Councillor Wants Answers on 5th St Onramp

Councillor Wants Answers on 5th St Onramp

By Seth Daniel

The upcoming Chelsea Viaduct state highway project may include plans to eliminate the 5th Street onramp next to the Williams School, and Councillor Roy Avellaneda said he wants answers about the plan.

Avellaneda said at the Nov. 20 Council meeting that he has learned that MassDOT is considering closing down the onramp, which he said is critical for making sure the downtown and Everett Avenue are not flooded with vehicle traffic at certain times of the day.

“There is a proposal by MassDOT to close the 5th Street onramp to the Tobin Bridge at Arlington Street adjacent to the MITC Building,” he said. “They are talking…about doing away with it and eliminating it. It jumps off the page to me. I am wondering what impact that will have to the other two off-ramps and what kind of drastic impact it will have on our downtown.”

The MITC (Massachusetts Information Technology Center) Building is a state-owned building that houses computer technology and electronic records for the state. It has several hundreds employees.

A spokesman for MassDOT would not confirm or deny that there is a plan to take away the on-ramp. He said the plans are still in design for the overall viaduct project, and a public process with members of the community is underway.

A meeting took place earlier this month in Chelsea to discuss the project, which will begin in 2016.

“The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) is continuing to move forward with the design of the Chelsea Viaduct Rehabilitation Project and is committed to rehabilitating this important structure to ensure long term reliability throughout this area,” said the spokesman in a statement. “MassDOT has developed a comprehensive public participation plan that will engage local civic leaders and elected officials, area businesses and members of the community as well as commuters.”

The land where the onramp is located was actually taken by the Highway Department decades ago when the Tobin/Mystic Bridge was being constructed. That particular piece of land was the home to Union Park – a park that housed the Civil War statue now across the street from City Hall. The park was laid out in a “spoke” formation with all paths leading to the Civil War monument in the center. However, during the Bridge construction, it was part of a massive land-taking in Chelsea and was designated for highway use.

It’s on that basis where Avellaneda said he wants more information. He said he wants to know what the plan is for that land if the onramp is taken away. He said since it was taken by eminent domain for highway use, it should be returned to the City if it is no longer a highway use.

He said he has suspicions that the state just wants to use the land to create more parking for the MITC employees.

“Do they want to expand parking for the MITC?” he asked. “That land was taken by eminent domain for one purpose and that was for a highway. If the highway is no longer using it for a highway, that land should go back to the City. That land was taken away from Chelsea and should not go to the MITC for parking and for them to continue their spread. The plan for 5th Street needs to be found and any hidden agenda out there needs to be found.”

The Chelsea Viaduct is a structure which runs between the Tobin Bridge to where Route 1 crosses above County Road and the Viaduct carries traffic through the area known as the “Chelsea Curves.”

The Chelsea Viaduct is structurally deficient and in need of repair and rehabilitation in order to ensure the reliability of this important connection.

Working with the City of Chelsea, residents living near the Viaduct, roadway users, and other stakeholders, the project team is currently designing a plan for construction that minimizes and mitigates temporary construction impacts. MassDOT’s current schedule includes reaching the 25 percent design milestone before the end of this year, continuing design and related work throughout the winter, and then advertising the project to potential construction bidders in the spring of 2018.

When completed, the Viaduct Rehabilitation project will provide repairs to the structure’s supports and a new travel surface for vehicles traveling on it. Work on the viaduct will be coordinated with construction activities occurring as part of the separate Tobin Bridge Deck Rehabilitation Project.

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New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

By Seth Daniel

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

In years past, when it was severely cold, those living on the streets of Chelsea had nowhere to go but under blankets.

Some, as recently as last year, died because of exposure to the cold.

Now, to help prevent that and to give those on the streets a place to go during the day, the Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) has opened in the basement of the Light of Christ Church at 738 Broadway.

The Day Center is a partnership between Pastor Ricardo Valle and his church, as well as the City of Chelsea, Pastor Ruben Rodriguez, MGH Chelsea and CAPIC.

It is part of the overall effort to provide a place for those that hang out in Bellingham Square or under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge to go for services – things such as meals, clothing, hot showers, a bathroom and – occasionally – a shoulder to cry on. It’s also a resource that can be activated by the City overnight in times of extreme cold or extreme weather events.

It isn’t a new idea, but rather one Valle and others have been championing privately for a number of years. However, about three years ago, the City began to show a greater interest in partnering with Valle and others during a relentless cold snap. One particularly bad night, they put together a quick plan to partner with Valle and host those from the streets as a trial emergency measure.

It went so well that plans have been ongoing since then to get something official going. Now, that has happened.

Valle said the center has been open since Aug. 28, and so far things are working really well. In fact, SELAH is just about ready to get their full commercial kitchen working so they can provide on-site cooked meals every day, Monday through Friday.

“This is an investment with no monetary returns,” said Valle. “If someone is sick and they die, that’s terrible but we can accept that. If they die because they are out in the cold, we can do better than that. I have this space here and I believe everyone deserves a second chance and maybe this is the place where they can come find a second chance…We talk to them and try to get them to ask for help. Once they ask, we immediately have a team ready to get them the help they need to get out of this lifestyle.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said the population of homeless and vagrants in the city needed a place to go during the day. Many used to hang out in the Square all day, and it wasn’t compatible with the business district and nearby schools. However, there was nowhere else for them to go.

“We were really looking to partner to create a place so there’s a place people can go to get a shower and something to eat,” he said. “We hope it can be a helpful resource for our Navigators. There are now options that they didn’t have before. So far it’s doing pretty well.”

Ambrosino said the City was able to give the Center a grant of about $35,000 to build the showers and bathrooms. Meanwhile, other monies were directed to the operating budget from the Mass General neighborhood monies.

Bobby Soroka lived on the streets and under the Bridge for years until getting his own place recently. He started coming to the Day Center when it opened, and now he returns to help out as a volunteer.

“I liked what I saw when I came here and they needed help,” he said. “I was here anyway. Without this, they wouldn’t be able to shower. It’s a nice place to hand and especially with winter coming. Everybody gets along. There are no fights or problems.”

Valle said having the shower and ability to clean up is very important. He said they often find those coming in very deteriorated conditions. One man had his feet rotted, and couldn’t walk well. In general, he said, it has helped the hygiene of the community of homeless that frequent and live in Chelsea.

“A shower means a lot to them,” he said. “The first time we opened the center, it took 30 minutes and you could feel the smell. Now you come here and you don’t feel that because they have access to a shower five days a week. We had a man who came in to take a shower and he took his shoes off and his feet had deteriorated. He couldn’t walk and was using a stick to get around. It was bad and we see a lot of people in that condition.”

Soroka now has his own housing, but at night in the cold, he said he still is uneasy when he smells the air. It brings back really bad memories, and so he avoids going outside at night. He also said it helps him to continue to relate to what those at the Center are going through.

“It meant a lot to see them open this, especially a few years ago when they opened it during the cold,” he said. “I was under the Bridge then. I’m not one to go to a shelter. I’ll sleep outside first. I have a place, but I don’t like to go outside. That night air scares me to death. It makes me think I could be out there again. I hope not.”

The Day Center is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is in desperate need of volunteers, Valle said, and he hopes that more Chelsea people will step forward to help.

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Dog Owners to Rally Saturday in Kickoff for First Chelsea Off-Leash Park

Dog Owners to Rally Saturday in Kickoff for First Chelsea Off-Leash Park

By Seth Daniel

This little corner of Broadway and Commandants Way has been selected for the City’s first off-leash dog park for small to medium sized dogs.

This little corner of Broadway and Commandants Way has been selected for the City’s first off-leash dog park for small to medium sized dogs.

Get your paws to City Hall on Saturday, as dog owners across the City are invited to rally and parade down to Lower Broadway where the City is planning its first off-leash dog park.

The Paw-Raid event will start at City Hall Saturday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. From there, dogs and their owners will stroll down Broadway to the site of the proposed new park under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge.

The new dog park will be at the corner of Broadway and Commandants Way across from the Chelsea Yacht Club on a small, 2,000 sq. ft. corner of the newly-constructed Mystic Overlook Park – soon to be Chelsea’s first under-the-bridge open space.

“It’s a smaller park so it’s designed for smaller dogs,” said Planner Alex Train. “While we do have larger parks beside it, all of our parks in Chelsea mandate dogs be on a leash. This will be the first off-leash park in the City and will have about 2,000 sq. ft. for dogs to run around.”

The small park will be separated into two areas with a retaining wall and will have benches and a doggie water fountain. It will also include landscaping and other improvements.

The park is actually a gift to the City in many ways, with the Stanton Foundation of Cambridge footing – or “pawing” – 90 percent of the costs. The City only has to pay about 10 percent of the costs of the Park, which are being done in conjunction with the larger Mystic Overlook open space next door.

Train said the plan is to put the project to bid at the end of September and begin work in the fall. The hope is to have completion of it by late spring 2018.

The event on Saturday is designed by the City and the Chelsea Prospers movement to get a critical mass of dog owners who could serve as a “Friends” group to the park.

“It’s a celebratory event to make people fully aware of the construction schedule and get a gathering of dog owners to walk together down Broadway,” he said. “There will be a lot of ongoing maintenance that the City is hoping to share with any Friends of the Dog Park group that could form. We hope that we could collaborate with a Friends group to maintain and improve the dog park. We’re really trying to foster that congregation of dog owners with Saturday’s event.”

Train said that City leaders – and even planners like himself – have seen the need for more dog facilities.

“I’ve worked here for two years and the numbers of people I see with dogs is steadily increasing,” he said. “This is definitely needed.”

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A Comfortable Fit:Former School Committeewoman Lineweaver Brings a Wealth of Experiences to Kelly School

A Comfortable Fit:Former School Committeewoman Lineweaver Brings a Wealth of Experiences to Kelly School

By Seth Daniel

After having worked in Boston schools, and having also served on the Chelsea School Committee, Lisa Lineweaver is bringing her talents this year to the very school where her own kids go – the Kelly School.

Joining Principal Maggie Sanchez, Lineweaver came on earlier this summer as the new assistant principal at the school – coming over after having worked in the same role at the Blackstone Elementary School in Boston’s South End for seven years.

Now, she’s back on this side of the Mystic/Tobin Bridge, and enjoying the idea of working where she lives – ready to welcome students back to school this coming Tuesday, Aug. 29.

“There were some changes coming at the Blackstone and I had worked there for seven years and saw this opportunity to come home to Chelsea,” she said. “It was a fantastic opportunity…There is so much I’ve learned in Boston that is a great compliment to what Chelsea and the Kelly School are doing. There are things I saw at the Kelly I borrowed for the Blackstone and things at the Blackstone that I have brought to the Kelly. I bring a few missing pieces of the puzzle.”

One interesting new experience for Lineweaver, whose husband is former Councillor Brian Hatleberg, is that she has also been a parent at the Kelly. Both of her daughters have attended the Kelly, with Holly moving on to the Browne Middle School this year. However, Hazel is still at the Kelly and going into the third grade.

“She keeps saying how cool it’s going to be to go to school with mom,” she said. “But it also means I bring a parent perspective to the job. We have this long, complicated school supply list. Do we need it to be that complicated? Do parents find it frustrating? It’s not a transformative change, but it can help parents. If someone is having trouble with something at the school, I have that connection. I live here. My kids are here too. We’re going to make this work for you.”

Beyond that, Lineweaver also brings the experience of having served on the Chelsea School Committee for eight years – just a few years ago leaving the seat.

She said that is an experience that helps her see beyond the four walls of the school building, and to bring a birds-eye view of the district and all of its moving pieces to the building.

Lineweaver completed her graduate degree from the Harvard School of Education in 2001 and worked for the Boston Plan for Excellence eight years before taking the job at the Blackstone.

Now, being home feels rather comfortable after so many years working elsewhere, she said.

“It feels like joining a community I have one or two feet in already,” she said.

Classes start for schools throughout the district on Tuesday, Aug. 29.

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Summer Youth Employment Going Full Speed Ahead

Summer Youth Employment Going Full Speed Ahead

Chelsea Collaborative is happy to announce that 160 out of 480 youth that have applied to work during the summer are placed in jobs and working.

Karla Garcia is shown here last week weed whipping an area on Fourth Street under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge by the ‘Welcome to Chelsea’ sign. Garcia is a summer employee of the Chelsea DPW under the Summer Youth Employment Initiative.

Karla Garcia is shown here last week weed whipping an area on Fourth Street under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge by the ‘Welcome to Chelsea’ sign. Garcia is a summer employee of the Chelsea DPW under the Summer Youth Employment Initiative.

However, that currently makes a waiting list of 320.

The Collaborative thanks all of the worksites, and funders for making possible the most recent hired of a total of a 160 youth.

“Most of these youth began their training on June 2, every Friday during the month of June; however everyone else began with orientation and training on July 5 and at their worksites,” said Sylvia Ramirez, director of youth and families department at the Collaborative. “There are 39 site in total for 2017 and work started at those as of July 10. Most of these youth will be ending their work on August 18.”

Furthermore, under the Summer Youth Initiative, there is a series of activities coordinated through the City of Chelsea.

“We encourage our community to take full advantage of all of these great activities and to join us in having a healthy 2017 summer,” said Ramirez.

For additional questions please reach out at 617-889-6080.

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The Finest on the Fourth:Artie Ells Hosts 40th Annual Independence Day Party

The Finest on the Fourth:Artie Ells Hosts 40th Annual Independence Day Party

By Cary Shuman

Party organizer Artie Ells, attired in his traditional red, white and blue costume, speaks to the many guests at the annual July Fourth celebration.

Party organizer Artie Ells, attired in his traditional red, white and blue costume, speaks to the many guests at the annual July Fourth celebration.

When it comes to Fourth of July parties in Chelsea, Artie Ells in a class by himself.

For the past 40 Independence Days, ever since the nation’s bicentennial celebration in 1976, Artie Ells has welcomed hundreds of friends and neighbors to his home on Palmer Street on the holiday.

This year City Manager Tom Ambrosino personally delivered a proclamation to Ells in recognition of his patriotism and lifelong contributions to Chelsea. Ambrosino joins a long list of dignitaries including U.S. Presidents Reagan, Bush (41 and 43), Clinton, and Trump who have honored Ells for his civic and patriotic endeavors with official letters of acknowledgement.

The party is officially known as “Artie’s July 4tH Celebration.” On that day (rain has only forced one postponement until July 5), Artie turns his backyard into a “Party with Artie” extravaganza, with guests young and old enjoying a barbecue of hot dogs, hamburgers, sausages, and steak to go along with musical entertainment, swimming in the Ells pool, and games for the kids.

A large, 24-by-30-foot American flag is on display to complement “God Bless America” signs and red, white, and blue bunting.

Artie, his wife, Tish, and their son, Matt, who is assistant director of athletic operations at Northeastern University, presented blue “Party With Artie” t-shirts to the many guests. Artie, who wears a red, white, and blue costume, personally led the gathering in the singing of “God Bless of America.”

What was the inspiration for launching 40 years of a special observance of America’s birthday?

Ells said he had received an American flag that was flown on July 4, 1976 at the U.S. Capitol Building. That flag has been displayed at the party each year.

“I wanted to hold a celebration to provide a nice day for people and honor our country and salute American patriotism,” said Ells. “I don’t want people to forget the great country we live in and what America stands for. It never hurts to be patriotic and believe in the country that you live in.”

The list of guests has included Major League Baseball players such as Wade Boggs, Danny Darwin, and John Henry Johnson. Former Mass. Governor Edward King attended one of the celebrations. Former state senator Francis Doris was a big supporter.

“It’s just a great event where a bunch of people can get together and have a good time and love each and show their patriotism,” said Frank Mahoney, who has known Ells since his childhood.

Artie grew up on Hancock Street and graduated from Chelsea High in 1963. He later played for the talented and colorful New Bridge Café softball team in the local fast pitch league. Ells joined softball legends Eddie McCarthy, Homer Norton, Danny Cronin, Bobby Gallo, Mike Kearney, Rollie DeSimone and others on the New Bridge team that would pack the old Carter Park on game nights.

He holds a lifelong love for the city and has a respectful knowledge of its history, noting the since demolished Pratt House on Washington Avenue where President George Washington once stayed during a visit.

Whether the “Party With Artie” tradition continues next year is a question being debated in the Ells household. The day takes considerable planning and preparation, not to mention the extensive cleanup afterwards.

But Artie Ells will always have a place of fondness in his heart for his friends, his city, and his country.

“I’ve been blessed with so many great friends and family,” said Artie. “To me, Chelsea is my home and it’s always been my home. And without a doubt we live in the greatest country in the world.”

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Avellaneda Proposes Planning Process to Change Zoning on Marginal Street

By Seth Daniel

In the wake of a Waterfront Planning Process for the areas next to Chelsea Street Bridge, Councillor Roy Avellaneda has called for the strip of land running along Marginal Street from Highland Avenue to Winnisimmet Street to be re-zoned to provide what he believes are better uses.

In an order presented to the Council on Monday and passed, he called for the City Manager and Planning Department to draft a zoning amendment for the City Council to review within 45 days, adding a Waterfront Residential Commercial Overlay District (WRCOD) to the highly-industrial – though partly residential – area. He said he believes the new overlay district would promote economic development, eliminate blighted properties and encourage residential and commercial uses.

Some of the uses suggested to be allowed in the new district include multi-family dwellings with four or more units, dwellings containing six or fewer units, multifamily dwelling units of 12-35 units per acre, hotels, bakeries, convenience stores, supermarkets, restaurants, banks, cinemas and indoor commercial recreation – to name a few.

In addition, he calls for uses currently allowed by right in the industrial area should only be allowed by special permit, and those allowed now by special permit should be prohibited.

“What I’m doing is taking advantage of the face we’re in this process to look at the waterfront planning,” he said. “This part is not in that study. In the conversation I’ve had with residents down there who live along Marginal Street, they’d like to see less industrial uses – which doesn’t fit waterfront zoning. The things they would like to see are not allowed now, things like commercial mixed use, more larger residential or banks. We should take a look at this piece of land to and allow those things to happen…The current study, again, does not include that area. It’s been cut out…It would be great to envision something for that corridor, which is the front door of our city.”

District 6 Councillor Giovanni Recupero agreed that he believes it’s a good idea.

“I am in favor of it,” he said. “It will make our area much better and it isn’t going to make the taxes go up. All of that isn’t allowed there now. We would have retail and stores with apartments above. All of that makes sense down there.”

Meanwhile, there are rumblings that not everyone agrees with the idea, and it is believed that heavy industrial owners like the warehouse on Essex Street, Eastern Salt and Boston Hides & Furs might have concerns.

Some on the Council had initial concerns as well, though public comments were not yet made on the matter. It will be scheduled for a public hearing at the Planning Board, and later at the Council

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Police Briefs 09-15-2016

Monday, 9/5

Elias Dominguez, 31, 3 Franklin Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

Tuesday, 9/6

Heriberto Lebron, 65, 165 Hawthorne St., Chelsea, was arrested for distribution of Class A drug, conspiracy to violate drug law.

Anthony Aloise, 54, 207 Shurtleff St., Chelsea, was arrested for conspiracy to violate drug law, possessing Class drug.

Jorge Cora, 53, 36 Cottage St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended/revoked license.

Kristopher Goodrich, 34, 835A Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested on warrants and for trespassing.

Carlos Zavala, 47, 111 Blossom St., Chelsea, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Christopher Golinski, 34, 63B Floyd St., Everett, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, reckless operation of motor vehicle, marked lanes violation.

Wednesday, 9/7

Ramon Pagan, 55, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston, was arrested for trespassing.

Diontie Rovira, 23, 28 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

John Lewis, 31, 292 Salem St., Revere, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Thursday, 9/8

Frank Gerardi, 44, 161 Bennington St., East Boston, was arrested for shoplifting.

Joshua Conte, 28, 2 Margaret Rd., Stoneham, was arrested on warrants.

Saturday, 9/10

Rigoberto Lovato-Ramirez, 32, 112 Lexington St., East Boston, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Sunday, 9/11

Juan Lopez, 40, Carter St., under the bridge, (homeless), was arrested for drinking/possessing open alcoholic beverage in public.

Sixto Lopez, 29, 17 Whitier St., Lynn, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, reckless operation of motor vehicle, disorderly conduct.

Juvenile Offender, 15, Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery, carrying dangerous weapon, evade taxi fare, armed assault to murder.

Juvenile Offender, Chelsea, was arrested for armed assault to murder, assault and battery, carrying dangerous weapon or k nife over 4×1 inches, evade taxi fare.

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Eastern Salt Gets Lukewarm Reception for Plan to Expand into Eastie

By John Lynds

At a Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) sponsored meeting on Monday night in East Boston, three proposals to develop the former Hess site on Condor Street along the Chelsea Creek were pitched to the East Boston community.

One of those proposals came from Chelsea’s Eastern Salt Company, which said it was looking to expand its operations across the McArdle Bridge to East Boston.

The industrial parcel of land that once housed storage tanks for Hess Oil is zoned as a Designated Port Area (DPA) so a majority of the activity at the site needs to be marine industrial use.

Three developers, City Wide Organics, the East Boston Community Development Corporation (CDC) and the Eastern Salt Company from Chelsea, put together solid maritime focused uses with community benefits, but the crowd seemed to be leaning towards the CDC proposal.

The Eastern Salt proposal, which got a lukewarm reception from residents of Eastie, was to place a ‘buffer’ salt pile, like the company has across the Meridian Street Bridge in Chelsea, on the Hess Site.

The salt would be barged over from Chelsea and distributed around the region during winter storms. While Eastern Salt did have community benefits like a harbor walk and outdoor green space, it was the fact that the property could generate 40 to 50 truck trips per day during the height of winter storm activity that had many really concerned.

Despite Eastern Salt’s best efforts to win the crowd over with community benefits, many residents on Eagle Hill said they did not want to look down on a 50-foot pile of salt all year long.

City Wide Organics submitted a proposal to convert the property into a organic waste recycling plant that will convert waste into renewable energy and fertilizer. They also plan to create public outdoor space around the perimeter of the plant much like the MWRA Deer Island facility in Winthrop.

The CDC proposal was pitched its director, Al Caldarelli. He said his proposal would limit traffic, cause no odor and create jobs in the community. The CDC plans to build three buildings as well as a tot lot park, harbor walk and dog park as community benefits. The three buildings would house three longstanding Eastie businesses. These businesses include John Zirpolo’s Cora Group, an expansion of Dan Noonan’s already successful shipyard and marina on Marginal Street and Peter Merullo’s Semper Diving and Marine. All three businesses have roots in marine industrial use.

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Barnes Hopes to Come Back and Make Chelsea a Better Place

By Seth Daniel

A lot of valedictorians leave their high school experience every spring with grand plans, college scholarships, and not much thought of their home towns.

In fact, more often than not, those big plans are in far away places.

That’s not the case for Chelsea High Valedictorian Katherine Barnes – who won the honor on June 1 in a very close race with Salutatorian William Estrada – who bucks all such trends and has focused her future plans squarely in Chelsea.

“I want to come back to Chelsea,” the Clinton Street resident said. “My mom’s side came here off the boat. We’ve been here forever. It’s home. You can’t just abandon it and leave it behind. If you’re going to complain about something and want to change something, then you should do something. Trying to find a better place to live isn’t going to help anyone. You should want to make it a better place for everyone. For me, I want to make Chelsea a better place for my siblings, other people’s children and my children if I have them. My house is the first house my grandparents owned when they came from Italy. There’s a very strong family connection here for me. I could never leave it all behind.”

And her love of Chelsea comes from having grown up for many years outside of Chelsea.

Having been born here, Barnes’ family moved to Florida for several years. She attended elementary and 7th grade in Florida and then the family moved back just in time for her to attend 8th grade at the Clark Avenue School.

“I really was so happy to be returning here,” she said. “All my family lived here and I did not have the best experience at the schools in Florida. I wasn’t challenged and wasn’t the most popular kid. I went to the Clark and everyone was so nice and friendly. I had never had the experience where people appreciated me for what I knew instead of picking on me for what I knew.”

That year at the Clark, she said, was a complete turnaround for her – as she was chosen Student of the Year for the Clark Ave Middle School.

From there, she said she gained confidence and pivoted into a new direction.

In high school, she became an advocate – much like her mother, Christine Barnes, who is a frequent attendee at civic meetings in Chelsea and is outspoken on many issues.

Barnes said she created what is now known as the Handbook Committee when she championed opposition to the school dress code.

“We wanted to get more student say in the handbook policies,” she said. “It started with the dress code and soon we realized there were a lot of things that need to be changed or updated…That committee will continue into next year and I’m excited about that because there will be more student say and more parent say in the school handbook.”

She was also active as president of the Book Club, a member of InterACT and National Honor Society.

Barnes has a full scholarship to attend Hamilton College in New York as part of the Posse Foundation Program – which provides scholarships and a support/mentoring network for inner city students who want to attend private schools outside of their region.

Barnes said she almost didn’t participate in the exclusive Posse Scholar program because she didn’t want to leave home. However, once visiting the campus, she knew she had to go there.

Still, she said it’s only a prelude to coming back to Chelsea for her larger goals.

“My mom says I will be president and my grandmother says I’ll be the city manager,” she laughed. “I want to come back to help change things in Chelsea. I think there are a lot of different things, but the biggest thing is the education.”

And while away from Chelsea, what will she miss the most besides her family?

The 111 bus.

“The biggest thing I’ll miss when I’m gone is boarding the 111 bus and going into Boston,” she said. “I always say I hate that bus and it can be frustrating at times, but getting on in Bellingham Square and meeting people and seeing friends – there’s just an excitement that builds as you anticipate something big that is coming as you go over the Bridge. You want to hate the 111, but you know it brings you to such good things.”

Barnes celebrated her top honors last Sunday, June 5, at graduation exercises, and said she’s not one for speeches, but was grateful to have been chosen and recognized.

“The goal wasn’t to be valedictorian, but it is nice to be recognized,” she said. “A lot of hard work went into it.”

Barnes is the daughter of John and Christine Barnes. Her siblings are Sarah, Chelsea and Jillian.

Katherine Barnes is the valedictorian of Chelsea High School (CHS) this year, but her big plans don’t include leaving Chelsea behind. After college, she said she intends to come back and help make it a better place.

Katherine Barnes is the valedictorian of Chelsea High School (CHS) this year, but her big plans don’t include leaving Chelsea behind. After college, she said she intends to come back and help make it a better place.

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