MBTA Better Bus Kick-Off

MBTA Better Bus Kick-Off

Steve Poftak, who has been the MBTA General Manager for about a month, expresses his commitment to Chelsea during the inaugural Chelsea Transportation Task Force meeting at City Hall on Thursday, Jan. 24. The Task Force plans to continue meeting for the next six months regarding MBTA issues and the Better Buses program.

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Wingin’ It for Super Bowl Liii: Chef Husbands Talks the Perfect Wing

Wingin’ It for Super Bowl Liii: Chef Husbands Talks the Perfect Wing

There is no shortage of Super Bowl parties going on in Chelsea this weekend, but if one wants their party to score high, they better know how to prepare a proper chicken wing.

Chef/Pitmaster Andy Husbands of The Smoke Shop (located in Assembly Row in Somerville) said that if hosts think getting a good wing on the table for the Super Bowl is as easy as popping them in a hot oven, they would be flapping wrong.

In fact, he said, the key to a good Super Bowl spread is preparation and thinking ahead.

“Wings are so subjective,” he said. “Do you like the small ones or the big roaster wings? I go for the big roasting ones. You want the big, roaster wings. I’d also advise everyone to go early. Don’t go to the store to buy your wings on Saturday. They’ll all be sold out and you’ll get stuck with the small wings…Most everything you serve for the Super Bowl except for ribs can be done on Saturday. That makes it so much easier. You want it to be enough food for everybody, but you want it to be easy for you too. You don’t want to be in the kitchen saucing wings when the Pats are scoring.”

Husbands said the centerpiece of a Super Bowl spread always has to be the wings, so getting them right is important.

Husbands suggests doing what is called a confit.

“You want the best wings, and even though it’s a bit complicated, I would look up how to confit wings,” he said.

When he pulls it off, Husbands said he starts by seasoning the raw wings the day before with salt and other flavorings. Many make the mistake, he said, of putting the sauce – whether buffalo or teriyaki sauce – on before cooking the wings. One should not do that, he said.

“That will hamper the wings,” he said. “Sugars burn quickly, and you don’t want that burnt taste on the wings.”

Once seasoned, Husbands coats the wings in oil and chicken or goose fat. Then they go into a 205-degree oven until cooked. Then, take them out, let them cool and remove the fat. The next day, before the big game, take them out of the refrigerator and use the fat from the previous day on a sheet pan. Put the wings in the fat and cook them in an oven at 350 degrees until crispy.

“They become crispy and rich and then you apply the sauce, whether Frank’s Red Hot or Szechuan – whatever you want,” he said. “That’s a fun way to do it.”

There are, of course, other ways to wing it for the big game.

Home frying, however, is not something Husbands recommends. Most people don’t have the right equipment and it uses a ton of fat for just one dish.

Cooking them in the oven after seasoning is another option, but it has to be on low heat. A common mistake, he said, is putting the wings in the oven raw at a high temperature to get them crispy. However, that leads to a dry and bony wing – perhaps even raw.

“You want to put them on very low heat and continuously turning them gets them crispy on the outside and keeps them juicy on the inside,” he said. “After they’re cooked (150 degree temperature inside), you can crank up the oven to 450 degrees and flash them in until really crispy. Then you sauce them up. That way you get them fully cooked and crispy. No one wants raw chicken.”

Yet another way goes to the die-hards, who will take the opportunity to do some arctic grilling. Husbands said the cold weather won’t stop him from grilling wings and smoking ribs for his Super Bowl party.

“I’m absolutely going to be outside,” he said. “My neighbors all know me well. They don’t look at me like I’m crazy. It’s more like they want to know if they can have some. It’s a passion and if you know it love it you want to do it all the time in any weather. I have a Traeger grill and a Big Green Egg grill and they work in all types of weather. I might use both of them this time.”

Beyond the meat of the matter, though, Husbands has some good ideas for buffet style options.

One of those ideas is a chili bar. He usually cooks a pot of chili and leaves it on low in the Crock Pot, setting up a chili fixin’s salad bar next to it.

“What’s cool about chili is you can keep it in the Crock Pot, keep it hot and put out a bunch of toppings – like crushed Fritos, crushed tortilla chips, scallions, sour cream and anything else you like,” he said. “People can come back and forth to that during the entire game.”

At halftime, he rolls out a hot dog bar too.

Either grilled or boiled, he selects quality hot dogs and two different kinds of buns. From there, the sky is the limit on the kinds of toppings one can offer to guests. Husbands suggests kimchee, several different types of mustard, cheese sauce, unique pickle relishes and even his own favorite, sriracha ketchup.

“Guests can have fun making their own hot dog,” he said. “You can wheel that out at halftime for something new. All of it can be prepared ahead of time too.”

For the beer lovers, Husbands suggests not going all lawnmower and not going all high-brow either. In his ice chest, he said he offers everything from Miller High Life to Trillium Brewery.

“It’s important to have something for everyone,” he said. “I don’t want to push my passion for craft beer on someone who wants a High Life. A High Life can be just as enjoyable as a craft beer.”

Super Bowl LIII official coverage starts at 6 p.m. on CBS. Andy Husbands is an award-winning chef and pitmaster at The Smoke House, which has locations in Assembly Row, the Seaport and Cambridge. Just this year he closed down his long-time South End restaurants Tremont 647 and Sister Sorel – which were neighborhood staples for decades.

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Chelsea High School Principal Gives Back to the Community on His 50th Birthday

Chelsea High School Principal Gives Back to the Community on His 50th Birthday

Early in the morning on Saturday January 5th with a team of of 13 men Principal Mathews arrived at Salvation Army Chelsea loaded with tools and all the materials ready to do a transformation..

Captain Isael Gonzalez, the Pastor of Salvation Army remarks, how excited he was to see a team of professionals lawyers, teachers, principals, and investors who unselfishly dedicated their time accomplishing major repairs.

The day started at 7:00 a.m. shopping for needed items at Home Depot and ended about 5:30 p.m.

Captain Brenda Gonzalez expressed, the highlight for the weekend for her was the fact that some of Principal Mathews’s friends traveled from different states to celebrate his birthday in a very unusual way. His friends are Kevin Qazilbash (Lawrence Principal), Evan MacAlew (Somerville Teacher), Josh Bowman (Lawyer),Drew Kodjak (Environmental lawyer), Bill O’Flanagan (Retired Principal), Mike Sabin (Waltham Principa), Seth Alexander (investing), Tom Nolan (investing), Alexlander Mathews (CHS Principal Chelsea), Bouke Noordji, Steven Cornielsen, Mark Nichols, and Dave Daglio.

They demonstrated humility and willingness to serve without any fanfare. They really wanted to give back to the community using their own resources and skills. They hired a local contractor to replace and install carpet in the front office. They replaced ceiling tiles in the kitchen and high ceiling tiles at the gym door exit. They painted the kids club classrooms and the hallways. They sanded and ceiled the wood rails along the stairway and replaced the baseboard trims.

When the kids arrived, they were so excited and happy to see the big change in their newly painted classrooms. Principal Mathews and team of friends, including the Salvation Army congregation, the Chelsea Interfaith Alliance and the entire community say Happy, Happy Birthday to you. Thank you very much for giving back to the community on your special day.

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Text 9-1-1 Service Now Available in Massachusetts

Text 9-1-1 Service Now Available in Massachusetts

The Massachusetts State 9-1-1 Department is pleased to announce that Text to 911is now available throughout the Commonwealth. All Massachusetts 9-1-1 call centers now have ability to receive a text message through their 9-1-1 system. The Baker-Polito Administration has supported making these system enhancements since 2015.

Text to 9-1-1 allows those in need of emergency services to use their cellular device to contact 9-1-1 when they are unable to place a voice call.
“This is a significant improvement to our 9-1-1 system that will save lives,” said Public Safety and Security Secretary Tom Turco. “By giving those requiring emergency services this option we are greatly expanding the ability of first responders to provide critical assistance to those in need.”
To contact emergency services by text message, simply enter 9-1-1 in the “To” field of your mobile device and then type your message into the message field. It is the same process that is used for sending a regular text message from your mobile device. It is important to make every effort to begin the text message indicating the town you are in and provide the best location information that you can. “Having the ability to contact a 9-1-1 call center by text could help those being held against their will or victims of domestic violence unable to make a voice call,” said Frank Pozniak, Executive Director of the State 9-1-1 Department. “Text to 9-1-1 also provides direct access to 9-1-1 emergency services for the deaf, hard of hearing and speech-impaired, which is a service that these communities did not have access to until now.”
It is important to note that the 9-1-1 call center may not always have your exact location when they receive your text. For this reason, when sending a Text to 9-1-1 it is important to make every effort to begin the text message indicating the town you are in and provide the best location information that you can.
The State 9-1-1 Department encourages citizens to Text to 9-1-1 only when a voice call is not possible.
Remember: “Call if you can, text if you can’t.”

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Free Exploratory Program at Voke Aimed for Non-Vocational Students

Free Exploratory Program at Voke Aimed for Non-Vocational Students

Northeast Metro Tech is once again opening its doors to non-vocational high school students interested in learning more about technical education.

Through its “Exploring Vocational and Career Technical Pathways,” Northeast is offering a 12-week program for in-district students in grades nine through 12 not currently enrolled at the school to expand their knowledge in one of 13 tech programs.

This is the second year of the program, which is made possible through a $100,000 Cummings Foundation grant that will be used over four years.

“We take our role as our communities’ alternative high school option very seriously,” Principal Carla Scuzzarella said. “This grant provides us with the means to offer vocational and technical opportunities for students who are thinking about options for their future.”

Divided into three four-week programs, students in Northeast’s district who sign up for Exploring Vocational and Career Technical Pathways are welcomed to the school on Saturdays to experience a number of career pathways. The free courses are led by a Northeast instructor and participants get an abridged version of each shop’s curriculum.

Given the success of last year’s pilot program, Northeast is now offering courses in nearly all of its tech programs — automotive technology, business technology, drafting and design, carpentry, cosmetology, culinary arts, design and visual communications, electrical, health assisting, heating, ventilation and air conditioning/refrigeration, metal fabrication, plumbing and robotics.

“Teachers saw the positive impact this program had on communities during our pilot program and wanted to become more involved,” Program Director Joe O’Brien Jr. said. “This is a great opportunity for students who are interested in one, two or three areas of technical study to learn more and gain valuable skills that can be applied in college or a career.”

Additionally, as part of a $106,320 Skills Capital Grant Northeast received earlier this month, the school will expand the drafting and design program for participants through updated equipment and advanced software.

The first of three sessions will begin on Feb. 2 and continue on Feb. 9, Feb. 16 and March 2. Session two will run from March 9-30 (Saturdays only) and session three begins on April 6, and meets on April 13, April 27 and May 4.

Students can attend all three sessions for free, and pick three different shops to explore, or stick with one for 12 weeks. Transportation to Northeast is not provided.

To apply, students should fill out an application here and email it to O’Brien at jobrien@northeastmetrotech.com, or mail it to the school at:

Northeast Metro Tech

Attn: Joe O’Brien Jr.

100 Hemlock Road

Wakefield, MA 01880 Applicants should apply prior to the start of each session. Those who apply in the middle of a session will be placed in the following session. Anyone with questions should contact O’Brien at jobrien@northeastmetrotech.com or 781-246-0810.

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Police Briefs 01-31-2019

Police Briefs 01-31-2019

MIDDLE SCHOOLER ARRESTED FOR KNIFE ATTACK

On January 14, officers responded to a matter being investigated by the School Resource Officers alleging an assault by means of a dangerous weapon, a knife. Officers spoke to a juvenile male who reported being assaulted by another juvenile male while heading home from the Browne Middle School. As the result of this investigation, an identification was made of a 14-year-old juvenile male suspect that was taken into custody a short time later. No injuries reported, and no weapon was recovered. Officers are continuing to work with the schools for ongoing safety concerns.

A 14-year-old juvenile was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (knife) and assault and battery.

SCREAMING AT BUSES

On Jan. 15, around 11:33 p.m., officers were called to assist an MBTA bus driver for unruly female shouting at passing cars. Officers arrived and encountered said female shouting obscenities at officers. Despite efforts to calm her down, she continued her tirade and was placed into custody for disorderly person without further incident.

Krysten Kulch, 32, of 58 Garfield Ave., was charged with disorderly conduct.

HEROIN DEALER FROM GARFIELD AVE BUSTED

On Thursday, Jan. 17, detectives were conducting an ongoing drug investigation in the Prattville area after complaints were received. Detectives arranged to contact a potential source of narcotics and subsequently arranged a purchase to be made. After the suspect agreed to meet the officers to sell narcotics at a prearranged spot, the officers observed him to arrive. He met the undercover officer to exchange an amount of US currency for what appeared to be Heroin. The suspect was taken into custody without further incident.

Jose Gonzalez, 48, 105 Garfield Ave., was charged with distribution of a Class A drug (heroin) and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

DRUG DEAL WITNESSED

Officers received a call from dispatch regarding a drug transaction that was witnessed by a civilian in Bellingham Square. Based on the phone call and independent observations corroborating this tip, Officers encountered two individuals at the McDonalds in Bellingham Square. Officers then conducted an independent investigation and developed probable cause to arrest one subject for the Distribution of a Class C Substance as well as an outstanding warrant from the Roxbury District Court. The second subject was identified and criminal charges are being sought for the Possession of Class C. William Falasca, 34, of Medford, was charged with distribution of a Class C drug and one warrant.

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Thank You, Bob Deleo

Thank You, Bob Deleo

It’s hard to believe that it has been 10 years since Winthrop/Revere State Rep. Bob DeLeo was elected the Speaker of the House by his colleagues. (Yes, time flies.)

We wish to make note of the 10th anniversary of Speaker DeLeo’s ascension to that post because it was marked by two significant events that occurred in January, 2009.

First, Bob was chosen by his colleagues after a succession of House Speakers had been forced to resign because of various scandals, the last having been Sal DiMasi, who was indicted on corruption charges by federal prosecutors for which DiMasi eventually was convicted and sentenced to time in federal prison.

The second was that Bob assumed the Speakership amidst the greatest economic downturn to face not only Massachusetts, but the entire country (and the world) since the Great Depression.

Needless to say, January of 2009 was a difficult period for anyone to become Speaker of the House, given the history of the House during the previous decade and the enormity of the challenges that the state was facing.

However, from the perspective of looking back over the past 10 years, it is fair to say that Bob DeLeo has been more responsible both for restoring the people’s faith in our legislature and for guiding our state through an incredibly-difficult fiscal

period than any other person in state government.

Governors have come and gone, as have State Senate presidents, but the one constant has been the steady hand of Bob DeLeo at the helm of the House of Representatives.

Not only has Bob DeLeo been the principal architect of a state budget process that has been both prudent and forward-looking, but he, more than any other person on Beacon Hill, has been able to bring together disparate groups and has worked with both the Senate and Republican administrations to create an atmosphere of collegiality that is unparalleled in our nation today. The achievements in our state over the past decade under the Speakership of Bob DeLeo are a testament to the ability of one person to have a profound effect upon the lives of the people he serves — and Massachusetts unquestionably is a better place thanks to Bob DeLeo’s tenure as Speaker of the House for the past 10 years.

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Sports 01-31-2019

Sports 01-31-2019

CHS Sports Roundup

CHS TRACK TEAMS DROP FIRST CONTESTS

The Chelsea High boys and girls indoor track teams dropped their first meets of the season last week to Greater Lawrence.

The outcome of the Lady Red Devils’ contest came down to the final race, the 4 x 400 relay. Chelsea held a 41-40 lead entering the relay, but Greater Lawrence won the race to win the meet by a score of 45-41.

Highlights from girls meet included:

1st and third in the high hurdles: Stephanie Simon, Sandra Tun

1st and third in the 50 yard dash: Stephanie Simon, Sandra Tun

1st in the 300: Ana Chang

1st in the 600: Yarelis Torres Diaz

1st in the High Jump: Stephanie Simon

1st in the mile: Yarid Deras

On the boys’ side, the Red Devils came up short by a score of 54-31. The highlights for Chelsea were:

1st in Shot Put: Rigo Flores

1st in the 600: Jazmany Reyes

1st, 2nd, 3rd in mile: Jazmany Reyes, Oscar Amaya, Ian Padilla

1st, 2nd in 1000: Justin Turner, Limilson Tavares

SIMON WINS LONG JUMP AT STATE COACHES

Chelsea High track star Stephanie Simon captured the long jump event at this past weekend’s State Coaches Meet, an event that features the top athletes in Division 1, with a leap of 18′-0.75″, a distance that qualified Stephanie for the nationals.

Teammate Ana Chang turned in a strong performance in the 300 dash, finishing in 20th place among a field of 58 competitors. For the boys, Red Devil Justin Turner improved his two-mile school record from 10:18 to 10:13.36.

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Senior Center Quilters Have Been Creating for 25 Years

Senior Center Quilters Have Been Creating for 25 Years

The Chelsea Senior Center Quilting Group, formerly known as the Empty Spoolers, makes about 12 quilts a month to be sent to disadvantaged children and babies. The group traces its origins back more than 25 years.

The Chelsea Senior Center isn’t known as a textile manufacturer, but truth be told, a case could be made on the second floor for the quilting group that has been meeting for 25 years – producing an incredible 12 homemade quilts per month.

The quilters have long ties back to the original Empty Spoolers, who started quilting at the Center even longer than 25 years ago.

The group is so established that some of the newer members have had a previous generation put their hand to the quilting club – with their mothers or another family member having had participated in the original group.

With the great work of Eileen Gregory (original member), Angela Panaresse (original member) Irene Malachowski (original member), Bunny Shuman, Louise Finnegan, Cathy DeVitto, Pat Doucette, Jackie Mackay, Elaine Patti, Anita Arsenault, and Ana Garcia, the group makes approximately a dozen quilts per month – no small feat.

The quilts are made with care because they are made for disadvantaged youths and babies. After they are finished, they are shipped out to babies and young children that are under the care of the Boston Medical Center, Mass. Dept. of Children and Family (DCF-Chelsea) and they have gone as far as Armenia. The quilters are open to visitors, and the public is encouraged to come see how they work. Anyone who would like to stop by the Senior Center to view some of the work and talk with the Empty Spoolers can do so every Friday from 9 a.m. – noon.

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Freezin’ for a Reason: Chelsea Rotarian Joe Panetta Will Jump into the Atlantic for Polio Eradication

Freezin’ for a Reason: Chelsea Rotarian Joe Panetta Will Jump into the Atlantic for Polio Eradication

Rotary District 7930 will hold its 9th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, February 9th, at Long Beach in Gloucester. The event is part of Rotary International’s ongoing campaign to eradicate polio in our lifetime. More than 300 people are expected to plunge into the cold waters off Cape Ann this year including the Rotary Club of Chelsea. Last year, over 250 people braved the icy waters, raising more than $100,000 and welcoming Rotarians, friends, and family members from 45 Rotary Clubs.

Since 1985, Polio has become the signature cause for Rotary International as it has teamed up with partners including The Global Poverty Project, The Global Eradication Initiative, The World Health Organization, and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Since that time, more than a billion dollars have been raised among Rotary clubs worldwide and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. When Rotary International took on the battle against this disease, more than 350,000 people spanning 125 countries were impacted. Today there are three countries left where it has not been eradicated – Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. However, due to combined targeted efforts and donations,

Nigeria reported no new cases of polio in 2018 and the number of total cases last year fell to just 29 worldwide!

Again, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged a 2:1 match for every dollar Rotarians raise toward eradication efforts. For as little as $0.60, a donation can make the difference in changing a person’s life. Please support your local Rotarians as they brave the icy waters off Gloucester to help eradicate polio in our lifetime. The Chelsea Club has set a goal at $1000 to aid in the district’s goal of raising $250,000. The district is utilizing an electronic fundraising process. Supporters are encouraged to log on to Chelsea Rotary’s team page and make a donation to help Rotarians lead the way to eradicate this dreaded disease. https://app.mobilecause.com/vf/polio/team/Chelsea

For more information on how the Rotary Club of Chelsea serves the local and global community, visit chelsearotary.org or contact the club at mfoley@xsshotels.com

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