Herald Backs Mohegan, Globe Endorses Wynn Project

Herald Backs Mohegan, Globe Endorses Wynn Project

Just a few weeks after the Boston Herald endorsed the Mohegan Sun project, the Boston Globe surprised everyone with a comprehensive endorsement of the Wynn casino project in its edition on Sunday, Sept. 9.

“…a rival plan in Everett looks much more in keeping with the law’s intent,” read the editorial. “If commissioners are determined to green-light a site for casino development this week, despite the looming referendum, they should choose the Everett option. It provides an economic and environmental boost to what may be the most downtrodden corner of Greater Boston, and enjoys far greater community support than the rival plan for a Mohegan Sun casino at Suffolk Downs.”

The Globe’s endorsement – which covered an entire page of the paper – went on to say the Mohegan casino should have been done with after last November’s failed referendum in Eastie.

“The defeat of the initial casino plan at the site last year should have been the end of the proposal, and the hastily revised plan and Suffolk Downs’s new partnership with Mohegan Sun does not cancel out the clear verdict of voters in East Boston last year on a materially similar proposal,” it read.

The Globe’s seal of approval prompted a lengthy letter from Revere Mayor Dan Rizzo on Monday about what he considered inaccuracies with the editorial.

“The Globe editorial board would be more honest with its readers by stating that it does not want to see a resort-style casino built in eastern Massachusetts, rather than encourage a license for an applicant with a track record of dramatically over promising and then disappearing,” he wrote on Monday. “The more people know the truth, the more they like Mohegan Sun’s plan.”

Wynn had no comment on the Globe endorsement when contacted, or to the Herald’s endorsement of its rival project.

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Obituaries 09-11-2014

David Terenzi

30 Year General Electric Employee

David Terenzi of Revere, formerly of East Boston, died September 2.

David graduated from East Boston High School in 1974 and then enlisted in the United States Air Force. After an honorable discharge, David attended East Coast Aero Tech then went on to work at General Electric in Aviation for 30 years.

Born September 7, 1955, he was the son of the late Quirino Richard and Eleanor Terenzi; brother of Michael Terenzi and Dolores and her husband, Vincenzo DelViscovo, all of Londonderry, NH and the late Rita E. Fardella. He is also survived by six godchildren and several nieces and nephews.
A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m, Saturday, September 13 at Saint Jude’s Parish in Londonderry, NH. Interment will be in Pleasant View Cemetery in Londonderry. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in his memory to the POW MIA Foundation, 7407 LeGrande Street South, Jacksonville, FL 32244. To sign the online guestbook, please visit www.buonfiglio.com

Frank Cavaretta

Retired Train Operator and Bus Driver

Frank L. Cavaretta of Revere died on September 5. He was 90 years old.

Born and raised in Revere, he was a life long Revere resident and worked for the T as a train operator and then retired from the T as a bus driver.

He was the beloved husband of the late Florence (Juliano); devoted father of Frank Jr. and his wife, Terry of Pepperell, Lenny and his wife, Terezinha Sarmento of Las Vegas and Rosemary Cavaretta; dear brother of Mary Lunnetta and her husband, Joseph of Wilmington and the late Antonina Karedes and is also survived by six loving grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

His Funeral will be held from the Paul Buonfiglio & Sons –Bruno Funeral Home, 128 Revere St., Revere today, Wednesday at 10 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Anthony’s Church at 11 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited. Entombment will be in Holy Cross Mausoleum. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Jude Children’s Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105. For guest book please visit www.buonfiglio.com

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Chelsea Police Looking Into Brazen Daylight Stabbing Of 14-year-old

Chelsea Police Looking Into Brazen Daylight Stabbing Of 14-year-old

Chelsea Police are following several leads and interviewing witnesses regarding a brazen and brutal stabbing on Blossom Street Monday afternoon by multiple attackers.

Capt. Keith Houghton said the 14-year-old is a student at Chelsea High School (CHS), but was not at school on the day of the attack.

Supt. Mary Bourque confirmed that the student was absent and the school – though nearby – was never part of the attack and was never in any jeopardy. She did confirm he was a student there, but could not give his name.

Police said around 1:40 p.m. the young man was stabbed multiple times by at least three people – one of whom was on a bike.

Witnesses at the scene said they had observed the attack and saw the three alleged perpetrators flee up Carmel Street.

Those witnesses then found the young man lying in the street and gravely injured. They alerted police, who responded and had the young man transported to Mass General.

He was in serious condition at first, but is now in stable condition.

“Two detectives interviewed the witnesses and have briefly been able to speak to the victim at the hospital,” said Houghton. “Based on that information and evidence recovered at the scene, we are working on identifying his attackers.”

Houghton said one of the first things police did when they found out the age of the youth was to check CHS and make sure the incident hadn’t started there or filtered into there. It was quickly confirmed, he said, that all was quiet at the school and that the young man had not reported to school on Monday.

Unconfirmed reports on the street were that the young man – after having been stabbed – was crawling up Addison and Blossom Street and pleading for help, calling out that his attackers were going to kill him. Those cries for help, perhaps, are what alerted several nearby witnesses to the brazen daylight attack and sent the perpetrators fleeing.

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Rep.Ryan Cruises To Victory Over Avellaneda

Rep.Ryan Cruises To Victory Over Avellaneda

Back in March, State Rep. Dan Ryan easily toppled the competition during a special election for the Second Suffolk District State Representative seat and Tuesday night was no different for the Charlestown native and incumbent.

Though Avellaneda bested Ryan in Chelsea by several hundred votes, Ryan’s strong showing and the larger voting block in Charlestown led him to a comfortable victory overall of more than 1,000 votes.

The final tally for the entire district was Ryan with 2,541 and Avellaneda 1,273.

Ryan officially won the Democratic Nomination for the seat during Tuesday’s special election over Avellaneda, who challenged Ryan during the March special election also. With no Republican challenger, Ryan will head into the General Election unopposed and will win reelection to continue serving Charlestown and Chelsea at the State House.

In Charlestown, Ryan grabbed 84 percent of the vote or 2,172 votes. Avellaneda ended up with only 447 votes in Charlestown.

In Chelsea, Ryan got 31 percent of the vote or 369 votes and Avellaneda got 69 percent with 826 votes. For Avellaneda, that was fewer votes than he got in the cold-weather Special Election earlier this year, which was highly unexpected. He scored more than 1,000 votes in Chelsea back then.

Chelsea’s official turnout number for the Primary was 14.5 percent.

“I want to thank all the hard work of all the volunteers over these past six months,” said Ryan at his victory party at the Warren Tavern in Charlestown. “We never stopped working and we will continue to work for the people of Charlestown and Chelsea.”

Ryan energized the crowd when he talked about the contentious casino topic.

“This reelection means that Charlestown has a seat at the negotiating table and I will be there because my next campaign stop will be to the casino commission,” said Ryan to thunderous applause. “If they decide to approve a casino in Everett, you can rest assure Wynn will have to pay and there will be a new Sullivan Square.”

On his growing support in Chelsea with elected officials like City Council President Matt Frank from Chelsea backing him, Ryan said he plans to do the same for Chelsea.

“The bridge from Charlestown to Chelsea is two ways,” said Ryan. “That means that Chelsea came here to support me and Charlestown will be in Chelsea any time they need support.”

Ryan’s victory back in March brought the seat back to Charlestown for the first time since the late 1970s. Jimmy Collins won the seat back in 1977. In 1978 the seat was redistricted and Chelsea’s Richie Voke ousted Collins. The seat has been held by Chelsea residents ever since.

Prior to working for U.S. Congressman Michael Capuano as his chief aide, Ryan spent 10 years working at the Charlestown Boys and Girls Club where he served as director of the Teen Center and program coordinator for the Healthy Charlestown Coalition.

Ryan and his wife, Kara Segal-Ryan, are raising their three children.

  • In other election action on the state level, Chelsea pretty much reflected the overall statewide returns, picking just about every candidate on the Democratic side that won.

Gubernatorial Nominee Martha Coakley got 964 votes (58 percent) in Chelsea, and won statewide with 42 percent. Steve Grossman had 479 votes (29 percent) locally and 36 percent of the vote statewide. Don Berwick gained 21 percent of the vote statewide and 13 percent in Chelsea.

For Lt. Gov., Stephen Kerrigan won locally with 44 percent of the Chelsea vote, but got 51 percent statewide. Leland Cheung garnered 30 percent of the vote in Chelsea and statewide.

Attorney General nominee Maura Healy soared to victory in Chelsea (61 percent) and statewide (62 percent) over Warren Tolman (38 percent in Chelsea and statewide).

For Treasurer, Deb Goldberg secured the nomination statewide with 43 percent of the vote, while also getting 43 percent of the Chelsea vote. Barry Finegold had 33 percent locally and 32 percent statewide. Tom Conroy scored 23 percent of the Chelsea vote.

State Sen. Sal DiDomenico cruised to victory with 1,266 votes, though running unopposed.

On the Republican side, Gubernatorial nominee Charlie Baker won easily in Chelsea with 76 percent of the GOP vote and similar results statewide.

In the county races, most notably Suffolk County Sheriff Steve Tompkins bested Revere’s Jeremiah Goodwin in Chelsea and county-wide. Goodwin finished second in Chelsea, but third county-wide behind perennial candidate Doug Bennett – whose only splash in the race was his homemade, crudely painted green signs that were virtually everywhere.

Felix Arroyo took the race for Register of Probate, getting 641 votes in Chelsea (44 percent) along the way. He unseats Patty Campatelli, who got 341 Chelsea votes.

District Attorney Dan Conley took in another victory, though unopposed, and in Prattville, State Rep. RoseLee Vincent won an unopposed race for the district that represents that neighborhood and half of Revere.

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Ascher Appointed Honorary Chair Of ‘Walk for Living’

Ascher Appointed Honorary Chair Of ‘Walk for Living’

In a time when school and community face challenges in connecting, Chelsea High School (CHS) and the Chelsea Jewish Foundation have had no problems in bridging the gap and creating a strong partnership.

This month, Sept. 28, the Leonard Florence Center for Living (LFCL) on Admiral’s Hill will host it’s annual ALS & MS Walk for Living and scores of CHS students will once again be participating enthusiastically.

This according to Ilana Ascher, a history teacher at CHS, who has been appointed an Honorary Chair of the event.

Kiss 108 radio personality Matt Siegel will be the the host of the 6th annual signature event.

Ascher said this week that her students really enjoy participating in the walk and they began getting involved a few years ago with the InterACT Club – which is affiliated with the Rotary Club.

“Our students really do love the walk,” she said, noting that they hope to have 100 students participate. “The Center really does a great job of including its residents in the event. A lot of times the kids here do a walk and don’t connect with the reason or the people they are walking for. This walk is different because our kids have been able to tour the ALS center and meet the residents who they’re walking for.”

LFCL resident Steve Saling – a die-hard spokesman for the Center – has even come to talk to the kids at CHS and give his personal story and how he has overcome incredible odds.

As part of the Board, Ascher and two appointed student have been meeting with the rest of the walk coordinators all summer to fine-tune the details. It’s just one of many things the CHS students and the Center have collaborated on, though.

“The ALS Center really wants the kids to be a part of it during the walk and even during the rest of the year,” said Ascher. “There truly is a partnership that has formed between the ALS Center and CHS. This event is particularly good because it is short, quick and inspirational. The kids can feel good about what they’re doing and do something good right here in Chelsea.”

Ascher has taught at CHS for 10 years and spent two years in Chelsea middle schools. Prior to that, she taught in Miami, FL. She lives in Chelsea with her husband, whose family goes way back in the city.

His grandmother worked in the old Minsky’s Chicken Butcher Shop and attended the old Chelsea High School.

The ALS & MS Walk for Living will take place on Sept. 28 on Admiral’s Hill. For more details, call (617) 409-8973 or go online to www.walkforliving.org.

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Councillor Hatleberg Will Not Seek Re-Election

Councillor Hatleberg Will Not Seek Re-Election

Long-time Councillor at-Large Brian Hatleberg reported this week that he will not seek another term on the Council next year.

Citing family obligations, Hatleberg said he was just being pulled in too many directions and had to make a decision to give something up.

“I’m tapped out and I am not going to be running again,” he said. “At this point, I have to be honest about what I can and cannot do. I have to be able to have balance on both sides of the equation – with my public side and with my family side – and give a full effort with both. Something had to give.

“It’s been a great pleasure and great surprise in my career to be elected to the Council in Chelsea and to serve,” he continued. “It’s been a wonderful thing to do and I continue to enjoy doing it and will until my term is up. However, I have to realistic.”

Hatleberg and his wife, School Committee member Lisa Lineweaver, have small children and devote a great deal of time to them. He said that – and really nothing else – was the reason for his decision.

He will continue to serve until the end of 2015.

Hatleberg has been a very popular councillor over the years that he has served and has been especially adept at handling financial and budgetary issues. He has been a point person for the Clark Avenue School project most recently.

City Elections for the open seat will take place in the fall of 2015.

The news is rather fresh, though there have been rumblings for quite some time, and so no one has really made themselves known as an interested party for the open seat just yet.

Naturally, Deborah Washington could figure into such a race – as she finished just behind Hatleberg in the 2013 City Election.

Others have mentioned that Council President Matt Frank could be interested in moving up from a District Councillor spot to an at-Large spot, though he didn’t express any interest directly.

Bob Bishop – a former City Clerk – cannot be discounted and has a nice base in Prattville.

And naturally, there is always room for a political newcomer or local activist to take a shot at an open seat.

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Primary Showdown

Primary Showdown

On Tuesday, Sept. 9 incumbent State Representative Dan Ryan, of Charlestown will square off against challenger Roy Avellaneda, of Chelsea, for the Second Suffolk House District, which covers Charlestown and Chelsea.

This week the Independent Newspaper Group submitted a questionaire to both candidates on some of the major issues facing the neighborhood.

Here are their responses:

Chelsea Record (CR): Immigration issues are pretty much front and center in Chelsea and have been for a long time. However, the recent surge of immigrants over the last year from Central American countries – via the southern U.S. border – has posed quite a challenge to Chelsea schools and resources. As state representative, what do you believe you can do to assist with this new situation on the streets and in the schools, and should Chelsea have to bear this entire burden?Rep. Dan Ryan

Rep. Dan Ryan (DR): Our national politics have failed us on the immigration issue. Until they get their act together down in Washington the task of taking care of these children falls on us. The state must find the resources to reimburse our cities and towns for these added expenses. We also have to find a way to get the Feds to pay for it. I didn’t fully understand the extent of how many children were coming into the U.S. and making their way to our neighborhoods until the processing piece brought it to a head.

My federal experience gave me a better understanding, at least from a policy level, of the request by the President to possibly process unaccompanied children in Massachusetts. I knew it would be a polarizing issue. I addressed it with my heart as much as my intellect. When I got the notice that the Governor was holding a press conference I made sure to be there. Looking back, I believe I may have been one of the only legislators in the room. I’ve learned from one of the best to take tough issues head on. I went to my desk and posted to Facebook my support for the Governor’s decision and the info sheets should anyone have questions. You can still read the responses. I know I probably lost some votes that day but if I turned one heart it was worth it.

My experience puts me in a great position to bring federal stakeholders into the conversation. They seemed to be an uninvited missing piece to the community meetings I went to since being elected.

CR: For more than a decade, there has been a push to give illegal immigrants in the state legal driver’s licenses. There are legitimate arguments on both sides of the issue. Now, it appears that the issue will surface again in the near future. What is your stance on allowing driver’s licenses for people who don’t are not legally documented in the U.S.?

DR: On one occasion during the first campaign I was asked by a reporter about this issue in Charlestown. He was told that I wouldn’t answer that question the same way in Charlestown as I would in Chelsea. I found that odd. Anyway, my response was, “Yes, I do believe they should be eligible for driver’s licenses. I also don’t believe it is an immigration issue. I believe it is a transportation issue and a road safety issue”. I was surprised as a legislator to find out that the bill in question was in the transportation committee. It makes sense when you think about it. I knew the issue well but not the legislative details. My instincts served me well.

My candid response also prompted the reporter to blog that, “Ryan is not afraid to address any issue. He is articulate and as knowledgeable on the issues as any candidate I have seen in the four Suffolk Specials”. I used his line in my literature.

One of the first meetings I had at the State House was with the Police Chiefs from around the state, with Chief Keyes being one of them. I was able to hear some of law enforcements concerns with the bill. I believe there are pieces that can be worked out. My feeling was that many in law enforcement are at least open to discussion going into the next legislative session.

CR: The streets in Chelsea, particularly Broadway and other thoroughfares, are in rough shape. Some areas even have cobblestone showing from generations ago. Money is tight, and the City has gotten to projects when it can. However, there isn’t enough to go around to take care of all the needs in a City where more and more cars travel the streets every year. What can you, as state rep., do to help City’s like Chelsea solve their street repair woes?

DR: The Feds aren’t paying for much these days. When I worked in Washington the one thing both parties could agree to spend money on was roads and bridges. Transportation appropriations were never a bone of contention. Whether you are a big businessman, a small farmer or a soccer mom just about everyone used to agree that you can’t build a bridge or pave a road without the government’s help. This lack of highway and transit money trickles down to municipalities bearing the brunt. We have increased local aid which may help a little.

One thing I caution about is Question 1 on the state ballot this November. The bill pertains to repealing the state gas tax indexed to inflation. In repealed it could cost the State billions in much needed road repair money spent in our cities and towns. My biggest fear is that an uninformed public will go to the voting both in November and feel good about voting against taxes. But, this is a tax that business, labor and every rational thinking person that knows the issue agrees upon. Vote “NO” on Question 1 if you want more money to fix your local streets and bridges.

CR: Chelsea is in dire need of a new middle school, and the Clark Avenue School is currently on the drawing board with state funding approval. However, once the fine print was read, things got a lot more expensive and state funding didn’t cover everything. Now Chelsea is in a predicament with surging costs on the new school. Do you have any ideas about how to ease the pain of this situation from the state level?

DR: I have met with Superintendent Burke and members of the school committee and am well aware of this issue with the funding formula. Senator DiDomedico, Rep Vincent and I can work with the incoming State Treasurer and Governor to help address this funding shortfall or get a legislative fix if need be.

CR: Casinos are on the horizon in Chelsea. No matter who gets the license, Chelsea is going to be a surrounding community. Also looming on the horizon is a November vote to repeal casino gaming altogether. Do you support the repeal, and if so, why? If not, what project do you prefer and why?

DR: As a State Representative, I find that it my responsibility to make sure my district is protected regardless of where a casino is located. I will work with whatever company is awarded a gaming license. According to the gaming law, municipalities negotiate the surrounding community agreements not the legislature. This entire process has got people’s logic warped. I’m not allowed to advocate a for a state contract to go to one software company over another or one paving company over another because they offered money to my constituency. Why is this different? It is a lot easier for a candidate to make noise. I am now an elected official and will continue to act like one on all state contracts. I spent the Kentucky Derby in Charlestown with a room full of constituents not as a guest of a casino applicant, like my opponent.

I will also add that my position is one of consistency. I was not against gaming before a site was proposed a mile from the house where I am raising my three children. So, I am not against gaming now. I didn’t wait until the day after a host community vote to declare my position. My position has been the same from the beginning. That position is: “if done correctly, I believe the Boston area can benefit from a luxury gaming resort”. In fact, other than those people who were against all gaming in Massachusetts from the beginning, a position I respect, I truly believe my position has been and will continue to be the most consistent in the State. I have not wavered or switched my opinion. I want the roads and bridges in Charlestown and Chelsea fixed regardless if there is a casino or not or where it is located.

CR: Chelsea has miles of waterfront, but during most of its recent history – and still today – that waterfront has been locked away from residents. Many young people don’t even know they live in a waterfront community. Certain projects like the PORT Park have changed that, but there is still a lot of area – some state-owned properties – that make the water inaccessible. What can you, as a state rep., do to help make the City’s waterfront more accessible?

DR: Repurposing old industrial waterfront property is an issue being looked at throughout the coast of the Bay State. I believe we need to find a way to make mixed use residential and commercial spaces compatible with Marine Industry, which is still a vital piece of our state’s economy. Parks such as Port Park and Piers Park in East Boston serve as nice buffers and allow access for recreation. Artists’ communities also seem to work as buffers from heavy marine industry. Right now the restrictions on re-zoning are far too cumbersome and do not allow for adequate master-planning. For us to fully utilize our coastline we have to look to streamline state and federal zoning so that we are not revitalizing one parcel at a time. I have also proposed a Mystic River Water Shuttle in some of my discussions. We need to connect workers and shoppers to the jobs and goods at Assembly Row and the office buildings in Charlestown. This is a natural commute.

Chelsea Record (CR): Immigration issues are pretty much front and center in Chelsea and have been for a long time. However, the recent surge of immigrants over the last year from Central American countries – via the southern U.S. border – has posed quite a challenge to Chelsea schools and resources. As state representative, what do you believe you can do to assist with this new situation on the streets and in the schools, and should Chelsea have to bear this entire burden?

Roy Avellaneda(RA): As a result of the recent surge of migrant children, Chelsea is experiencing a strain in its municipal budget. The strain would have been greater had it not been for the great collaboration of community resources. However, Chelsea deserves and should receive more state and federal aid in response to a situation far outside its control. As State Representative I would advocate for that state aid and reach out to federal officials for the same.

CR: For more than a decade, there has been a push to give illegal immigrants in the state legal driver’s licenses. There are legitimate arguments on both sides of the issue. Now, it appears that the issue will surface again in the near future. What is your stance on allowing driver’s licenses for people who don’t are not legally documented in the U.S.?

RA: We have not seen Immigration Reform at the Federal Level since Ronald Reagan was in office. In the meanwhile, states have had to find ways to deal with immigration issues for themselves. I support the licensing of undocumented residents. I believe it to be a public safety issue. I prefer to have the public and law authorities know of all who are living here and driving on our roads and that all drivers are trained and insured.

CR: The streets in Chelsea, particularly Broadway and other thoroughfares, are in rough shape. Some areas even have cobblestone showing from generations ago. Money is tight, and the City has gotten to projects when it can. However, there isn’t enough to go around to take care of all the needs in a City where more and more cars travel the streets every year. What can you, as state rep., do to help cities like Chelsea solve their street repair woes?

RA: As State Representative, I can advocate for increased authorization of Chapter 90 funding for Chelsea to maintain, repair and improve its roads. Ch. 90 is a 100% reimbursable and essential source of funding so that main thoroughfares such as Broadway can be repaired in a more timely fashion.

CR: Chelsea is in dire need of a new middle school, and the Clark Avenue School is currently on the drawing board with state funding approval. However, once the fine print was read, things got a lot more expensive and state funding didn’t cover everything. Now Chelsea is in a predicament with surging costs on the new school. Do you have any ideas about how to ease the pain of this situation from the state level?

RA: The Legislative intent of the School Building Reinbursement Fund was for municipalities to receive 80% funding. As State representative I would review the situation and application for reimbursement first with city officials and later with members from the Mass School Building Authority. It is these in discussions that I would try to mitigate the differences and attempt to include costs that were not originally covered in the application. Additionally, I would seek clarification so that this does not occur to any other applicant in the future.

CR: Casinos are on the horizon in Chelsea. No matter who gets the license, Chelsea is going to be a surrounding community. Also looming on the horizon is a November vote to repeal casino gaming altogether. Do you support the repeal, and if so, why? If not, what project do you prefer and why?

RA: I have said that the repeal is a half hearted effort to limit gambling. We would still have the lottery, scratch tickets, horse racing and bingo with a two full resort casinos an hour away. I therefore do not support half hearted measures and will vote no on the Casino Repeal question.

Without a doubt the upcoming decision of the Mass Gaming Commission on which of the two casino proposals, Wynn Casino in Everett or Mohegan Sun in Revere, is the most pressing issue facing Charlestown and Chelsea right now. I support the Chelsea City Council and have advocated to the Mass Gaming Commission that the Mohegan Sun proposal be approved. The Mohegan Sun proposal offers greater dollar mitigation packages to Chelsea and other surrounding communities. It also has less impact overall to traffic due to its two onsite Blue line stations, ample onsite parking and higher dollar amount spent on traffic redesign along Rt 1A and Rt 16.

CR: Chelsea has miles of waterfront, but during most of its recent history – and still today – that waterfront has been locked away from residents. Many young people don’t even know they live in a waterfront community. Certain projects like the PORT Park have changed that, but there is still a lot of area – some state-owned properties – that make the water inaccessible. What can you, as a state rep., do to help make the City’s waterfront more accessible?

RA: I have seen legislation passed that allowed other areas of the Boston Harbor be de-designated as Port zoning. This legislation allowed waterfront areas to be used for non-industrial water dependent uses. As State Representative, I would sponsor and advocate for similar language in waterfront areas of Chelsea if it was supported by a City Council Home Rule Petition or a Master Plan.

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September 9:Primary Primer

September 9:Primary Primer

With all of the candidates running for so many offices in the upcoming Primary Election next Tuesday, Sept. 9, things have gotten more than a little confusing for voters – especially on the Democratic side. Below is a listing of the races and those running.

Democrat:

•U.S. Senator (unopposed)

Ed Markey, Malden

•Governor

Don Berwick, Newton

Martha Coakley, Medford

Steven Grossman, Newton

•Lt. Governor

Leland Chung, Cambridge

Stephen Kerrigan, Lancaster

Michael Lake, Boston

•Attorney General

Maura Healy, Charlestown

Warren Tolman, Watertown

•Secretary of State (unopposed)

Bill Galvin

•Treasurer

Tom Conroy, Wayland

Barry Finegold, Andover

Deb Goldberg, Brookline

•Auditor (unopposed)

Suzanne Bump, Great Barrington

•U.S. Congress

Katherine Clark, Melrose

Sheldon Schwartz, Lexington

•Governor’s Council (unopposed)

Terence Kennedy, Lynnfield

•State Senator (unopposed)

Sal DiDomenico, Everett

•State Representative – 16th Suffolk (unopposed)

RoseLee Vincent, Revere

•State Representative – 2nd Suffolk

Dan Ryan, Charlestown

Roy Avellaneda, Chelsea

•Suffolk Country District Attorney (unopposed)

Dan Conley

•Suffolk Registrar of Probate

Patty Campatelli, East Boston

Felix Arroyo, Boston

Richard Joyce, Boston

David Keenan, Boston

Martin Keough, Boston

John Sepulveda, Boston

•Suffolk County Sheriff

Steven Tompkins, Boston

Doug Bennett, Boston

Jeremiah Goodwin Sr., Revere

Republican:

•U.S. Senate (unopposed)

Brian Herr, Hopkinton

•Governor

Charlie Baker, Swampscott

Mark Fisher, Shrewsbury

•Lt. Governor

Karyn Polito, Shrewsbury

•Attorney General

John Miller, Winchester

•Secretary of State

David D’Arcangelo, Malden

•Treasurer

Michael Heffernan, Wellesley

•Auditor

Patricia St. Aubin, Norfolk

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Correction:UFCW Miscommunicated on Solidarity Fund

Correction:UFCW Miscommunicated on Solidarity Fund

In a front page story in last week’s Chelsea Record, it was stated that the Chelsea Collaborative and the United Food and Commercial Workers Union (UFCW) had banded together to create a solidarity fund that would be distributed to out-of-work Market Basket employees.

That, however, was not the case and it appears that the national union did not have full information prior to making the announcement.

Chelsea Collaborative Director Gladys Vega said she had only agreed to allow UFCW to use office space at the Collaborative to distribute the funds and had never agreed to be part of a solidarity fund.

“We had no knowledge of this announcement and were not part of this effort, except we gave them approval for limited access to office space so they could distribute to workers from a central location,” said Vega. “We were not and are not part of the solidarity fund and cancelled our minimal involvement after learning of this. We stood with the Market Basket employees and still do.”

The UFCW on Tuesday issued a correction apologizing for jumping the gun on the announcement.

“An earlier version of this release incorrectly identified the Chelsea Collaborative as a partner in establishing the solidarity fund for Market Basket workers,” read the correction. “Although Chelsea Collaborative office space was used to distribute solidarity funds on Aug. 25 and 29, the Chelsea Collaborative does not control or administer the fund. Market Basket workers with further questions regarding the solidarity fund can contact marketbasket@ufcw.org. Unfortunately our office had a miscommunication on the role of the Chelsea Collaborative with the solidarity fund. We apologize for the inconvenience.”

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Truck Crash Revere Brown Circle

Truck Crash Revere Brown Circle

At approximately 11:30 a.m. today a tractor-trailer dump truck hauling sand to the Winthrop Beach revitalization project rolled over at Brown Circle rotary in Revere, spilling its load across the roadway.

Revere Police have primary jurisdiction of the rotary and conducted the main crash investigation. The Massachusetts State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Section (our Truck Team) also responded and examined the truck for compliance with federal and state motor carrier laws.

The truck (1994 Peterbilt tractor pulling a 2009 dump-truck style trailer) is owned by HM Morales Trucking, Inc., of Chelsea. The operator was Miguel Hernandez, 23. He was injured and transported.

The truck was hauling fill from Saugus to Winthrop at the time of the crash.

As a result of the State Police Truck Team investigation, the truck company, HM Morales Trucking, was cited for the following:

- For the tractor: insufficient brake linings on the left side of the first axle and defective brakes on the right side of the third axle.

- For the trailer: Defects in the fourth axle (cracked air bag supports, both sides) and fifth axle (cracked air bag supports, both sides); and expired inspection sticker.

Brown Circle was closed for approximately 2 hours. Preliminary investigation indicates excessive speed for the rotary was a factor in the crash. Please check with Revere Police as to whether the operator was cited for speeding or anything else.

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