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Chelsea Fire to Begin Collecting Toys for Tots, Requests Due by Nov 20

Chelsea Fire to Begin Collecting Toys for Tots, Requests Due by Nov 20

The Chelsea Fire Department (CFD) has begun collecting new, unwrapped, non-violent toys at our Central Station located at

307 Chestnut St., from now until December 15.

Anyone who would like to drop off a toy may come by the station between the hours of 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Last year the CFD collected three large pickup trucks of toys for the Toys for Tots program. After doing some research, CFD organizers found that there are 750 families and more than 1,300 children in the City of Chelsea who are provided Christmas gifts through the Toys for Tots/Globe Santa program.

Sadly this number has nearly doubled since the first year the CFD started up their drive.

“This program is a great opportunity for all of us to help bring a little happiness into the hearts of so many local families that have so little,” said Phil Rogers.

For those who are needy and looking for donations, time is of the essence as the deadline for requests is Nov. 20.

If an individual family needs toys, they should make contact with their social worker, their Pastor, local city or town hall or The Globe Santa for possible help. The cut-off date for toy requests in 2017 is November 20, Midnight. This is due to the high volume of requests.

Globe Santa- toy request info

https://globesanta.org/aboutreq.aspx#request or

contact the Department of Transitional Services at (877) 382-2363.

The Toys for Tots program has been in existence since 1947 when Major Bill Hendricks, USMCR founded Toys for Tots in Los Angeles. Some 5,000 toys were collected during that campaign before Christmas of 1947.

The mission of the U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots Program is to collect new, non-violent, unwrapped toys each year and distribute those toys as Christmas gifts to needy children in the Greater Boston community. Toys for Tots also wants to assure the less fortunate families throughout the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts that their children will be taken care of throughout the holiday season. There is no better satisfaction than seeing the smile of a child during the holiday season.

“On behalf of all the children made happy and the members of the Chelsea Fire Department, thank you so very much for all of your help,” said Rogers.

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Police Briefs 11-16-2017

Police Briefs 11-16-2017

SUSPICIOUS CHARACTER

On Nov. 5, at 3:15 p.m., a CPD officer, while parked across from the Chelsea Police Headquarters, was approached by a young male. The officer reported that the male seemed to be out of breath and in a panic.

He told the officer that he was riding his bicycle on Central Avenue by the cemetery and observed a truck drive past him four times, and each time the operator made comments to him that made him feel uncomfortable. The officer gave a description out to all Chelsea units to BOLO for a black Dodge Ram truck as reported by the young male. A short time later Chelsea officers observed the truck after it hit a vehicle near Chestnut and Fifth streets. Other Chelsea Units responded and stopped vehicle and placed operator under arrest. The vehicle was reported to be stolen out of Reading.

Michael Valentin, 17, of Revere, was charged with unlicensed operation, reckless operation, leaving the scene of property damage, and receiving a stolen vehicle.

STOLE CELL PHONE

On Nov. 5, at noon, a CPD officer on walking patrol in uniform observed from a distance of 100 feet a known female. The officer observed the female approach the victim, who was sitting against a wall by Cherry Street at Everett Avenue. The officer observed the female grab the victim with both hands and start to push him. The officer then observed female take a cell phone from victim. She was placed into custody on scene.

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, of Revere, was charged with unarmed robbery.

UNLICENSED LIVERY DRIVERS

On Nov. 6, at approximately 6 a.m., a traffic officer was monitoring the intersection of Crescent and Eastern avenues. At that location, the officer observed a vehicle take a right hand turn from Crescent Avenue onto Eastern Avenue without stopping. The operator was discovered to be unlicensed and was allegedly employed by Nunez Livery of East Boston.

The Traffic Division has been monitoring the practice of this livery company hiring unlicensed drivers. The operator was placed into custody and the vehicle was impounded.

Osmin Antonio Gomez-Bran, 21, of 743 Broadway, was charged with unlicensed operation and failing to yield at an intersection.

HIGH COURT AFFIRMS CONVICTION 

The state’s highest court this month upheld a Suffolk Superior Court jury’s murder verdict in the 2006 homicide of Yolande Danestoir by her son.

The 33-page unanimous decision affirms the conviction of Norton Cartright for first-degree in his mother’s slaying inside the Reynolds Street home they once shared – where Cartright had continued to live in a crawlspace after being ordered to stay out of the residence. Evidence at trial established that Cartright beat her with a hammer, causing fatal injuries, after she found him inside the apartment.

Cartright’s primary argument on appeal was that his videotaped and audio-recorded admissions to State and Chelsea police detectives were not voluntary, that his prior motion to suppress should have been granted, and that his statement should not have gone before the jury. The high court disagreed.

“We conclude, as did the motion judge, that the defendant’s confession was voluntary, and therefore admissible,” the court wrote, noting that the detectives “pointed accurately at the evidence arrayed against him” and that their suggestion of possible mitigating circumstances “were within the bounds of acceptable interrogation methods.”

Cartright also argued that the detectives’ appeals to let the victim “rest in peace” in the “afterlife” by telling “the truth” were improper. The high court rejected this claim, as well, finding that they were not “calculated to exploit a particular psychological vulnerability of the defendant” and did not render his incriminating statements involuntary.

“Contrary to the defendant’s contention, the religious references here were of a type that other courts have concluded were permissible,” the high court wrote. “Nothing indicates that police took advantage of, or knew of, the defendant’s personal religious beliefs, or of any special susceptibility he might have had to religious appeals.”

Police Log

Monday, 10/30

Juan Valle, 38, 127 Division St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Laura Fontanez, 52, 152 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery.

Wednesday, 11/1

Christopher Rivera, 25, 54 Maverick St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Alisha Cohen, 38, 36 Winthrop Rd., Chelsea, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage and disorderly conduct.

Thursday, 11/2

Alexandra Corn, 60, 49 Bromfield Rd., Somerville, was arrested for larceny over $250.

Friday, 11/3

Carlos Sanchez Renderos, 29, 140 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Kevin Merrill, 37, 240 Albany St., Cambridge, was arrested on a warrant.

Marcio Mezabaca, 32, 220 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, leaving scene of property damage, failure to stop for police, assault to murder and resisting arrest.

Saturday, 11/4

Jose Orozco Dias, 44, 73 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Sunday, 11/5

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, 106 Mountain Ave., Revere, was arrested for unarmed robbery.

Pedro Mejia, 34, 1641 Shore Rd., Revere, Larceny over $250.

Monday, 11/6

Antonio Gomez-Bran, 21, 743 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, failure to yield at intersection.

Jenry Lopez-Alvarez, 29, 106 Webster Ave., Chelsea, waas arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Tuesday, 11/7/17

Pena Aguilar Bonifacio, 48, address unknown, was arrested for trespassing.

Henry Hernandez-Valentin, 47, 21 John St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing.

Wednesday, 11/8

Alexander Hubbard, 45, 14 Savin St., Roxbury, was arrested on warrants.

Friday, 11/10

Allan Tzalam Hernandez, 18, 48 Harvard St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

German Sanchez, 23A Philomena Ave., Revere, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Saturday, 11/11

Robert Daniels, 18, 73A Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

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Robinson Topping Ticket, Rodriguez and Garcia Win District Contests:Brown, Bishop and Perlatonda Return to Council

Robinson Topping Ticket, Rodriguez and Garcia Win District Contests:Brown, Bishop and Perlatonda Return to Council

By Seth Daniel

Governor’s Councilor Terence Kennedy stopped by the polls to greet those campaigning, including here Candidate Henry Wilson, Councillor Enio Lopez, and Councillor Yamir Rodriguez.

Governor’s Councilor Terence Kennedy stopped by the polls to greet those campaigning, including here Candidate Henry Wilson, Councillor Enio Lopez, and Councillor Yamir Rodriguez.

Incumbents prevailed in several contested district Council contests on Tuesday, Nov. 7, while Council President Leo Robinson showed that experience equals strength in topping the at-large ticket with more than 1,000 votes.

Aside from School Committeeman at-Large candidate Frank DePatto, Robinson was the only candidate to top the 1,000 vote plateau.

In the at-large race, Robinson had 1,023 votes, Roy Avellaneda 986 and Damali Vidot 827. None of the three at-large seats were contested, but there was a spirited race to see who would top the ticket – a victory that carries implications for Council President.

“Now it’s time to stay focused and keep moving the City ahead,” Robinson said. “I want to thank the voters and all my supporters for hard work and dedication in making this victory happen.”

Meanwhile, in District 1, an empty seat saw Bob Bishop – the former councillor and city clerk – emerge as the victor over Planning Board member Todd Taylor, 267-213.

Bishop did win the Preliminary Election, but it came in spite of an endorsement of Taylor by outgoing Councillor Paul Murphy and Gov. Charlie Baker.

One contest that was very high-profile was that between Councillor Yamir Rodriguez and challenger Mark Rossi, of the License Commission. The two ran organized campaigns, with Rodriguez winning 129-98.

Another such contest came in District 5, where a rematch between Councillor Judith Garcia and Planning Board member Henry Wilson also showed lots of action.

Garcia won fairly easily in the end, 148-83.

On Admiral’s Hill in District 8, an empty seat saw former Councillor Calvin Brown cruise to victory over Jermaine Williams, 303-79.

In District 6, Councillor Giovanni Recupero prevailed 101-17 over Kristofer Haight, who had withdrawn from the race in September.

Up on the Soldiers’ Home in District 2, Councillor Luis Tejada beat challenger Olivia Walsh 124-94.

Former Councillor Joe Perlatonda will make his way back to the Council after winning an unopposed election for an open seat in Mill Hill (District 3).

Finally, District 4 Councillor Enio Lopez won an unopposed contest with 109 votes.

The results will mean that there will be three new faces on the Council in 2018.

For School Committee, two of the seats (District 4 and 5) had no candidate on the ballot. However, Lucia Henriquez put together a write-in campaign for one of the seats, and is believed to have won there.

Other winners included DePatto (at-Large), District 1 Rosemarie Carlisle, District 2 Jeannette Velez, District 3 Rich Maronski, District 4 no candidate, District 5 no candidate, District 6 Ana Hernandez, District 7 Kelly Garcia, and District 8 Yessenia Alfaro-Alvarez.

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New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

By Seth Daniel

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

In years past, when it was severely cold, those living on the streets of Chelsea had nowhere to go but under blankets.

Some, as recently as last year, died because of exposure to the cold.

Now, to help prevent that and to give those on the streets a place to go during the day, the Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) has opened in the basement of the Light of Christ Church at 738 Broadway.

The Day Center is a partnership between Pastor Ricardo Valle and his church, as well as the City of Chelsea, Pastor Ruben Rodriguez, MGH Chelsea and CAPIC.

It is part of the overall effort to provide a place for those that hang out in Bellingham Square or under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge to go for services – things such as meals, clothing, hot showers, a bathroom and – occasionally – a shoulder to cry on. It’s also a resource that can be activated by the City overnight in times of extreme cold or extreme weather events.

It isn’t a new idea, but rather one Valle and others have been championing privately for a number of years. However, about three years ago, the City began to show a greater interest in partnering with Valle and others during a relentless cold snap. One particularly bad night, they put together a quick plan to partner with Valle and host those from the streets as a trial emergency measure.

It went so well that plans have been ongoing since then to get something official going. Now, that has happened.

Valle said the center has been open since Aug. 28, and so far things are working really well. In fact, SELAH is just about ready to get their full commercial kitchen working so they can provide on-site cooked meals every day, Monday through Friday.

“This is an investment with no monetary returns,” said Valle. “If someone is sick and they die, that’s terrible but we can accept that. If they die because they are out in the cold, we can do better than that. I have this space here and I believe everyone deserves a second chance and maybe this is the place where they can come find a second chance…We talk to them and try to get them to ask for help. Once they ask, we immediately have a team ready to get them the help they need to get out of this lifestyle.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said the population of homeless and vagrants in the city needed a place to go during the day. Many used to hang out in the Square all day, and it wasn’t compatible with the business district and nearby schools. However, there was nowhere else for them to go.

“We were really looking to partner to create a place so there’s a place people can go to get a shower and something to eat,” he said. “We hope it can be a helpful resource for our Navigators. There are now options that they didn’t have before. So far it’s doing pretty well.”

Ambrosino said the City was able to give the Center a grant of about $35,000 to build the showers and bathrooms. Meanwhile, other monies were directed to the operating budget from the Mass General neighborhood monies.

Bobby Soroka lived on the streets and under the Bridge for years until getting his own place recently. He started coming to the Day Center when it opened, and now he returns to help out as a volunteer.

“I liked what I saw when I came here and they needed help,” he said. “I was here anyway. Without this, they wouldn’t be able to shower. It’s a nice place to hand and especially with winter coming. Everybody gets along. There are no fights or problems.”

Valle said having the shower and ability to clean up is very important. He said they often find those coming in very deteriorated conditions. One man had his feet rotted, and couldn’t walk well. In general, he said, it has helped the hygiene of the community of homeless that frequent and live in Chelsea.

“A shower means a lot to them,” he said. “The first time we opened the center, it took 30 minutes and you could feel the smell. Now you come here and you don’t feel that because they have access to a shower five days a week. We had a man who came in to take a shower and he took his shoes off and his feet had deteriorated. He couldn’t walk and was using a stick to get around. It was bad and we see a lot of people in that condition.”

Soroka now has his own housing, but at night in the cold, he said he still is uneasy when he smells the air. It brings back really bad memories, and so he avoids going outside at night. He also said it helps him to continue to relate to what those at the Center are going through.

“It meant a lot to see them open this, especially a few years ago when they opened it during the cold,” he said. “I was under the Bridge then. I’m not one to go to a shelter. I’ll sleep outside first. I have a place, but I don’t like to go outside. That night air scares me to death. It makes me think I could be out there again. I hope not.”

The Day Center is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is in desperate need of volunteers, Valle said, and he hopes that more Chelsea people will step forward to help.

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Piece of Chelsea History Goes Down to the Wrecking Ball

Piece of Chelsea History Goes Down to the Wrecking Ball

By Seth Daniel

The old Chelsea Clock building was torn down on Friday and Monday of this week. The building stood as the headquarters for the luxury clock maker for more than 100 years. They moved out in 2014, and Fairfield Residential tore down the iconic Chelsea landmark to make way for more than 700 apartments.

The old Chelsea Clock building was torn down on Friday and Monday of this week. The building stood as the headquarters for the luxury clock maker for more than 100 years. They moved out in 2014, and Fairfield Residential tore down the iconic Chelsea landmark to make way for more than 700 apartments.

Three generations of Chelsea residents have worked, walked or driven by the famous Chelsea Clock building on Everett Avenue, but none will be able to do either any longer.

The last pieces of the former brick luxury clock factory – outfitted with the black banner and white lettering reading ‘Chelsea Clock’ – came down last Friday and Monday.

After more than 100 years and two major conflagrations, the old building that in many ways symbolized Chelsea as much as the Soldiers’ Home water tower, is now gone.

“I think most people in Chelsea are a bit saddened by seeing that iconic building disappear, but the environmental conditions made it impossible to retain,” said City Manager Tom Ambrosino. “I just hope that what replaces it, a modern apartment complex with a bit of retail on Everett Avenue, will bring positive benefits to the City.”

The Chelsea Clock company, now on Second Street in a restored building, said it had no comment on the demolition of its former long-time headquarters.

What is about to replace that piece of Chelsea history is a 700-plus unit apartment community on a large piece of land, adding some retail in the mix fronting Everett Avenue.

Fairfield Residential is developing the property, and intends to begin construction soon now that the demolition is complete.

The Chelsea Clock company moved out of the old building in 2014, and has occupied their new headquarters for three years.

Fairfield has said it hopes to have occupancy of its project in 2019.

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City, State Facing the Challenges of New Arrivals from Puerto Rico

City, State Facing the Challenges of New Arrivals from Puerto Rico

By Seth Daniel

With virtually nothing left in Puerto Rico after two devastating hurricanes this fall, many from the island are flocking to family in the mainland United States to try to put their lives together – and with a huge Puerto Rican population in Chelsea, many are arriving here with questions and needs.

Chelsea Collaborative Director Gladys Vega and a team of stakeholders from the City have been meeting to try to solve the many issues that are coming up or likely will come up as more and more arrive in the City.

Vega said the situation has now turned from sending aid to the island, to focusing resources in the City.

“There are no schools and no electricity and there are a lot of problems there, so many are coming here,” said Vega at a recent meeting in Chelsea High School with about a dozen stakeholders. “We are extremely certain that folks will continue to come because Chelsea has a Puerto Rican community that is very established. Already, some of them are coming to the Collaborative, the Housing Authority, CAPIC and the School Department…We are really at this moment turning our efforts. Before, we were all about collecting donations and sending them to Puerto Rico. Now we are realizing that we need to use some of those same resources and donations right here in Chelsea because people are starting to come here and they have tremendous needs.”

Some of the situations that have been brought up at the state level surround housing in public housing.

Juan Vega, a Chelsea resident who is the Undersecretary of Housing for the state, said there is a team trying to work out situations that will certainly arise.

Those include family members who show up at a public housing complex with nowhere else to go.

Juan said they cannot stay for more than a week as a visitor, but at the same time, they have nowhere else to go. He said the state is aware of it and is working with the federal government to secure some sort of emergency waiver program.

Gladys Vega said one family has already experienced this, with relatives coming to an elderly housing apartment.

“Now they are here in an elderly housing apartment,” she said. “They are told they can stay 10 days and then they have to leave. They’re here now. If they stay past the 10 days, the tenant could be kicked out. We don’t want our established members of the community to lose their housing or their jobs trying to deal with these situations.”

Meanwhile, some that are  coming are elderly and in need of medical accommodations, such as handicap ramps built onto homes. Rich Pedi of the Carpenter’s Union has volunteered workers to build such ramps on an emergency basis.

In the schools, Supt. Mary Bourque said they are working to be creative in registering new arrivals for school. In many cases, they don’t have a birth certificate or any documents. All of them were lost in the hurricane for the most part.

Bourque said everyone should come to the Parent Information Center (PIC) to enroll children, even without any documents.

“That’s the first message to get out there,” she said. “If you’re coming to Chelsea and need to enroll students, come to the PIC. We will work with you. The second thing we’re worried about is the trauma once they are enrolled. They have been through a traumatic situation and they will need to see social workers.”

Meanwhile, with November now here, the other thing that will soon be necessary is winter clothing. Many are from an island where a coat is rarely necessary. Now, in Chelsea, they’ll need far more than what they have.

“We’re coming into winter and they don’t have the supplies one needs for a New England winter,” said Bourque. “We need volunteers to donate coats, pants, shoes and warm clothes in all sizes.”

The Collaborative is setting up a welcome center and brochure to help people who are arriving.

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Police Briefs 11-09-2017

Police Briefs 11-09-2017

POLICE Briefs By Seth Daniel

TRIED TO KILL POLICE OFFICER WITH CAR

On Nov. 3 at 1:10 p.m., a victim of a Hit and Run flagged down a CPD officer on a detail. The victim reported that he had been struck by the vehicle, which fled the scene located at 280 Second St. The suspect’s vehicle was located and the detail officer attempted to stop the vehicle with verbal commands from the roadway. The officer was forced to jump out of the way to avoid being struck as the operator continued to flee the scene at a high rate of speed. The operator was later stopped by other CPD units and the operator was placed into custody

Marcio Mezabaca, 32, of 220 Broadway, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor, leaving the scene of property damage, failing to stop for police, assault to murder and resisting arrest.

STOLE CELL PHONE

On Nov. 5, at noon, a female known to a CPD officer on patrol was observed in the company of a male in the area of Cherry Street and Everett Avenue. The officer observed from a distance the known female pushing the victim, and then grabbing his cellphone. Once she observed the officer, she fled the area. She was located a short distance away and placed into custody.

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, of Revere, was charged with unarmed robbery.

ROBBED WITH BALL BAT

On Oct. 26 at 5:59 p.m., an armed robbery was reported at the Corner Market, located at 803 Broadway. The victim clerk stated that an unknown male party wearing a ski mask entered the store, struck him with a wooden bat style object, and then made away with money, an unknown amount of $30 lottery tickets and cigarettes.

The victim was treated on scene by EMS for an abrasion sustained on his left arm. The suspect was described as a black male approximately 45-47 years old, 5’8” tall, wearing a black ski mask, black jacket, blue jeans, black shoes, and gloves.

Please contact CPD Detectives if you have information to report.

PROBLEM OUTSIDE RESTAURANT

On Nov. 1, at 6:19 p.m., a disturbance was reported outside Chung Wah Restaurant, located at 460 Broadway. Officers observed a female who appeared to be intoxicated displaying boisterous behavior and disturbing the flow of pedestrian and traffic. After further investigation, she was placed into custody for being disorderly

Alisha Cohen, 38, of 36 Winthrop Rd., was charged with being disorderly and possession of an alcoholic beverage.

TEMPER, TEMPER

On Oct. 29 at 10:32 a.m., a male subject was placed into custody after he had been observed breaking a window on the old Salvation Army Donation Center, located at 456 Broadway. The officer observed the male subject punch the window as a result of an apparent argument between him and an unknown female party. He was placed into custody for malicious destruction of property.

Andrew Babigumira, 31, homeless, was charged with wanton destruction.

STABBED FOR DEALING DRUGS

On Oct. 29, at 5:05 p.m., officers responded to a reported stabbing at 744 Broadway #2. A victim was located inside the apartment with minor lacerations to the hand. The victim stated that a dispute arose with his roommate over him dealing narcotics out of their apartment.

The suspect was found by CPD offices and placed under arrest.

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Thank You to Our Veterans

Thank You to Our Veterans

Its was 99 years ago this Saturday, on Nov. 11, 1918, that World War I formally came to a conclusion on the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month.

Americans observed the first anniversary of the end of the war the following year when the holiday originated as Armistice Day in 1919.

The first world war was referred to at the time as “the war to end all wars.” It was thought that never again would mankind engage in the sort of madness that resulted in the near-total destruction of Western Civilization and the loss of millions of lives for reasons that never have been entirely clear to anybody either before, during, or since.

Needless to say, history has shown us that such thinking was idealistically foolhardy. Just 21 years later, the world again became enmeshed in a global conflagration that made the first time around seem like a mere practice run for the mass annihilation that took place from 1939-45.

Even after that epic second world war, America has been involved in countless bloody conflicts in the 72 years since General Douglas MacArthur accepted the Japanese surrender on the Battleship Missouri. Today, we still have troops fighting on battlefields in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Niger, and God-knows-where else.

Peace at hand has been nothing but a meaningless slogan for most of the past century.

Armistice Day officially became known as Veteran’s Day in 1954 so as to include those who served in WWII and the Korean War. All of our many veterans since then also have become part of the annual observance to express our nation’s appreciation for the men and women who bravely have answered the call of duty to ensure that the freedoms we enjoy as Americans have been preserved against the many challenges we have faced.

Although Veteran’s Day, as with all of our other national holidays, unfortunately has become commercialized, we urge our readers to take a moment, even if just quietly by ourselves, to contemplate what we owe the veterans of all of our wars and to be grateful to them for allowing us to live freely in the greatest nation on earth.

In addition, let us offer a prayer that despite the drumbeats of war-talk emanating from Washington these days, a peaceful solution will be found for all of our present-day conflicts before they escalate into a full-fledged war.

If nothing else, Veterans Day should remind us that freedom isn’t free and that every American owes a debt of immeasurable gratitude and thanks to those who have put their lives on the line to preserve our ideals and our way of life.

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Sports 11-09-2017

Sports 11-09-2017

CHS Roundup

CHS boys soccer drops 2-1 heartbreaker to Boston Latin in tourney

The Chelsea High boys soccer team dropped a 2-1 decision in as excruciating a fashion as possible in the first round of the Division 1 North Sectional of the MIAA State Soccer Tournament this past Saturday evening under the lights at Chelsea Stadium.

After spotting Latin a 1-0 lead in the first 15 minutes, the Red Devils, who entered the contest as the No. 7 seed in the D-1 North, settled down and soon came to control the play for most of the remainder of the contest.

However, it would not be until there were seven minutes left to play that Chelsea would bring the score back to level when Red Devil senior Jephte Marcellus found the back of the Latin net. Fellow senior Kevin Vasquez set up the goal with a superb crossing pass from his defensive position into the top of the box, where Marcellus settled the ball and drilled a powerful shot past the Latin keeper.

The teams then battled fiercely for the remainder of regulation and through both of the 10-minute overtime periods. After a total of 100 minutes of play, the contest came down to penalty kicks, with each side getting five.

Chelsea went first and the teams alternated, with the first four attempts by both teams finding the back of the net. However, the Latin keeper guessed correctly on Chelsea’s fifth shot, making the save, and the fifth Latin shooter made good on his attempt to end the game.

“This by far was our best game of the season,” said CHS assistant coach Evan Protasowicki of the Red Devils, whose last regular-season contest was a 5-0 rout of a tourney-qualifying Salem squad. “We had an early case of the jitters, but then played our style of ball and controlled the tempo. We were sharp at both ends of the field. It was just a tough way to lose.”

Milutinovic Coach of Year; Umanzor-Torres league MVP; four others named all-stars

Post-season accolades poured in for the Chelsea High boys soccer team at the meeting of the Commonwealth Athletic Conference coaches this past week.

Long-time CHS head coach Mick Milutinovic, who guided a young Red Devil squad to a CAC Large Division title after a slow start, was named the CAC Large’s Coach of the Year.

Red Devil senior captain Kevin Umanzo-Torres was named the Most Valuable Player of the CAC Large. Fellow captain Bryan Armas, the CHS keeper, and teammates Jephte Marcellus, Carlos Arevalo-Garcia, and Delmer Romero were named all-stars.

High finish for CHS star LeClerc in coaches’ meet

Last Saturday the CHS boys and girls cross-country teams traveled to Wrentham for the Frank Mooney State Coaches Invitational.

The Red Devils were led by senior captain Jose Leclerc who ran a personal best of 16:38 for the 3.1 mile course and was sixth out of 529 runners. Jose earned a medal for his extraordinary performance.

“Jose ran a smart race and moved up as the race wore on,” said CHS head coach Don Fay. “This Saturday is the Eastern Massachusetts Division 2 championship, and Jose has a very good chance of qualifying for all-states, which is the top seven individuals who are not on an all-state qualifying team.”

Also running well for Chelsea were junior Justin Turner, who ran a 66-second personal record (PR) of 18:44.  Yosef Rubin ran 18:57, which was a PR by 14 seconds.

Jazmany Reyes had a PR by 38 seconds, running 18:58.  Limilson Tavares and Ronny Gomez each ran PR times, 19:07 and 19:08 respectively.

“We could have all of our top seven this week break 19:00, which has never happened before,” said Fay. “We have a lot of depth and one of the better runners in the state this year.”

For the Lady Red Devils, Yarid Deras medaled (top 50) with a 44th place performance among the 327 girls who were on the starting line. Yarid’s time of 21:24 was her second-best clocking on the Wrentham course.

Jocelyn Poste broke 22 minutes for the first time (21:58) and finished  65th.  Amanda Dias finished in 106th place in 22:33 and Cynthia Mancia came across in 120th position.

Both the girls and boys teams will be returning Saturday to the state training facility in Wrentham to compete in the Division 2 Eastern Mass. championship race.

Bruins Beat

by Bob Morello

Bruins fighting the injuries

The month of November has started out pretty well for the Bruins, that is, when one considers the current extensive injury list of Boston. At press time the team had listed: Brad Marchand (upper body), Anton Khudobin (lower body), David Krejci (upper body), Ryan Spooner (abductor tear), Noel Acciari (fractured finger), David Backes (colon surgery), and Adam McQuaid (lower body). With a M.A.S.H.-like roster it is surprising that the Bs have been able to put up numbers that reflect their competitiveness and team depth. Coming into last night’s matchup with the New York Rangers, their stats show that with 13 games played, they are just three points behind second-place Toronto Maple Leafs in the Atlantic Division, with three games in hand, and five points behind second-place Pittsburgh Penguins in the Eastern Conference with Boston holding four games in hand.

On the Bruins’ radar, following their trip to New York, will be a home-and-home series with Toronto this weekend. Friday (7 p.m.) the Leafs will host Boston, and the team returns home to Garden ice for the back end on Saturday. A good chance for the locals to move up the standings, both in the Atlantic Division and the Eastern Conference. Their schedule has the Bs right back on the road for a three-game road trip to the West Coast, that will have them visiting the Anaheim Ducks (Wednesday, Nov. 15 at 10 p.m.), the Los Angeles Kings (Thursday, Nov. 16 at 10:30 p.m.), and end their trip to the West with the San Jose Sharks (Saturday, Nov. 18 at 10:30 p.m.), before returning to the East Coast to be hosted by the New Jersey Devils (Wednesday, Nov. 22 at 7 p.m.).

Boston’s upcoming five-game schedule will have a huge impact on the team’s standings, and gives them a chance to recover their position, with many of the injured hopefully ready to return to the lineup. The return of Marchand was not expected for last night’s game with the Rangers, but he will likely be a game-day decision for both the Friday and Saturday Toronto games this weekend. Krejci has found his way to practice ice earlier this week, but is not penciled in for any of this week’s games. In goal last night (Wednesday) versus the Rangers, Khudobin was expected to be backing up Tuukka Rask, and if he continues to progress, he should be getting a start for Boston in the Toronto home-and-home series, Friday or Saturday. Noel Acciari is also expected to return for the Toronto series.

If there is a silver lining to the Bruins’ extensive injury report, it would be the fact that Boston has had an ample amount of time to test several of their youngsters toiling for the Providence Bruins. Several Baby B’s players have had impressive showings, and all have definitely enjoyed their stay with the big club, using the opportunity to show their NHL ability. It certainly has given the Bruins the potential of a ‘bright future!’

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Obituaries 11-09-2017

Obituaries 11-09-2017

John Petrillo

Of Revere

John Petrillo of Revere died on November 2.

A member of Local 25, he was the beloved son of Ralph Petrillo Jr. of Revere and the late Maureen Yolanda (Simone); cherished brother of Tayla Yolanda Simone of Revere and the late Ralph Petrillo III; loving uncle of Talia Yolanda Petrillo, Kelsey and Aryana and is also survived by Thomas Puzzo who loved him like his own son, cousins Guz Diaz and Julia Kariuki and by many caring cousins and friends.

Funeral arrangements were the Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno Funeral Home,  Revere.   For guest book please visit www.Buonfiglio.com

Rosemary Sullivan

Of Chelsea

Rosemary A. (Mahoney) Sullivan of Chelsea, formerly of Readville, passed away on November 5 at the age of 89.

Rosemary was born in Boston to Thomas and Margaret Mahoney.

A homemaker for much of her life,  after raising her children, she spent many years working for Boston Children’s Hospital and Cathedral High School, both in Boston. After retirement, Rosemary enjoyed spending time with her family, including her grandchildren and great grandchildren. More recently, Rosemary would spend her days reading and watching her favorite programs on television as well as birdwatching and spending time with her favorite dogs.

The wife of the late Robert Sullivan, she was the beloved mother of Robert Sullivan of Westfield, Daniel Sullivan and his wife, Dome of Virginia and Kathleen “Kathy” Randazzo and her husband, Richard of Chelsea, Pastoral Associate of Immaculate Conception Church in Everett and the late Paul Sullivan. Rosemary is lovingly survived by her grandchildren: Lisa, Dan, Heather, Rich, Brian, Krissy, Kaitlyn, Dee, Matt and Corey, as well as her greatgrandchildren: Drea, Maggie, Rowynn and Alexandria. She is also the dear sister to siblings Marie Prata of Beverly (formerly of Readville) and her late husband Tony, Jeanne Pratt and her husband, Chris of California and Thomas Mahoney and his wife, Judy of Washington and many nieces and nephews.

Her Funeral will be from the Carafa Family Funeral Home, 389 Washington Avenue, Chelsea on Friday, November 10 at 8 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at Immaculate Conception Church, 489 Broadway, Everett at 9 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited to attend.  Visiting hours in the Funeral Home are on Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m. Interment will be at Brookdale Cemetery in Dedham.

Mary DeCristoforo

Fan of current events, football and Facebook

Mary L. (Domenichello) DeCristoforo of Revere, formerly of Chelsea, passed away in the loving presence of her beloved family in the early morning hours of Thursday November 2. She was 81 years old.

 Born and raised in Chelsea, she was a beloved daughter of the late Michael A. Domenichello, Sr. and Marie (Courtney) Spadafora-Domenichello.  Mary attended local schools and received her early education in Chelsea.  A resident of Chelsea for most of her life, she resided for the past 30 years in Revere together with her beloved husband Kenneth.

In her lifetime, Mary enjoyed keeping up with current events, following football, and staying in touch with her many friends posting and sharing her recent happenings on Facebook.

She is survived by her beloved husband of 47 years, Kenneth A. DeCristoforo. She was the devoted mother of Robert DiOrio and his wife ,Terry of Chelsea and Kenneth M. DeCristoforo with his friend and companion Bonnie Douglas; cherished grandmother of Robert J. “RJ” DiOrio and his wife, Catherine of Connecticut and Deryn DiOrio of Chelsea and the dear sister of Rose Buckley,  Ellen Russell and Michael Domenichello, Jr.

Funeral arrangements were by the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, Chelsea.  Interment was at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett.

Charles Melvin

Long time Chelsea School Crossing Guard

Charles R. Melvin passed away on Friday evening, November 3 in the loving presence of his beloved wife.  He was 84 years old.

Born and raised in Everett, a son of the late Charles and Ruth (Leonard) Melvin, he received his education in Everett attending local schools.  He enlisted in the US Navy, d served honorably during the Korean Conflict, returned to Everett and for the next 34 years he worked for Touraine Paints in Everett.

Forty-six years ago, he married his beloved wife, Barbara (Doncaster-Broman) and settled in Chelsea. For the past 20 years, Charles worked for the Chelsea School Dept. as a School Crossing Guard. Rarely ever missing a day he loved his assignments watching out for the school children and parents to and from school.

During his lifetime, Charles enjoyed family camping and prided himself as an amateur horseshoe player.  His love was family, centering around his grandchildren.

in addition to his parents, he was also predeceased by a sister, June Windsor.  He is survived by his beloved wife of 46 years, Barbara N. (Doncaster-Broman) Melvin of Chelsea. He was the devoted father of Theresa N. Rosati and her husband, Anthony of Wells, ME. Chelsea Police Officer Timothy T. Broman, Sr. and his wife, Angela of Wilmington and Dawn Egan and her husband, John of Laconia NH.  He was the cherished grandfather of Chelsea Police Dispatcher Zachary T. Broman, Timothy T. Broman and Chelsea Police Officer Thomas M. Broman, John and Jacqueline Egan and the dear brother of James Melvin of Melrose, Ruth Currie of Seattle, WA and Donna Blake of Lynn.

Funeral arrangements were by the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, Chelsea.  Interment was at Puritan Lawn Memorial Park, Peabody. Should friends desire, contributions in his memory may be made to St Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Ribenia Ramos de Girald

Of Chelsea, formerly of Honduras

Rubenia A. Ramos de Girald

Of Chelsea passed away on Friday, November 3 after a long illness. She was 77 years old.

Born and raised in Olanchito-Yoro, Honduras, she has been a resident of Chelsea for the past 29 years. Rubenia worked with commercial fisheries in Gloucester as a packager for many years. She enjoyed trips to visit Honduras, traveling to New York City and Puerto Rico.

She was predeceased by her parents, Tomas Carcamo and Anselma Ramos, her husband, Jesus Girald and four of her nine children. She was the devoted mother of Erica Calixa of Chelsea. She is also survived by two daughters, two sons, numerous grandchildren, two great-great grandchildren and two brothers in Honduras.

Funeral arrangements were by the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, Chelsea.

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Shakirah Hammonds-Vega

Of Chelsea

Shakirah Hammonds-Vega of Chelsea died on November 4.

The devoted daughter of Brenda I. Vega of Chelsea and Shyreak A. Hammonds of Boston, she was the beloved sister of Carlos Ayuso-Vega of Chelsea, cherished granddaughter of Ana Maria Vega of Chelsea, Peggie Hammonds of South Carolina and the late Juan Vega-Crespo and is also lovingly survived by her aunts and uncles, Juan R. Vega and his wife, Carolyn, Anna Iris Vega, Wanda Vega and Edward Vega, all of Chelsea, Kim Hammonds of South Carolina, Asya McCord of South Carolina and Rhakeem J. Kinard of Boston, as well as her cousins, Alexander, Anthony, Adrianna, Angelina, Julian, Jazmine, Selinnet, Edward, Jr., Nilda and Octavian and fondly remembered by her stepfather Carlos Ayuso.

Family and friends are kindly invited to attend a Funeral Mass to be celebrated in St. Rose Church, 600 Broadway, Chelsea on Friday, November 10 at 10 a.m. All attending are to go directly to the church, parking is available across from the church behind the rectory. Visiting Hours in the Smith Funeral Home, 125 Washington Avenue, Chelsea will be today, Thursday, from 4 to 8 p.m. Committal services are private. The family suggests that in lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in her name be made to www.youcaring/shakirah

To send a message of condolence to Shakirah’s family, please visitwww.smithfuneralhomes.com

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