonado passed away Saturday morning, June 8 at the Whidden Memorial Hospital in Everett after a brief illness.

He was born in Progreso, Yoro, Honduras into the family of the late Amelia Maldonado-Perez and Luis García-Robles. He received his formal education in Honduras. He married Lelis Carcamo and, with his young family, came to the United States, settled in Chelsea and for a brief time moved to Texas before returning to Chelsea some 25 years ago.

Luis supported his family working as a marina laborer. He was employed for many years in the shipyard of Boston Towing and Transportation, maintaining their fleet of tugboats and barges. A hard worker and devoted family man, in his spare time Luis enjoyed home gardening, time with family and friends, cooking, socializing and traveling to Honduras to visit with family.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Lelis Carcamo and was the devoted father of Gina Flores and her husband, Jose of Lynn, Karla Carcamo and Leslie García, both of Chelsea and Heidy García of Progreso-Yoro, Honduras. He was the cherished grandfather of Evelin Esteban, Cindi Flores, Laura Flores, Elizabeth Alacaron and Joshua Alacaron; dear brother of Carminda García-Maldonado, Elvia García-Maldonado, Mercedes García-Maldonado, Humberto García-Maldonado, Paulino García-Maldonado and Famelisia García-Maldonado. He is also survived by many great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, extended family members and friends.

Family and friends are invited to visit at the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea today, Thursday, June 13 from 3 to 8 p.m. His funeral will begin from the Welsh Funeral home on Friday, June 14 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Rose Church, 600 Broadway Chelsea at 10 a.m. Services will conclude with interment, location to be announced. Funeral home fully handicap accessible, ample parking opposite funeral home.

Daniel Mikolajewski

Decorated veteran and GE retiree

Daniel Mikolajewski of Chelsea died on May 11.

Danny was born in December of 1946, the youngest of four children and was a lifelong resident of Chelsea. Raised on Beacon Street, he spent his youth at St. Stanislaus School. He attended Everett Vocational for printing and worked odd jobs during and after high school until he enlisted in the United States Army in September of 1966 and was stationed in Vietnam during the war. It was during those three years of service that he fought for the peace of others and the safety of his comrades. Within the three years of being in Vietnam fighting the battle, it was because of his courage, dedication and bravery that Danny was awarded The National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal , 3 Bronze Stars for Meritorious Achievement, The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal and The Combat Infantryman Badge.

In 1969, he was honorably discharged and off to start a new chapter in his life. It was at this time he met his beloved friend of 50 years and wife of 48 years, Betty.

Danny worked for Lawson Machinery and Tool for some time until he secured a job as a helicopter engine tester for General Electric in Lynn, where he worked for 37 years until his retirement.

Danny was a former longtime member of the Polish Falcons of Chelsea and attended Patriots games as a season ticket holder before they started to win. He was an avid bowler on multiple teams at Townline in Malden and, in his remaining years, he spent time as a member and avid cribbage player at the Polish Political Club of Chelsea.

He was the beloved husband of Elizabeth “Betty” (Gubski) Mikolajewski, devoted father of Kristin Beth (Mikolajewski) Breen and her husband, Joseph of Quincy and Daniel Mikolajewski, Jr. and his wife, Siobhan of Norwood; brother of Geraldine Douglas and her husband, Arthur of Lynnfield and the late Edward Miles and his surviving wife, Joyce Miles of Wilmington and Wallace Miles; brother-in law of Sr. Barbara Ann Gubski, SND of Chelsea; cherished grandfather of Madeline Adele Breen, Evelyn Claire Breen and Fiona-Maggie Mikolajewski.

In 1976 Danny became a father, first came the birth of their daughter Kristin Beth and six years later in 1982 son Daniel Jr was born. Both of which he was very proud. He became a father once again with the addition of his son-in-law, Joe and daughter-in-law, Siobhan to the family. But the most recent of happy times in his life for the past eight years was his three beautiful grandchildren, Maddie, Evie and Fiona-Maggie. Never a time went by when he didn’t crack a smile or belt a laugh because they brought him pure joy in that moment of time.

Danny’s lengthy illness with cancer called him home on May 11, 2019. He passed with the one true constant in his life of 50 years by his side his best friend and beloved wife.

A Celebration of Life was held on Sunday, June 2 in the Smith Funeral Home, 125 Washington Avenue, Chelsea. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial contributions be made to the Leonard Florence Center for the Living, 165 Captains Row, Chelsea, MA 02150 or to the American Cancer Society, 3 Speen St., Suite 250, Framingham, MA 01701 or to Exceptional Citizens Week at Camp Fatima atwww.ecweek.org/donate.

Sonya Cannon

Of Everett, formerly of Chelsea

Sonya J. (Senna) Cannon of Everett, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 6.

She was the beloved wife of the late Thomas., mother of Ronald M. and his wife, Jodi A. of Pelham, NH, sister of Ronald F. Senna of Everett and is also survived by two grandchildren, Mackenzie M. and Thomas J., one niece, Suzanne Senna, and one nephew, Sean Senna.

Funeral arrangements were by the Salvatore Rocco & Sons Funeral Home, 331 Main St., Everett. Interment was in the Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For more information: 1-877-71-ROCCO or roccofuneralhomes.com

James Lanzillo

Member of Chelsea Knights of Columbus

James A. Lanzillo, of Revere, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 4.

During his working years, he was employed as a supervisor of maintenance for an apartment complex. A member of the Chelsea Knights of Columbus # 83 and was active in the Explorer Post # 109. A lover of Revere Beach, he especially enjoyed flying kites there.

He was the devoted son of the late Richard and Ruth (Perry) Lanzillo, longtime companion of the late Tara Tormay, beloved brother of Richard Lanzillo of Florida, Robert Lanzillo and his wife, Cathy of Saugus, Paul Lanzillo and his wife, Debbie of Saugus and Denise Domelowicz of Peabody. He is also lovingly survived by many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews as well as his canine companions, Lucy, Rocco and Cassie.

At his request, all services will be private.

To leave a message of condolence for Jim’s family, please visit www.smithfuneralhomes.com

Giuseppe Colucciello

Of North Reading, formerly of Chelsea

Giuseppe Colucciello of North Reading, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 8.

He was the beloved husband of the late Assunta (Savignano), cherished father of Luigi Colucciello and his wife, Kathleen of Chelsea, dear brother of Michelina, Juigi and Angelo, all of Italy and the late Camille and Carmela and adoring grandfather of Tia and Nicholas.

His funeral will be from the Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno Funeral Home, 128 Revere St, Revere on Friday, June 14 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Anthony’s Church at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited. A visitation will be held today, Thursday, June 13 from 4 to 8 p.m. Interment will be at Woodlawn Cemetery. For guest book, please visit www.Buonfiglio.com

Carmen Jimenez

Caring and loving person who will be remembered for her keen wit and sense of humor

Carmen Jimenez passed away early Tuesday morning in the peaceful surroundings of Chelsea home after battling cancer over the past few years. She was 47 years old.

Born and raised in Olancho, Honduras, she was one of nine children born to the late Juan Jimenez and Angela Herrera. She came to Chelsea as a young lady bearing and raising her own three children here. Carmen worked in the produce department at Demoulas in Wilmington for past 20 years.

Carmen enjoyed playing bingo, music and dancing and she will forever be remembered for her keen wit and sense

of humor, always the loving and caring person who loved entertaining family and friends.

To mourn her passing and cherish her memory, she leaves her beloved children: Mislean Zelaya of Revere, Michelle Cruz and Angel Zelaya, both of Chelsea, her sister and housemate, Gladys Herrera. She was the cherished grandmother of Emanuel, Franklin, Liam and Skyla Zelaya.

Relatives and friends are most kindly invited to attend visiting hours at the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea on Friday, June 14 from 4 to 8 p.m. The funeral home is fully handicap accessible, ample parking opposite funeral home.

Her burial be held later next week in Honduras at the Central Cemetery in Armis, Olancho. For directions or to send expressions of sympathy, please visit: www.WelshFuneralHome.com

Anthony Memorial – Frank A. Welsh & Sons, Chelsea, 617-889-2723

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Chelsea Night Market Inaugural Event Planned for June 8

How much awesomeness can be contained within Luther Place?

The people of Chelsea will soon find out as the first of a series of five monthly events takes place downtown on Saturday, June 8, with the launch of the Chelsea Night Market.

Presented by the City of Chelsea through its downtown initiative called Chelsea Prospers and local events production company Jukebox, the Chelsea Night Market is an ambitious undertaking for a hidden corner of the downtown that’s beginning to awaken.

Last year, GreenRoots took the lead in the block’s transformation by creating a colorful mural with Chelsea artist and one of the state’s top muralists Silvia López Chavez on the Chelsea Walk.

That pedestrian walkway provides the entrance to the next phase of the effort with activation of the space through the Chelsea Night Market.

Edwardo Chacon of Jukebox said, “Vendors are still being accepted for future markets and there’s always room for more artists and performers to join in. Our priority is to engage as much local talent as possible. We’re excited by all the energy growing around the market and the new connections we’re making. This is going to be epic.”

Here, in the large parking lot on Cherry Street behind the businesses on Broadway between Fourth and Fifth Streets, event visitors every month will find the area transformed with activity and something new to discover on each visit.

More than a dozen booths will feature local businesses, artists, merchants and community groups. Merchandise includes both new, vintage, thrift and handcrafted items.

Jack’s Men’s Shop will highlight emerging brands for men’s fashion, while Allen’s Cut Rate features a selection of high-quality fragrances. You’ll find hand-crafted jewelry by Beaded Inspiration and Sacred Soul Fire. Over at the booths for Dandelion District and High Energy Vintage there’s a variety of vintage items including old school video games, nicnacks and clothing.

At Jukebox’s booth, show off your local pride with swag that shouts your love of all things 02150. Among the offerings are T-shirts and totes emblazoned with Chelsea. All proceeds are dedicated to supporting the next projects to improve Luther Place.

A variety of other tents will feature community groups and artists.

Test your aim with Archery Games Boston, show off what you’re proud of with the Chelsea LGBTQ Coalition, and play around with the team from the Phoenix Charter Academy Chelsea.

Several local restaurants are on board with menus of street food as well.

Get a sandwich hot off the grill from the chefs of Broadway House of Pizza, nibble savory Chinese food from Chung Wah, or sink your teeth into an empanada from Pan y Café.

On the main stage a variety of performers will entertain the crowd.

MC for the night is comedian and actor Chase Abel. Host of the podcast “Ready Set Blow” with Randy V, he’s a regular at Boston’s top clubs.

Among them is a band headed by Bengisu and Tuzcu.

It’s impossible to describe their mix of Turkish-funk-rock, but it will definitely get a groove going.

DJ Tempo Sauve’s upbeat house electronica is gathering a strong following, and he’ll keep the energy going throughout the night. There’s a rumor some comedians from the recent show at Tu Casa may stop by too.

The performance highlight, however, undoubtedly will be the crew from the Boston Circus Guild. They’ll be roaming among the crowd to show off their amazing skills and costumes and then at 9:30 p.m., will take the stage for a 20-minute fire performance that will top off the night.

Serving as a backdrop to the main stage and to provide a tangible reminder of the market through the summer, the wall of 456 Broadway will serve as space for temporary mini murals with new designs appearing each month by local artists.

The Chelsea Night Market team is grateful for the support of the Chelsea Record as a media sponsor helping them to spread the word about the upcoming event and to highlight the new happenings of downtown Chelsea.

For additional information check out the Chelsea Night Market’s website at www.chelseanightmarket.com, the facebook event at https://www.facebook.com/events/529915294079626/ or contact at Mimi Graney, at mgraney@chelseama.gov

Future dates include:

•July 13 (raindate 7/20)

•August 10 (raindate 8/17)

•September 21 (raindate 9/28)

•October 5 (raindate 10/12)

CITY OF CHELSEA, MA

Department of Planning and Development

City Hall, 500 Broadway, Room 301 · Chelsea, MA 02150

Phone: 617.555.1708 · Fax: 617.658.6725 · Email: deptemail@chelseama.gov

CITY OF CHELSEA, MA

Department of Planning and Development

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Council Passes $181.5 Million City Budget with Reservations

The City Council passed a nearly $181.5 million City Budget for Fiscal Year 2020 Monday night, but not without some dire warnings about the financial future of the City by a few of the councillors.

The $181,486,465 budget passed by an 8-3 vote, with Councillors Damali Vidot, Joe Perlatonda, and Robert Bishop voting against the 3.7 percent increase over the FY19 budget. The School Department’s $95.4 million commitment comprises the largest chunk of the budget.

The Council also approved the Water and Sewer Enterprise accounts for FY20, bringing total City appropriations to around $205 million, but the water and sewer accounts are paid through the water and sewer rates, not taxation.

Several attempts were made to cut money from the budget Monday night, but with the exception of a $1,300 cut in the Emergency Management department budget, none of those efforts garnered a majority.

Among those failed efforts was one by Vidot to cut salary lines in the police, fire, and planning budgets.

Vidot proposed the $80,000 cut to the planning budget, $50,000 to the police, and $100,000 to the fire last year as well, citing a top heavy administrative budgeting in the Police and Fire departments, and her displeasure with the way the Downtown Coordinator position in the Planning Department has panned out.

One of the biggest issues, Vidot said, is that the Downtown Coordinator has not been properly involved with the small, local businesses in the city.

“We have to think about the future of this city, and (the position) is leaving out a huge part of Chelsea,” said Vidot.

Perlatonda said he couldn’t agree with an effort to cut $80,000 from the planning budget when the Council didn’t take action to cut millions of dollars from the Department of Public Works budget.

Perlatonda made his own amendments looking for the cuts in the DPW budget, which would have effectively ended a request by City Manager Thomas Ambrosino to have the DPW oversee a new City Water and Sewer Department, rather than contracting for the services.

Those amendments also failed.

Councillor-At-Large Roy Avellaneda also voted against the cuts to the planning budget, noting several recent city-wide events that have brought hundreds of people to the downtown area.

Vidot noted that her amendment was not a personal attack on anyone, but added that City events would more appropriately be funded in the Recreation Department budget.

In casting his vote against the overall $181.5 million, Bishop said the constant increases in City spending are unsustainable.

“Last year, I voted against the budget because it was unsustainable,” said Bishop. “This year, it is even more unsustainable … this can’t continue. It’s no surprise to everyone that I usually oppose certain spending.

“I’m against a lot of spending because I think it is not spent wisely,” he continued. “When is this going to end? I hope I am not around when the bottom falls out, because it is going to fall.”

District 6 Councillor Giovanni Recupero voted for the budget, but said the City needs to seriously heed Bishop’s warning, noting that other large cities in Massachusetts such as Springfield and Lawrence have seen the economic bottom fall out.

“It can happen anywhere, … and then we will have to start laying people off,” said Recupero. “We only have 1.8 square miles in the city, how much can you grow in our city?

“I am going to vote for the budget because it is the right thing to do now, but like Mr. Bishop said, we have to beware of the future, because the future is not too far away,” he continued.

Perlatonda said that the budget is rising without the City doing enough to help its poorer residents through things like tax and water and sewer rate breaks.

“When is it going to end?” he said. “This budget needs to be stopped at some point.”

District 8 Councillor Calvin Brown said the councillors have gone through a long budget process with ample chance to make amendments or address their concerns to Ambrosino.

“I believe this budget is solid, well thought out, and well supported,” Brown said. “I know the investment we are making today is sound.”

Avellaneda voted to approve the budget, but said it is the first time he has ever given serious pause to voting in favor of a budget.

“What I have seen during the last year with the budget process is that I don’t think we are doing enough during budget season,” he said.

Avellaneda said there should have been more debate about, and more information provided about, the proposed change to the control of the Water and Sewer Department.

He also noted that the budget will have to be paid for in October, when the Council sets the City tax rate.

When that time comes around, Avellaneda said he will have questions for the City’s Assessing Department, which he said has been doing a “terrible job” capturing the true value of many larger properties in Chelsea.

“Across the board, there are many, many, many buildings, and these are large landlords, that are not paying their due in this community,” Avellaneda said.

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Councillors Want Guarantee on Soundproofing for Massport Money

District 6 Councillor Giovanni Recupero doesn’t like some of the noise he is hearing about a proposed Massport-funded soundproofing program.

Earlier this spring, Recupero and Councillor-At-Large Roy Avellaneda proposed that the City use $300,000 of the $600,000 annual Massport mitigation payment to help provide soundproof windows for residents who deal with the whoosh of jets traveling to and from Logan Airport.

But a letter from City Manager Thomas Ambrosino to the City Council states it might not be that easy to automatically earmark those funds for a soundproofing program.

“I am not opposed to creating some local grant program, operated through our Planning Department, to provide funding for soundproofing to residents adversely impacted by airport related noise,” Ambrosino stated. “Deciding who should qualify for such grants, and how to prioritize areas of the City, might be a bit challenging. But, I feel with some time, we can work out those details together in collaboration with the City Council.”

But Ambrosino said the funding proposed by the Council is problematic, since the annual mitigation payment cannot be directly used for a specific program. The payment is considered a payment in lieu of taxes by the state’s revenue department, making it a general revenue source that is deposited into the City’s general fund.

“If the Council desires to depend upon this Massport payment to help fund a soundproofing program at the level of $300,000 annually, it must appropriate the $300,000 separately,” Ambrosino stated. “It can do that either in an annual Budget line item, or as an isolated appropriation from a source such as Stabilization or Free Cash.”

Ambrosino recommended the City commit to appropriating $300,000 for the soundproofing program from Free Cash whenever it is available, rather than making it a permanent part of the budget.

“I can see what the City Manager is saying, but this money comes to us direct from Massport, we get it all the time, so why do we have to wait and put it in free cash?” Recupero asked. “What kind of guarantee can the City Manager give us? I want the City Manager to give us some kind of guarantee that the money will be used for that purpose, not all of it, but a piece of it.”

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Thousands Report to Work at Encore Boston Harbor

Monday marked the biggest day to date for Encore Boston Harbor and its crew of 4,800 employees as they reported to work at the resort site for the first time, and existing employees and the executive team moved into offices at the Encore tower.

After many job fairs, interviews, discussions and trainings, approximately 4,800 active employees were brought on board at the new Encore Boston Harbor resort casino site on Monday, June 3 – the first day that work began in earnest at the $2.2 billion resort, which opens June 23.

It also marked the first day for existing workers and the executive to move out of their long-time offices at Station Landing and into offices at the resort tower.

From shuttle drivers to blackjack dealers to employee cafeteria chefs to Encore President Bob DeSalvio, most everyone with a job to do at Encore was on site Monday.

“On Monday, we were able to move into the resort,” said President Bob DeSalvio. “We now have 4,800 incredibly excited and enthusiastic employees preparing to receive our guests. This is truly a magical time in the building, as employees embark on new careers that positively impact not only their lives but also their families. I’m seeing a lot of smiling faces this week.”

Employees have been busy getting acclimated to their jobs for the past few weeks, training in massive conferences off-site in local venues and in Boston function halls. Monday marked the first day they could begin training onsite, getting their uniforms from the state-of-the-art clothing check system.

To date, Encore representatives said they have brought on 4,800 employees, but they are not yet finished.

They still have offers out to another 700 employees, and are looking to employee another 300 employees. That number includes dealers and others throughout the organization.

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Sun-Shining Moment CHS Graduation Heads Outdoors for 2019

The story of the Chelsea High Class of 2019 won’t be complete with just a rundown of what happened in the hallways of the high school.

In fact, it’s what this class did at City Hall, on social media and in rooms with powerful decision makers that will define the 312 seniors who will walk across the stage on Sunday to collect their diplomas and celebrate a journey concluded.

Workers on Monday began cobbling together more than 20,000 hard plastic squares over the new Chelsea Stadium turf field to protect it for the first outdoor graduation in many years. The new situation was a hard-fought win for the Class of 2019, and will likely define them for years to come, school officials said. Graduation takes place at 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 9.

That story starts and ends with having graduation under what (hopefully) will be bright blue skies and sunshine – as the class celebrates their year-long fight to get graduation back outdoors and open up the celebration to many more family members.

will be bright blue skies and sunshine – as the class celebrates their year-long fight to get graduation back outdoors and open up the celebration to many more family members.

Principal Alexander Mathews said the class is very accomplished academically, socially and athletically, but it has taken an extra step of moving outside the school and advocating in the community.

“It’s a class that more than any I’ve seen is driven to show leadership in a way that feels organized and professional,” he said. “I’ve been really, really impressed with what I’ve seen at Chelsea High this year – even in the face of discord among the adults at times…They remained calm and serious even when so much was happening around them. It’s a very community-minded ethic in the group. They are genuinely of a belief that what they’re doing is best for the community and not necessarily their families only. They believe they are doing this for the future of the other classes behind them. That’s pretty impressive in a teenaged mind.”

The Class of 2019 decided early on that they wanted to be able to graduate outside, and it wasn’t just to get some sun.

In fact, since the graduation moved into the indoor gym, many family members have been excluded from the ceremony due to space reasons. With larger classes and larger families, many parents found they had to go and watch the graduation on a telecast in the cafeteria.

Students in the Class of 2019 didn’t think it was right and fought back against that.

“In some cases, relatives traveled hundreds or thousands of miles to be there, but weren’t able to be with the family in the gym,” said Mathews.

It seemed like an attainable goal, but then they ran into the red tape of consumer affairs.

That came in the form of the warranty of the brand new turf field at the Stadium where graduation would take place. That warranty would be void, City officials learned, if the graduation were held on the field without and protections in place.

And those protections cost nearly $200,000.

School officials and City officials seemingly told the class members that it was a good effort, but couldn’t be done.

Leaders like President Jocelyn Poste and activist Manuel Teshe would not take ‘no’ for an answer. They began to fundraise and attend City Council meetings to speak in favor of finding a solution to their predicament.

After a lot head scratching, City Manager Tom Ambrosino, Supt. Mary Bourque, the School Committee and the Council found a solution, but it cost $175,000. Students advocated that the expense was well worth it so that families could be together on what was a very big day.

And the City agreed.

This week, workers have been cobbling together 25,000 hard plastic pieces over the new turf field that will protect it on graduation and preserve the warranty as well.

“I think these students have realized the connection between their growing academic skills and their ability to influence policy and important decisions around the city,” he said. “Seeing that connection is really motivating for students.”

And those students, in what is another one of the largest classes in several years (last year had a record 344), will take the academic and advocacy lessons they have learned this year to a number of great colleges, universities and workplaces.

Students will be attending schools such as Dartmouth College, Tufts University, Boston University, Suffolk University and others. There are also several full-ride Posse Foundation Scholars attending schools such as Bucknell University, Denison College, Union College, and Centre University in Kentucky.

Graduation will take place on Sunday, June 9, outdoors at the new Chelsea Memorial Stadium at 1 p.m. – rain or shine.

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