Police Briefs 11-16-2017

Police Briefs 11-16-2017

SUSPICIOUS CHARACTER

On Nov. 5, at 3:15 p.m., a CPD officer, while parked across from the Chelsea Police Headquarters, was approached by a young male. The officer reported that the male seemed to be out of breath and in a panic.

He told the officer that he was riding his bicycle on Central Avenue by the cemetery and observed a truck drive past him four times, and each time the operator made comments to him that made him feel uncomfortable. The officer gave a description out to all Chelsea units to BOLO for a black Dodge Ram truck as reported by the young male. A short time later Chelsea officers observed the truck after it hit a vehicle near Chestnut and Fifth streets. Other Chelsea Units responded and stopped vehicle and placed operator under arrest. The vehicle was reported to be stolen out of Reading.

Michael Valentin, 17, of Revere, was charged with unlicensed operation, reckless operation, leaving the scene of property damage, and receiving a stolen vehicle.

STOLE CELL PHONE

On Nov. 5, at noon, a CPD officer on walking patrol in uniform observed from a distance of 100 feet a known female. The officer observed the female approach the victim, who was sitting against a wall by Cherry Street at Everett Avenue. The officer observed the female grab the victim with both hands and start to push him. The officer then observed female take a cell phone from victim. She was placed into custody on scene.

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, of Revere, was charged with unarmed robbery.

UNLICENSED LIVERY DRIVERS

On Nov. 6, at approximately 6 a.m., a traffic officer was monitoring the intersection of Crescent and Eastern avenues. At that location, the officer observed a vehicle take a right hand turn from Crescent Avenue onto Eastern Avenue without stopping. The operator was discovered to be unlicensed and was allegedly employed by Nunez Livery of East Boston.

The Traffic Division has been monitoring the practice of this livery company hiring unlicensed drivers. The operator was placed into custody and the vehicle was impounded.

Osmin Antonio Gomez-Bran, 21, of 743 Broadway, was charged with unlicensed operation and failing to yield at an intersection.

HIGH COURT AFFIRMS CONVICTION 

The state’s highest court this month upheld a Suffolk Superior Court jury’s murder verdict in the 2006 homicide of Yolande Danestoir by her son.

The 33-page unanimous decision affirms the conviction of Norton Cartright for first-degree in his mother’s slaying inside the Reynolds Street home they once shared – where Cartright had continued to live in a crawlspace after being ordered to stay out of the residence. Evidence at trial established that Cartright beat her with a hammer, causing fatal injuries, after she found him inside the apartment.

Cartright’s primary argument on appeal was that his videotaped and audio-recorded admissions to State and Chelsea police detectives were not voluntary, that his prior motion to suppress should have been granted, and that his statement should not have gone before the jury. The high court disagreed.

“We conclude, as did the motion judge, that the defendant’s confession was voluntary, and therefore admissible,” the court wrote, noting that the detectives “pointed accurately at the evidence arrayed against him” and that their suggestion of possible mitigating circumstances “were within the bounds of acceptable interrogation methods.”

Cartright also argued that the detectives’ appeals to let the victim “rest in peace” in the “afterlife” by telling “the truth” were improper. The high court rejected this claim, as well, finding that they were not “calculated to exploit a particular psychological vulnerability of the defendant” and did not render his incriminating statements involuntary.

“Contrary to the defendant’s contention, the religious references here were of a type that other courts have concluded were permissible,” the high court wrote. “Nothing indicates that police took advantage of, or knew of, the defendant’s personal religious beliefs, or of any special susceptibility he might have had to religious appeals.”

Police Log

Monday, 10/30

Juan Valle, 38, 127 Division St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Laura Fontanez, 52, 152 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery.

Wednesday, 11/1

Christopher Rivera, 25, 54 Maverick St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Alisha Cohen, 38, 36 Winthrop Rd., Chelsea, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage and disorderly conduct.

Thursday, 11/2

Alexandra Corn, 60, 49 Bromfield Rd., Somerville, was arrested for larceny over $250.

Friday, 11/3

Carlos Sanchez Renderos, 29, 140 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Kevin Merrill, 37, 240 Albany St., Cambridge, was arrested on a warrant.

Marcio Mezabaca, 32, 220 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, leaving scene of property damage, failure to stop for police, assault to murder and resisting arrest.

Saturday, 11/4

Jose Orozco Dias, 44, 73 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Sunday, 11/5

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, 106 Mountain Ave., Revere, was arrested for unarmed robbery.

Pedro Mejia, 34, 1641 Shore Rd., Revere, Larceny over $250.

Monday, 11/6

Antonio Gomez-Bran, 21, 743 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, failure to yield at intersection.

Jenry Lopez-Alvarez, 29, 106 Webster Ave., Chelsea, waas arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Tuesday, 11/7/17

Pena Aguilar Bonifacio, 48, address unknown, was arrested for trespassing.

Henry Hernandez-Valentin, 47, 21 John St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing.

Wednesday, 11/8

Alexander Hubbard, 45, 14 Savin St., Roxbury, was arrested on warrants.

Friday, 11/10

Allan Tzalam Hernandez, 18, 48 Harvard St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

German Sanchez, 23A Philomena Ave., Revere, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Saturday, 11/11

Robert Daniels, 18, 73A Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

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New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

New Chelsea Day Center Making a Difference in Homeless Community

By Seth Daniel

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

Pastor Ricardo Valle, Ivone Valle, Esperanza Escobar and Ivellise Gonzalez are all volunteers in the new Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) in the basement of the Light of Christ Church on Broadway. The new Center is a partnership between the City, Valle and many others.

In years past, when it was severely cold, those living on the streets of Chelsea had nowhere to go but under blankets.

Some, as recently as last year, died because of exposure to the cold.

Now, to help prevent that and to give those on the streets a place to go during the day, the Chelsea Day Resource Center (SELAH) has opened in the basement of the Light of Christ Church at 738 Broadway.

The Day Center is a partnership between Pastor Ricardo Valle and his church, as well as the City of Chelsea, Pastor Ruben Rodriguez, MGH Chelsea and CAPIC.

It is part of the overall effort to provide a place for those that hang out in Bellingham Square or under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge to go for services – things such as meals, clothing, hot showers, a bathroom and – occasionally – a shoulder to cry on. It’s also a resource that can be activated by the City overnight in times of extreme cold or extreme weather events.

It isn’t a new idea, but rather one Valle and others have been championing privately for a number of years. However, about three years ago, the City began to show a greater interest in partnering with Valle and others during a relentless cold snap. One particularly bad night, they put together a quick plan to partner with Valle and host those from the streets as a trial emergency measure.

It went so well that plans have been ongoing since then to get something official going. Now, that has happened.

Valle said the center has been open since Aug. 28, and so far things are working really well. In fact, SELAH is just about ready to get their full commercial kitchen working so they can provide on-site cooked meals every day, Monday through Friday.

“This is an investment with no monetary returns,” said Valle. “If someone is sick and they die, that’s terrible but we can accept that. If they die because they are out in the cold, we can do better than that. I have this space here and I believe everyone deserves a second chance and maybe this is the place where they can come find a second chance…We talk to them and try to get them to ask for help. Once they ask, we immediately have a team ready to get them the help they need to get out of this lifestyle.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said the population of homeless and vagrants in the city needed a place to go during the day. Many used to hang out in the Square all day, and it wasn’t compatible with the business district and nearby schools. However, there was nowhere else for them to go.

“We were really looking to partner to create a place so there’s a place people can go to get a shower and something to eat,” he said. “We hope it can be a helpful resource for our Navigators. There are now options that they didn’t have before. So far it’s doing pretty well.”

Ambrosino said the City was able to give the Center a grant of about $35,000 to build the showers and bathrooms. Meanwhile, other monies were directed to the operating budget from the Mass General neighborhood monies.

Bobby Soroka lived on the streets and under the Bridge for years until getting his own place recently. He started coming to the Day Center when it opened, and now he returns to help out as a volunteer.

“I liked what I saw when I came here and they needed help,” he said. “I was here anyway. Without this, they wouldn’t be able to shower. It’s a nice place to hand and especially with winter coming. Everybody gets along. There are no fights or problems.”

Valle said having the shower and ability to clean up is very important. He said they often find those coming in very deteriorated conditions. One man had his feet rotted, and couldn’t walk well. In general, he said, it has helped the hygiene of the community of homeless that frequent and live in Chelsea.

“A shower means a lot to them,” he said. “The first time we opened the center, it took 30 minutes and you could feel the smell. Now you come here and you don’t feel that because they have access to a shower five days a week. We had a man who came in to take a shower and he took his shoes off and his feet had deteriorated. He couldn’t walk and was using a stick to get around. It was bad and we see a lot of people in that condition.”

Soroka now has his own housing, but at night in the cold, he said he still is uneasy when he smells the air. It brings back really bad memories, and so he avoids going outside at night. He also said it helps him to continue to relate to what those at the Center are going through.

“It meant a lot to see them open this, especially a few years ago when they opened it during the cold,” he said. “I was under the Bridge then. I’m not one to go to a shelter. I’ll sleep outside first. I have a place, but I don’t like to go outside. That night air scares me to death. It makes me think I could be out there again. I hope not.”

The Day Center is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It is in desperate need of volunteers, Valle said, and he hopes that more Chelsea people will step forward to help.

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Police Briefs 11-09-2017

Police Briefs 11-09-2017

POLICE Briefs By Seth Daniel

TRIED TO KILL POLICE OFFICER WITH CAR

On Nov. 3 at 1:10 p.m., a victim of a Hit and Run flagged down a CPD officer on a detail. The victim reported that he had been struck by the vehicle, which fled the scene located at 280 Second St. The suspect’s vehicle was located and the detail officer attempted to stop the vehicle with verbal commands from the roadway. The officer was forced to jump out of the way to avoid being struck as the operator continued to flee the scene at a high rate of speed. The operator was later stopped by other CPD units and the operator was placed into custody

Marcio Mezabaca, 32, of 220 Broadway, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor, leaving the scene of property damage, failing to stop for police, assault to murder and resisting arrest.

STOLE CELL PHONE

On Nov. 5, at noon, a female known to a CPD officer on patrol was observed in the company of a male in the area of Cherry Street and Everett Avenue. The officer observed from a distance the known female pushing the victim, and then grabbing his cellphone. Once she observed the officer, she fled the area. She was located a short distance away and placed into custody.

Meghan Mastrangelo, 36, of Revere, was charged with unarmed robbery.

ROBBED WITH BALL BAT

On Oct. 26 at 5:59 p.m., an armed robbery was reported at the Corner Market, located at 803 Broadway. The victim clerk stated that an unknown male party wearing a ski mask entered the store, struck him with a wooden bat style object, and then made away with money, an unknown amount of $30 lottery tickets and cigarettes.

The victim was treated on scene by EMS for an abrasion sustained on his left arm. The suspect was described as a black male approximately 45-47 years old, 5’8” tall, wearing a black ski mask, black jacket, blue jeans, black shoes, and gloves.

Please contact CPD Detectives if you have information to report.

PROBLEM OUTSIDE RESTAURANT

On Nov. 1, at 6:19 p.m., a disturbance was reported outside Chung Wah Restaurant, located at 460 Broadway. Officers observed a female who appeared to be intoxicated displaying boisterous behavior and disturbing the flow of pedestrian and traffic. After further investigation, she was placed into custody for being disorderly

Alisha Cohen, 38, of 36 Winthrop Rd., was charged with being disorderly and possession of an alcoholic beverage.

TEMPER, TEMPER

On Oct. 29 at 10:32 a.m., a male subject was placed into custody after he had been observed breaking a window on the old Salvation Army Donation Center, located at 456 Broadway. The officer observed the male subject punch the window as a result of an apparent argument between him and an unknown female party. He was placed into custody for malicious destruction of property.

Andrew Babigumira, 31, homeless, was charged with wanton destruction.

STABBED FOR DEALING DRUGS

On Oct. 29, at 5:05 p.m., officers responded to a reported stabbing at 744 Broadway #2. A victim was located inside the apartment with minor lacerations to the hand. The victim stated that a dispute arose with his roommate over him dealing narcotics out of their apartment.

The suspect was found by CPD offices and placed under arrest.

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Chelsea Chamber Pot of Gold Set for Oct 18

Chelsea Chamber Pot of Gold Set for Oct 18

The 30th Annual Chelsea Chamber of Commerce $10,000 Pot of Gold is around the corner.  The event will be held on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at Anthony’s of Malden, 105 Canal Street, Malden, MA. It will be an outstanding evening filled with great networking opportunities, delicious food and Back to the 80s fun, all while supporting your Chamber.  This is the longest running major fundraiser for the Chelsea Chamber!  Proceeds greatly contribute to the important work the Chelsea Chamber of Commerce does for the business community in Chelsea.  First prize is $10,000.  Only 250 will be sold and can be purchased by Chamber members and nonmembers alike.  Act now and you could be the next $10,000 Pot of Gold winner!

Chairs Sue Gallant and Arthur Arsenault are working with their committee to make the 30th  Pot of Gold the best yet!  The Chamber will be going back to the 80s when it all started celebrating all the iconic music, fads and outfits from that decade.  Prizes will be awarded to the best outfits from the 80s! Get creative and let’s see what you can put together!  Maybe you will be one of our prize winners!

We also have opportunities to purchase raffle tickets to win Megaraffle baskets that are each valued at over $500.  Themed baskets include Nights on the Town with Celtics, Bruins or Red Sox tickets, Ultimate Tailgate Package and a North Shore experience to name a few.  We will also raffle off an Instant Wine Cellar where one person will win enough wine to start their own wine Cellar as well as a 50/50 raffle!  So many great prizes to win besides the big prize of $10,000!

 Tickets are $175.00 each.  The ticket price includes one entry in the drawing for a chance to win the $10,000 top prize, opportunities to win one of our many fabulous door prizes, one dinner which will include a delicious meal of surf and turf and open bar. Additional dinner tickets can be purchased for $60.  Festivities start at 6:00pm with dinner at 7:00pm and the first ticket drawn at 8pm.

The Chamber would like to thank the following for sponsoring this important fundraiser for the Chelsea Chamber of Commerce:

Corporate Sponsors

Broadway Jewelers

Chelsea Bank, a division of East Cambridge Savings Bank

Golden Cannoli

MGH Health Center

Member Sponsors

Arsenault & Cline, CPAs, Stop & Compare Supermarkets, Cameron Real Estate Group, Hispanic American Institute, North Shore Advisory Group

In-Kind Sponsors

Coprico Printing, Cataldo Ambulance, Chelsea Community Cable Television, Fairmont Copley Plaza, El Planeta, Independent Newspaper Group

Sponsorships are still available. Your name will be included on the Chamber website, in social and print media and advertised throughout the event. What a great way to highlight your business to people from all over the North Shore!

Only 250 tickets will be sold, so get your tickets now! Check out the Chamber website at www.chelseachamber.org, call the office at 617-884-4877 or drop by 308 Broadway Chelsea today.  Rich Cuthie, Executive Director of the Chamber, will be happy to help you pick that winning ticket number!

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Dog Owners to Rally Saturday in Kickoff for First Chelsea Off-Leash Park

Dog Owners to Rally Saturday in Kickoff for First Chelsea Off-Leash Park

By Seth Daniel

This little corner of Broadway and Commandants Way has been selected for the City’s first off-leash dog park for small to medium sized dogs.

This little corner of Broadway and Commandants Way has been selected for the City’s first off-leash dog park for small to medium sized dogs.

Get your paws to City Hall on Saturday, as dog owners across the City are invited to rally and parade down to Lower Broadway where the City is planning its first off-leash dog park.

The Paw-Raid event will start at City Hall Saturday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. From there, dogs and their owners will stroll down Broadway to the site of the proposed new park under the Mystic/Tobin Bridge.

The new dog park will be at the corner of Broadway and Commandants Way across from the Chelsea Yacht Club on a small, 2,000 sq. ft. corner of the newly-constructed Mystic Overlook Park – soon to be Chelsea’s first under-the-bridge open space.

“It’s a smaller park so it’s designed for smaller dogs,” said Planner Alex Train. “While we do have larger parks beside it, all of our parks in Chelsea mandate dogs be on a leash. This will be the first off-leash park in the City and will have about 2,000 sq. ft. for dogs to run around.”

The small park will be separated into two areas with a retaining wall and will have benches and a doggie water fountain. It will also include landscaping and other improvements.

The park is actually a gift to the City in many ways, with the Stanton Foundation of Cambridge footing – or “pawing” – 90 percent of the costs. The City only has to pay about 10 percent of the costs of the Park, which are being done in conjunction with the larger Mystic Overlook open space next door.

Train said the plan is to put the project to bid at the end of September and begin work in the fall. The hope is to have completion of it by late spring 2018.

The event on Saturday is designed by the City and the Chelsea Prospers movement to get a critical mass of dog owners who could serve as a “Friends” group to the park.

“It’s a celebratory event to make people fully aware of the construction schedule and get a gathering of dog owners to walk together down Broadway,” he said. “There will be a lot of ongoing maintenance that the City is hoping to share with any Friends of the Dog Park group that could form. We hope that we could collaborate with a Friends group to maintain and improve the dog park. We’re really trying to foster that congregation of dog owners with Saturday’s event.”

Train said that City leaders – and even planners like himself – have seen the need for more dog facilities.

“I’ve worked here for two years and the numbers of people I see with dogs is steadily increasing,” he said. “This is definitely needed.”

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City Manager,Police Take Two-Way Broadway to Business Community

City Manager,Police Take Two-Way Broadway to Business Community

By Seth Daniel

City Manager Tom Ambrosino and consultants for the City took their message of a two-way Broadway in the business district to owners of the businesses on Thursday morning, Aug. 31, with Ambrosino saying he would stake his position on the issue.

Members of City government met with business owner from Broadway and the adjacent downtown streets Thursday morning at the Green Street Apartments community room. Kicking off the morning, Ambrosino expressed his great support for the change.

“It is incumbent on me to try to reduce the level of skepticism and outright opposition to this change,” he said emphatically. “That is what I’ll try to do in the coming months…I am 100 percent confident I can do that by doing two things – telling you about the advantages and listening to you…Whatever you think of two-way Broadway – one-way Broadway, that one-way speedway, cannot continue. It is unsafe. It is confusing to pedestrians and motorists and it is counterproductive to businesses and merchants on the corridor.”

Ambrosino stressed he believes that one change can transform the City’s downtown – particularly in terms of easing traffic patterns, eliminating unsafe double parking situations and making it easier for pedestrians to get to businesses.

Ralph DiNisco of the consulting firm Nelson Nygaard said that two-way Broadway is possible from a traffic management standpoint.

He compared it to other communities like Revere and Somerville where the lanes are just as wide and the traffic volumes are far greater.

Having studied the volumes in Chelsea and other communities, Broadway Chelsea handles only about 6,500 cars per day, where other Broadways along the Route 107 corridor handle double that.

“From a traffic operations perspective, two-way Broadway can work,” he said. “The numbers aren’t so high that it’s impossible. It can easily work with some changes. From a big picture, there’s no fatal flaw…If you look at other places, they have converted to two-way, and they are successful…Broadway now is a speedway. Nobody stops going down Broadway. They go faster than you want a car to go in a very busy downtown business corridor with people walking around.”

Police Chief Brian Kyes also spoke highly of the change, saying it would help dangerous situations for pedestrians and prevent double parking of delivery trucks – which allows criminals to shield themselves from police.

“There are a lot of young mothers pushing a carriage and when they come out with a carriage from behind a truck, it’s a very, very dangerous situation,” he said. “I’ve heard the idea for many, many years and we at the police department think it’s a very good idea.”

But business owners weren’t so convinced.

Some, like Roman Gold of Margolis Pharmacy, felt that it could increase traffic and become a cut-through for people trying to avoid Rt. 1 traffic.

“You could start to see a lot more traffic redirected by things like the Waze app from Route 1 to avoid traffic tie-ups further up the road,”  he said.

Rick Gordon of Allen’s Cut-Rite said one of the biggest problems for merchants would be deliveries. Many merchants, he said, cannot afford to pay to have deliveries outside of busy times, and he said there isn’t adequate space for delivery trucks in the alley.

“Many people would have to pay $100 or $150 fees for scheduling deliveries,” he said. “I can’t really pass that fee on to my customers and it’s an undue burden on the small business. Many of us do UPS and FedEx only, but some get trailer trucks in periodically…What needs to be done is you need to start by re-striping the parking spots and doing the small things.”

Compare Supermarket owner Al Calvo said he thinks that the delivery problem – which was a great concern – could be solved.

“We’re emphatic with our vendors that there be no deliveries after noon,” he said. “I think there’s a way for us as business people to set the rules. Sometimes my deliveries show up after 2 p.m. and we don’t accept the load. We do have leverage.”

Some were also worried about whether or not the City could enforce the rules well enough, that there would be enough oversight.

Ambrosino said he guaranteed that, if approved, he would make it work.

“We have enough manpower and enough officers that want to work overtime if that’s what it takes,” he said. “I will put my reputation on the line. The City Council can fire me if it doesn’t work. I think it can be that transformative.”

The change cannot be unilaterally implemented. If it is recommended in the overall Re-Imagining Broadway study, it has to be submitted to the Traffic Commission. If approved there, it must go to the City Council for a final approval. At each step, there is plenty of room for public comment.

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City Takes Two-Way Broadway Idea to Businesses Today, Aug 31

City Takes Two-Way Broadway Idea to Businesses Today, Aug 31

By Seth Daniel

City officials and consultants for the Re-Imagining Broadway effort will take one of their most controversial suggestions to the business community on Broadway today, Aug. 31, prompting a discussion about making Broadway a two-way street.

The six-month planning effort has come up with numerous suggestions about how to improve the corridor, but at the top of those suggestions is the idea about taking Broadway from a one-way to a two-way.

The street has been in its current configuration for more than a generation, and few remember the last time it was moving differently.

However, count City Manager Tom Ambrosino as a convert to the idea.

“I think it will be transformative and make a large difference for the downtown’s flavor,” he said. “I think we can do it. Put me down as a huge proponent. It could dramatically improve the safety of the corridor by slowing down traffic considerably. I think it would look a lot prettier. The drawings have a very interesting iteration of a two-way Broadway.”

Ambrosino said this month that after the meeting with the downtown stakeholders, including the businesses, they would come up with a decision on the matter.

All downtown business owners and employees are invited to attend the meeting, which takes place at 9 a.m. at the Greenhouse Apartments Community Room, 154 Pearl St.

A Spanish language interpreter will be available.

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Police Briefs 08-31-2017

Police Briefs 08-31-2017

HAZ-MAT DRUG SITUATION ON WEBSTER

Chelsea Police and State Police assigned to the Suffolk DA’s office responded Wednesday afternoon to an unattended death on Webster Avenue, where an adult male was found deceased in a vehicle outside his home.

Based on the presence of an unknown white powder on the deceased’s body, a Fire Department hazardous materials team responded and took a sample that is currently being transported to a state lab for testing.

It was the first time that the Police Department has used new protocols from Chief Brian Kyes to handle Fentanyl situations. That came after two officers were sent to the hospital with complications after being exposed to Fentanyl during an incident this month.

SLASHED IN THE FACE

On Aug. 17, at 1:03 a.m., Officers were flagged down by a witness in the area near Bellingham Square. The witness stated that a male was stabbed near 196 Shurtleff St. Officers responded and spoke to th victim who stated that he was “hanging out” with a female when a male party approached and pulled out a butterfly style knife and subsequently slashed the victim across the face.

The victim was transported to MGH Boston for a laceration to his face.

During the investigation it was revealed that all parties knew each other and a suspect was placed into custody.

Rigoberto Ramirez, 39, of 23 Eleanor St., was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, mayhem, and carrying a dangerous weapon (second offense).

ASSAULTED ELDERLY MAN

On Aug. 25, at 3:59 p.m., officers responded to a fight in progress at Broadway and Second St. Upon arrival, the suspect was observed fleeing the scene. After a brief foot pursuit, the suspect was placed into custody for assault on a person over 60. The victim was treated for injuries at CHA Everett.

Kirk Crowley, 49, of 855 Broadway, was charged with assault and battery on a person 60 or over.

BREAKING AND ENTERING

On Aug. 19, at 6:14 a.m., a break into a motor vehicle was reported at 113 Cook Ave. The victim provided the suspects’ descriptions to officers. While canvasing the area, officers encountered a suspect who took off on foot in opposite directions. After a foot pursuit, the subject was placed into custody. Three credit cards, and iPhone 6S, $70 USC, and a pocket knife were located on his person.

A 15-year-old juvenile from Everett was charged with breaking and entering in the day for a felony, receiving a stolen credit card, and carrying a dangerous weapon.

HIT IN HEAD WITH BOTTLE

One Aug. 26, at 2:50 a.m., police responded to an Assault at the Wyndham Hotel, located at 201 Maple St. Victim was located outside the hotel. He had sustained a severe laceration to the back of his head. The victim stated that he was assaulted by several male parties outside of room #501, one of which struck him in the back of the head with a bottle. The victim subsequently was transported to MGH Boston for treatment. After further investigation, three suspects were placed into custody.

Daniel Prito, 27, of 201 Everett Ave.,; Adalberto Pineda, 24, of Malden; and Eric Romero, 24, of Malden; were all charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

ROBBED AT KNIFEPOINT

On Aug. 18, at 2:39 a.m., a victim flagged down Officers in the area near Fourth Street and Pearl Street. The victim stated that he was robbed at knife point by two male and two female parties. The suspects attempted to steal his money, but were only able to get his car keys before fleeing the scene.

The victim suffered a minor laceration to a finger, which he was treated on scene by EMS. After further investigation, three individuals were placed into custody. A warrant has been obtained for the fourth person involved.

Stephen Panzino, 39, of Everett; Johnna Grimaldi, 34, of Everett; and Michael Alden, 43, of Reading; were all charged with armed robbery and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Police Log

Monday, 8/14/17

Alexandria Andrades, 26, 16 Bryant St. Everett, was arrested for assault and battery on a police officer, reckless operation of motor vehicle, failure to stop for police, speeding and stop sign violation.

Tia Tavares, 25, 70 Shawmut St., Chelsea, was arrested on warrants.

Tuesday, 8/15/17

Josue Estrada, 33, 55 Heard St., Chelsea, was arrested for larceny from building.

Wednesday, 8/16/17

Matthew White, 25, 366 Vane St., Revere, was arrested on unarmed robbery.

Thursday, 8/17/17

Rigoberto Ramirez, 39, 23 Eleanor St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, mayhem and dangerous carrying a dangerous weapon,(2nd offense).

Egno Wilva, 26, 22 H igh St., Everett, was arrested for breaking and entering daytime, resisting arrest and assault and battery on a police officer, and warrants.

Friday, 8/18/17

Stephen Panzino, 39, 295 Chelsea St., Everett, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and armed robbery.

Johnna Grimaldi, 34, 161 Union St., Everett, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and armed robbery.

Michael Alden, 43, 122 Village St., Reading, was arrested for armed robbery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and warrant.

Saturday, 8/19/17

Juvenile Offender, 15, Breaking and entering daytime, receiving stolen credit card, carrying dangerous weapon.

Robert Messina, 46, 150 Staniford St., Boston, was arrested on a warrant.

Luz Rodriguez, 55, 835 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for harassment prevention violation and threat to commit crime.

Scott Gaskill, 34, 12 Greenwood Pl., Lynn, was arrested for shoplifting.

Sunday, 8/20/17

Jose Rivera, 49, 143 Main St., Woburn, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage in public.

Tuesday, 8/22/17

Ramon Pagan, 56, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage in public.

Wednesday, 8/23/17

Kristopher Valdes, 40, 50 Parker St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

David Deus, 30, 98 Spring St., Medford, was arrested on a warrant.

Thursday, 8/24/17

Walter Saravia-Calix, 22, 57 Burma Rd., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Ramon Pagagn, 56, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage in public.

Friday, 8/25/17

Joseph Sarro, 54, 17 Court St., Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage in public.

Kirk Crowley, 49, 855 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery on a +60/siabled person.

Saturday, 8/26/17

Daniel Prito, 27, 201 Everett Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Adalberto Pineda, 24, 46 Roberts St., Malden, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Eric Romero, 24, 46 Robert St., Malden, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Sunday, 8/27/19

Cristian Polanco, 22, 30 Cary Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

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Police Briefs 08-17-2017

Police Briefs 08-17-2017

Police Log

Monday, 8/7

Kimberly Moysey, 26, 280 Harvard St., Cambridge, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, reckless operation of vehicle and marked lanes violation.

Johnna Grimaldi, 34, 8 Richard St., Saugus, was arrested on a warrant.

Jose Renu, 57, Everett, was arrested for possessing, alcoholic beverage, furnishing false name, multiple warrants.

Tuesday, 8/8

Bladimir Aracia-Lopez, 33, 107 Chester Ave., Chelseas, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor and warrant.

Amy Pinabella, 44, 767 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested on warrants.

Leonardo Chavez, 58, 56 Chester Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing.

Wednesday, 8/9

Reynaldo Deras, 26, 34 Gardner St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Patrick Lynch, 37, 148 Sycamore ST., Fairhaven, MA was arrested on warrants.

Yalil Figueroa, 60, 1050 Clark St., Revere, was arrested for posasessing alcoholic beverage.

Thursday, 8/10

Kelvin Veras, 27, 92 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and possessing Class B drug.

London Cohen, 31, 36 Winthrop Rd., Chelsea, was arrested for carrying firearm without license, possessing to distribute Class A drug, possessing to distribute Class B drug (3 counts), possessing to distribute Class C drug, ammunition without FID card (2 counts), firearm or feeding device possessing large capacity, receiving stolen property over $250, operating motor vehicle with suspended/revoked license.

Vincent Hernandez, 31, 74 Park St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended/revoked license.

Rigoberto Ramirez, 39, 23 Eleanor St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing.

Courtney Coleman, 36, 445 Sixth St., Boston, was arrested for trespassing and warrant.

Stacy Gordon, 37, 24 Wamesit Ave., Saugus, was arrested for trespassing.

Ronaldo Gonzalez, 29, 126 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Friday, 8/11

Thomas Johnson, 44, 64 Cliff Ave., Winthrop, was arrested for operating under the influence and violation of Learner’s Permit.

Saturday, 8/12

Javier Colon, 49, 249 Princeton St., East Boston was arrested on a warrant.

Sunday, 8/13

Irving Lopez Martinez, 27, 60 Blossom St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

POLICE Briefs By Seth Daniel

ATTACKED FOR NO REASON

On Tuesday, August 1, officers were flagged down by a taxi driver stating he observed two male parties fighting in the area of Shawmut and Maverick Street. Officers immediately responded to the area of Shawmut Street at Maverick and observed a male on the ground, and the other flee on foot from the scene. Officers were able to catch the suspect a short distance later.

The victim stated he was attacked with a metal object by the male suspect he did not know for no reason. The victim was transported to the hospital for treatment to a laceration to his head.

Mauricio Granados, 35, of East Boston, was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

LIGHTS ON, MOTOR RUNNING

On Sunday, August 6, at approximately 1:37 a.m., while on routine patrol in the area of 62 Burma Rd., a CPD officer observed a parked motor vehicle with the engine and lights on.

The officer observed a male party in the driver’s seat, appearing to be asleep.

The officer shined the cruiser’s spotlight in the operator’s direction and he did not move. The officer conducted a field sobriety test, and based on that failure, the subject was placed under arrest for OUI alcohol.

Gerardo Mejia, 38, of Everett, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor.

TRIED TO STEAL A PHONE

On Sunday, August 6, at approximately 6:10 p.m., a CPD officer was assigned on foot in Bellingham Square. He and other officers could hear a woman, later identified as the victim, shouting “that’s my phone,” in the vicinity of 456 Broadway.

As officers approached the disturbance, officers observed the victim and a second female pulling each other by the hair. The officers determined the subject did steal the victim’s phone and while being placed into custody, she also assaulted the officers.

Nicole Pizzi, 36, of East Boston, was charged with assault and battery, resisting arrest, disorderly conduct and assault and battery on a police officer.

SLOWLY I TURN…

On Monday, August 7, at approximately 2:35 a.m. in the area of Broadway and Gerrish Avenue, a CPD officer observed a gray Toyota driving down Broadway towards City Hall Avenue.

The vehicle was going very slow and traveling erratically. The vehicle was observed stopping and moving several times in a short distance. The operator was believed to be operating under the influence of alcohol and placed under arrest.

Kimberly Moysey, 26, of Cambridge, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor, reckless operation, and marked lanes violation.

MOTORCYCLE PROBLEMS

On Friday, August 11, at approximately 8:10 p.m., CPD officers responded to the area of 158 Broadway, Curley’s Restaurant, for a report of an intoxicated male party attempting to leave on his motorcycle.

As the officers arrived, they observed a male on a motorcycle attempting to leave. Based on witnesses statements and the officers observations the officers placed male under arrest.

Thomas Johnson, 44, of Winthrop, was charged with operating under the influence of liquor and violating his learner’s permit.

NEIGHBORS SCRAP

On Sunday, August 13, at approximately 9 p.m., Officers responded to a past assault at 54 Blossom St. Upon arrival, officers spoke to witnesses who stated two neighbors were involved in a fight outside in the street. Both parties were identified and one was placed under arrest for assault.

The second male will be summoned into court for assault.

Irving Lopez Martinez, 27, of 60 Blossom St., was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

CHELSEA GANG MEMBER SENTENCED

A Chelsea man was sentenced Aug 4 in federal court in Boston for distributing crack cocaine.

Jose Muniz, 28, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Senior Judge Mark L. Wolf to five years in prison and four years of supervised release. In April 2017, Muniz pleaded guilty to two counts of possession with intent to distribute cocaine base and distribution of cocaine base and one count of possession with intent to distribute cocaine base and cocaine.

In 2015 and 2016, a federal investigation identified a network of street gangs, which had created alliances to traffic weapons and drugs throughout Massachusetts and generate violence against rival gang members. Based on the investigation, 53 defendants were indicted in  June 2016 on federal firearms and drug charges, including defendants who are allegedly leaders, members, and associates of the 18th Street Gang, the East Side Money Gang and the Boylston Street Gang. These gangs operated primarily in the East Boston, Boston, Chelsea, Brockton, Malden, Revere and Everett areas. During the course of the investigation, over 70 firearms, cocaine, cocaine base (crack), heroin and fentanyl were seized.

During the investigation, Muniz sold cocaine base to a cooperating witness in Chelsea on two separate occasions in July and August of 2015. On Feb. 18, 2016, Muniz was stopped by law enforcement officers in Chelsea, who subsequently seized cocaine base, cocaine, other drugs, and a 9mm handgun from Muniz.

Muniz is one of 13 defendants to plead guilty.

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BIDMC Opens New Urgent Care Center in Chelsea

BIDMC Opens New Urgent Care Center in Chelsea

By Seth Daniel

Barbara Masser, MD, Medical Director of Chelsea Urgent Care, and Jose Abrego, MD.

Barbara Masser, MD, Medical Director of Chelsea Urgent Care, and Jose Abrego, MD.

Responding to community input, the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has opened up a new urgent care facility in Chelsea, a facility that includes hours on the weekends.

The new medical offering opened on Monday, Aug. 7.

Chelsea Urgent Care is open eight hours a day, seven days a week: Monday through Friday from noon to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The addition of an urgent care practice complements the existing outpatient services available at BIDHC-Chelsea, which is located at 1000 Broadway.

Unlike most other urgent care facilities, board-certified emergency medicine physicians staff Chelsea Urgent Care.

“With access to board-certified emergency medicine physicians, Chelsea Urgent Care is essentially an extension of the emergency department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,” said Richard Wolfe, MD, Chief of Emergency Medicine at BIDMC. “Patients can expect the same top-tier care they would receive at our emergency department in Boston but now in a convenient, neighborhood location.”

Several in the community have called for more access to an urgent care facility open on weekends, none louder that Councilor Giovanni Recupero. The councilor called last year for the Mass General in Chelsea to keep later hours on the weekends, but to no avail.

He said he was really glad to see that Beth Israel had heard his message for more access and those of residents as well.

Access to Chelsea Urgent Care is available to patients over the age of 2 experiencing non-life threating injuries or illnesses, such as accidents or falls, sprains, broken bones, infections and high fever. More serious medical needs – such as those resulting from chest pain, heart attack or a trauma – will require an emergency department visit.

Dr. Barbara Masser, medical director of the Chelsea Urgent Care, said they are excited to be able to offer the new service in Chelsea and have gotten great feedback so far.

She said anyone can access services by walking in, but those who use Beth Israel will have a fully integrated compliment to the regular services that have been available for many years.

“We’re really excited because Chelsea is a really great community and we want to give them another option,” she said. “We’ve had a lot of great feedback from the community so far.”

The new Urgent Care will be located on the second floor of the existing center on Broadway.

“We strive to deliver the right care by the right provider at the right place and cost,” said Jayne Carvelli Sheehan, MSN, RN, Senior Vice President of System Integration and Care Coordination at BIDMC. “Chelsea Urgent Care allows us to treat patients with non-life threatening injuries or conditions in the appropriate setting. Local immediate care by our emergency medicine physicians can help avoid unnecessary trips to the emergency department and ultimately save patients time and money.”

To reduce time spent in the waiting room, urgent care appointments can be made online through the  HYPERLINK “https://www.clockwisemd.com/hospitals/1934/appointments/new” Clockwise program. Through this easy-to-use program, patients receive timely text message updates on their appointment time. Free parking is available, and the center is located close to public transportation.

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