Guaranteed to Make You Smile: Drs. Mobed and Parsi Find Great Success

Guaranteed to Make You Smile: Drs. Mobed and Parsi Find Great Success

Dr. Fardad Mobed and Dr. Lily Parsi certainly have a lot in common.

Both are scholars, which goes without saying. They hold degrees in engineering: Dr. Mobed, a Bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering, Dr. Parsi, three advanced degrees in Civil, Water Resources, and Computer System Engineering.

Both attended dental school in the Boston area. Dr. Mobed completed his dental training at Boston University while Dr. Parsi studied at the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine.

But perhaps, most significantly, they share the same home address. Dr. Mobed and Dr. Parsi are husband and wife, the parents of two children.

And they have been practicing dentistry together at their state-of-the-art offices, Northgate Dental, located at 603 Broadway that has been in existence for 27 years. Dr. Mobed is an endodontist specializing in root canal surgery. Dr. Parsi is a pedodontist specializing in children’s dentistry.

Dr. Mobed began his practice in 1992 at the Northgate Shopping Center before moving to Broadway. Dr. Parsi joined the practice in 2008. They also have a dental practice in Brookline.

Yes, they do work side by side in the Revere office, though as Dr. Parsi states, “I treat the children. He treats mostly adults.”

Of course, everyone asks the question, “What’s it like for a couple to work together?”

“It’s great – we really support each other quite a bit,” said Dr. Parsi. “I feel it’s good to know that you can trust the other person 100 percent.”

Dr. Samantha Bogle is the orthodontist at Northgate. Dr. Joey Chang is the oral surgeon and the director of the pre-doctoral program at Tufts School of Dental Medicine.

Do Dr. Mobed and Dr. Parsi talk about dentistry at home during dinner?

“Unfortunately, a lot,” Dr. Parsi said, smiling.

“We go to dental conferences together but we attend different lectures,” added Dr. Mobed.

The dentists have stayed on top of the major technological advances in their profession and their offices feature the latest state-of-the-art equipment.

“I think one of the biggest changes have been in CT scans and microscopes, and everybody gets white fillings instead of silver fillings,” said Dr. Mobed.

Dr. Parsi said preventive care should begin early. “The primary goal in pediatric dentistry is to prevent cavities, so we want to see children as early as 6 months old, but no later than the first year of age,” said Dr. Parsi. “Because the objective is to teach the parents how to take care of their children, ideally so the children will never have cavities, rather than seeing them at the time when there are already cavities in the mouth.”

Dr. Parsi said Northgate wants to be “a dental home for families, so patients know where to go when there are issues, but hopefully we can prevent these issues from happening.”

27 years in Revere

Dr. Mobed has been a practicing dentist in Revere for 27 years. He has treated two generations of families who have been coming to Northgate Dental.

“I like the people,” said Dr. Mobed. “It’s a good community and they’re appreciative of what you do for them.”

“I’ve had patients who I saw when they were very little, and now they now see him,” said Dr. Parsi. “Depending on the patient’s personality, anywhere between the ages 15-18, they’re ready to see the adult dentist.”

She is proud to see her patients dedicating themselves to dental care and prevention.

“I’m especially happy to see the children whom I’ve seen six months old, because they end up being very healthy, and it makes me sad when somebody whom I’ve never seen, comes in to the office and they have major needs. I’m glad we’ve made such a strong connection to families that we’ve known for a long time. It’s very satisfying.”

Dr. Parsi recommends that her patients have regular dental check-ups every six months.

Interestingly Dr. Mobed came to the United States from Iran 40 years ago with the goal of becoming a professional soccer player.

He accomplished that goal, earning a spot on the Boston Teamen professional team that was based in Framingham.

One of his fondest soccer memories was playing for an Iranian team that had an exhibition game in that country against Brazil and Pele, arguably the greatest soccer player in history.

“In 1978, Brazil came to Iran for some exhibition games when Pele was at the top of his game and was most famous at that time,” recalled Dr. Mobed. “I was fast, but too skinny, otherwise I wouldn’t be a dentist now.” But fortunately for their many patients, Dr. Fardad Mobed and Dr. Lily Parsi are dentists now and they look forward to continuing their successful partnership at Northgate Dental for many years to come.

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2019 Black History Month

2019 Black History Month

ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

February 1st Friday 6pm. Kick Off for Chelsea Black History Month Activities

Gallary 456 – Store Front Exhibit of Black Historical Figures of Chelsea

456 Broadway, Chelsea, MA

Continuation of Exhibit at Chelsea Public Library: Black Migration, WWI,

Chelsea Fire. 569 Broadway, Chelsea, MA

February 5th Tuesday 5 – 7pm. City Hall Art Reception. Art, Poetry, African and African

American Artifacts. Chelsea City Hall, 500 Broadway, Chelsea, MA

February 7th Thursday 12pm and 6pm. Bunker Hill Community College, “Tuskeegee

Airmen”Documentary and Discussion. 70 Everett Avenue, Chelsea

February 19th Monday 5pm. Iglesia la Luz de Cristo. The Councilors Cook Off

Community Dinner. 738 Broadway, Chelsea, MA

February 21st Thursday 12pm. Senior Center – Maya Angelou – Poet and Civil Rights

Hidden Figure. Celebration of Phenominal Women

10 Riley Way, Chelsea, MA

February 22nd Friday 6 – 8pm. Evening of Performing Arts, Clark Avenue School

8 Clark Avenue, Chelsea, MA

February 23rd Saturday 11 – 12:30pm. STEM, Chelsea Public Library

569 Broadway, Chelsea, MA (parent and child participation)

February 26th Tuesday 6 – 8pm. New England Gospel Ensemble

Bunker Hill Community College, Charlestown Campus A300 Auditorium

February 28th Wednesday 5 – 8pm. Black History Month Celebration

Keynote Speaker – Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins

Special Recognition Honoring – “Chelsea Trailblazers

Williams Middle School. 180 Walnut Street, Chelsea, MA

ALL EVENTS PLANNED IN COLLABORATION WITH CHELSEA BLACK COMMUNITY, BLACK HISTORY MONTH PLANNING COMMITTEE, LEWIS H. LATIMER SOCIETY, BUNKER HILL COMMUNITY COLLEGE, CHELSEA SENIOR CENTER, CHELSEA PUBLIC SCHOOLS, CITY OF CHELSEA.

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Chelsea Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Mass Cultural Council, a state agency.

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City Looks to Residents to Name, Define Neighborhoods

City Looks to Residents to Name, Define Neighborhoods

Ask 100 people where the Mill Hill neighborhood separates from the Mill Creek neighborhood and one would probably get 100 different answers.

Neighborhoods in Chelsea have been loosely defined for decades, with some not even named at all, but now Downtown Coordinator Mimi Graney is looking to residents of Chelsea to define the City’s neighborhoods more precisely.

“It came up because City Planner Karl Allen has been working on a project by the Produce Center and he kept calling it West Chelsea,” she said. “Every time he did that, people would laugh at it. It brought up the question as to what do you call that area. It was the same thing for the Walnut Street Synagogue area. Then you have people talking about Prattville. We decided to try to figure out what you call the various neighborhoods of Chelsea.”

That started with a query of the Chel-Yea group last month, and during that event and with online follow ups, Graney said she got very impassioned responses.

People, she said, took it very seriously.

“Several people said everything was just Chelsea, but others had strong opinions about Admiral’s Hill and Prattville,” she said. “It has solicited a lot of interested conversations.”

Graney has produced a map with suggested boundaries and names. So far, they have included Prattville, Mayor’s Row, Chelsea High, Addison-Orange, Soldiers’ Home/Powderhorn Hill, Cary Square, Mill Creek, Mill Hill, Spencer Avenue, Eastern Ave Industrial Area, Box District, Bellingham Hill, Salt Piles, Waterfront, Downtown (including Chelsea Square and Bellingham Square), Williams School, Carter Park, Mystic Mall, Produce District and Admiral’s Hill.

It was difficult, she said, to find the real boundaries of the Soldiers’ Home neighborhood versus Cary Square, she said, and many said the Spencer Avenue area should be called Upper Broadway. Mill Creek, on the other hand, has been confused in some ways with the Parkway Plaza.

She said the exercise is one that moves beyond the fun of talking about it, and moving towards making it a place.

“The legacy of the fire in the Mystic Mall area sort of upended most boundaries there,” she said. “People are uncomfortable with the area beyond Carter Park and Chelsea High area. If it doesn’t have a name, it becomes this no man’s land. Naming a place has a power to it. I’m hoping people in these areas claim that power in that naming.”

Graney said they will continue to take input on the neighborhood boundaries, and will likely present something to the community in the near future.

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Police Briefs 01-10-2019

Police Briefs 01-10-2019

STOLEN CAR

On Dec. 11 at 6 p.m., a CPD Detective observed a blue Subaru Impreza make an unsafe lane change coming from Broadway onto City Hall Avenue. The vehicle was a reported stolen motor vehicle out of Revere. The detective continued to follow the car down Chestnut Street. With the assistance from other marked CPD units a car stop was initiated and the operator placed under arrest for being in possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

Katherine Guzman, 36, of 18 Watts St., was charged with being in possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

PULLED KNIFE ON HOTEL EMPLOYEES

On Dec. 21, at 7:11 a.m., units were dispatched to the Hilton Homeward Suites for an individual threatening the employees with a knife.

A description was given out of the suspect as being a short male wearing a black jacket and a scally cap. Officers knew about a previous issue from the day before at the hotel with the same described male. The officers observed the suspect walking on Everett Avenue and placed him under arrest for two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

Alberto Garcia, 51, of 303 Carter St., was charged with two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

CROSSWALK VIOLATION, KNIVES

On Dec. 19, at 6:23 p.m., officers observed a motor vehicle that failed to stop for a pedestrian in the crosswalk in front of 589 Broadway.

The car was then pulled over.

It was determined that the operator of the vehicle was not legally able to operate the car and he was placed under arrest. A search of the person and vehicle also recovered knives.

Manuel Alvarez Mejia, 29, of 759 Broadway, was charged with crosswalk violation, operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license, and two counts of carrying a dangerous weapon.

ALMOST HIT A CRUISER, FLED

On Dec. 23, at 7:25 p.m., a CPD officer stated his cruiser was almost hit by a black motor vehicle in Fay Square. He reported the vehicle fled onto Heard Street when the officer activated his blue lights. Other Chelsea Units were able to stop the car. The driver had no license to operate a motor vehicle and was placed under arrest.

Mark Cassidy, 28, of Quincy, was charged with marked lanes violation, reckless operation of a motor vehicle, failing to stop for police, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, stop sign violation, red light violation and speeding.

PoliceLog

Friday, 12/28

Charles Chafin, 55, 32 Tudor St., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

Saturday, 12/29

Edward DeSantis, 53, 12 Bates St., Revere, was arrested on warrants and operating motor vehicle with suspended license.

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Year in Review:Balancing Prosperity and Priorities

Year in Review:Balancing Prosperity and Priorities

The year 2018 saw many changes in Chelsea as the city tried to balance prosperity with priorities all year long. While new investment poured in, residents struggled to stay in the city and schools grappled with budget cuts. Meanwhile, public transit increased substantially in a positive direction with the introduction of the new Silver Line service.

• Flooding becomes a major issue after a Jan. 4 blizzard and a March 2 storm, both of which occur during substantial high tides. The Jan. 4 blizzard caused a huge storm surge that flooded many parts of the city and even shut down operations at the Chelsea Street Bridge.

• The New England Flower Exchange celebrates its first Valentine’s Day holiday at its new location on Second Street after being in Boston’s South End for the past 50 years. The new facility has been brought online seamlessly.

• Wynn CEO Steve Wynn seemed to be in control of his company and the project in Everett until late January, when he was accused of sexual misconduct in a Wall Street Journal report. The allegations quickly gathered steam, and by February Wynn had resigned from the company and the license for the Everett casino was in jeopardy and the project to be moving forward “at risk.” The new CEO became Matt Maddox and the company saw huge amounts of turnover throughout the year. By the end of 2018, the license for the Everett site was still in limbo and an investigation into the matter still had yet to be revealed – having been delayed for months.

• City Manager Tom Ambrosino says in his State of the City on Feb. 26 that now is not the time to save up money, but rather the time to continue investing in the City and its residents. He announces several key programs for the upcoming year.

• Sen. Sal DiDomenico is involved in a heated and intense bid for the office of Senate President over several months, but in the summer comes up just short in getting the votes necessary to prevail. Sen. President Karen Spilka gets the nod instead, but DiDomenico remains the assistant majority leader and ends up coming out of the battle in a very good position of leadership.

• Students at Chelsea High stage a walk-out in regard to school safety and school shootings on March 15. Despite lots of snow, thousands of students take to the Stadium for the one-hour protest.

•YIHE company returns to the City with a new plan for the old Forbes site in the Mill Hill neighborhood. They start the process in April with a scaled down version of their previous plan, but reviews of the project continue throughout the year and into 2019.

• The new Silver Line SL-3 service debuts on Saturday, April 21, in Chelsea. The service starts out a little slow, but by December the MBTA reports that ridership has exceeded its estimates.

• The Chelsea Soldiers’ Home secured a $70 million budget item from the federal government in April that allowed the replacement of the Quigley Hospital to move forward. The Community Living Center has a groundbreaking in the fall and construction is ongoing in the new year.

• The Chelsea Walk is transformed throughout the spring, summer and fall in a unique placemaking partnership between the City and GreenRoots. At the end, there is a new mural on the Walk and more activity. New things are also planned for the Walk in 2019.

• A $3.1 million School Budget gap hits the School Department hard, with numerous cuts reported to key school services. Th School Department, City and state grapple with the issue all summer long, but no resolution to the issue emerges at the end of the legislative session. The school funding fix is still outstanding, and no fix has yet been passed to help districts like Chelsea, who have been penalized mistakenly by a new formula.

• Chelsea High sophomore track star Stephanie Simon caps off a stellar year by heading to the National Track Meet in North Carolina over the summer. She placed 15th in the high jump and 27th in the triple jump out of a field of athletes from around the nation.

• Students at the Clark Avenue Middle School are ecstatic to return to school on Aug. 29, and that’s because they were able to enter their brand new building for the first time. The Clark Avenue premiered to excited parents and students for the new school term after many years of construction.

• The Sept. 4 Primary Election features many surprises, but the biggest headline of the night, however, was when Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley upset sitting Congressman Michael Capuano decidedly. Capuano had campaigned hugely in Chelsea, and won here with 54 percent of the vote. However, a strong Boston turnout propelled Pressley to an big win. Pressley also had notable support in Chelsea from Council President Damali Vidot and School Committeeman Julio Hernandez.

• The Two-Way Broadway proposal gathers steam, but fizzles out as residents and elected officials protest the change vehemently. That came after a late-August approval of the plan by the Traffic Commission. However, in September, it fails to get past the City Council. Broadway will remain a one-way street.

• Supt. Mary Bourque surprises most in late December when she announces she will retire at the end of 2019, pledging to help the School Committee with a new superintendent search throughout the year.

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Police Briefs 12-13-2018

Police Briefs 12-13-2018

LIQUOR STORE DRAMA

On Nov. 26, at approximately 7:23 p.m., while assigned to the Bellingham Square area on foot a CPD officer was dispatched to Heller’s Liquor Mart, 429 Broadway, for a report of a party harassing the store clerk. Upon arrival, the male party was still on scene, inside the store. The officer observed the male acting aggressively, verbally and physically, as if he was ready to fight someone. The CPD officer attempted to calm him down. At that point, the male took a fighting stance, bouncing back and forth. The subject then tried to strike the officer. The individual was eventually restrained after several officers arrived and took him into custody.

Jaime Abreu, 39, of Everett, was charged with assault and battery on a police officer, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and assault and battery.

BACK AND FORTH

On Nov. 30, at 1:59 a.m., officers were dispatched to 59 Central Ave. for a report of a 9-1-1 hang-up call made by a female. Officers later spotted the female acting irrationally exiting, and then entering, a motor vehicle. The female party was asked multiple times to provide her license and registration because she was in control of a motor vehicle on a public way. Based on the female’s party’s actions, Officers believed alcohol or drugs impaired her. The woman continued to refuse to answer or follow the officer’s instructions. At that point, she was placed under arrest. During the arrest, she continued to struggle with the officers and resist. She eventually was taken to the station to be processed.

Jill Ferreira, 47, of Cambridge, was charged with intimidating a witness, being a motor vehicle operator refusing to identify, and resisting arrest.

Police Log

Monday, 11/26

Jaime Abreu, 39, 130 Bow St., Everett, was arrested for assault and battery on a police officer, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and assault and battery.

Wednesday, 11/28

Doroteo Perez, 57, 116 Shurtleff St., Chelsea, was arrested for ordinance violation, dangerous weapons and trespassing.

Friday, 11/30

Jill Ferreira, 47, 341 Broadway, Cambridge, was arrested for witness intimidation, motor vehicle operator refusing to identify self and resisting arrest.

Ralph Ovide, 26, 25 Carmel St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant and shoplifting.

Saturday, 12/1

Anita Chamizo, 37, 855 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for violating Harassment prevention order.

Sunday, 12/2

Ramon Pagan, 57, 126 Maverick St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing.

Christian Ramos, 23, 182 Parish St., East Boston, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended license, warrant and speeding.

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Police Briefs 12-06-2018

Police Briefs 12-06-2018

Tuesday, 11/20

Ana Gonzalez, 59, 90 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

David Henao-Jimenez, 19, 121 Union St., Everett, was arrested for speeding, unlicensed operation of motor vehicle and possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle.

Wednesday, 11/21                                                                                                                

Maria Ortiz, 49, 172 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Saturday, 11/24

Faisal Yerow, 23, 180 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a probation warrant.

Christina Belcher, 412, 550 Ferry St., Everett, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Edwin Ibanez, 30, 589 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for ordinance violation, alcoholic beverage/marijuana/THC, disorderly conduct, assault, disturbing the peace and threat to commit a crime.

Sunday, 11/25

Gabriel Castillo, 25, 9 Southend, Lynn, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, speeding and warrants.


THREATENED WOMAN

On Nov. 24, at 7:32 p.m., officers were dispatched to 1 Marlborough St. for a report of a male party following and threatening a female party. The female victim stated that the male followed her from the area of 400 Broadway. During this time she told officers he was making inappropriate comments to her. At one point he walked in front of her and blocked her path while escalating the comments to threats to cause her harm. Witnesses interceded, and the male fled the area.

A short time later he was positively identified and placed into custody.

Edwin Ibanez, 30, of 589 Broadway, was charged with marijuana violation, disorderly conduct (subsequent offense), assault, disturbing the peace, and threatening to commit a crime.

MAN PULLS KNIFE AT DAY CENTER

On Nov. 14, at approximately 9 a.m., CPD officers were dispatched to 738 Broadway, the Pentecostal Church resource center for a report of a male with a knife. Upon arrival, the victim stated that the man at the scene pulled a knife on him. A knife was found on the subject, and he was placed under arrest.

Michael Catino, 34, of Malden, was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

DANCIN’ IN THE STREETS

On Nov. 24, at 11 a.m., officers observed an intoxicated female causing a disturbance on Broadway. The officers tried to ascertain the woman’s identity but were answered with threats and derogatory comments. The woman continued to disregard the officer’s commands while impeding pedestrian and motor vehicle traffic. She was placed under arrest.

Christina Belcher, 41, of Everett, was charged with disorderly conduct.

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Planning Bd Recommends Zoning Changes,Approves Parkway Peruvian Restaurant

Planning Bd Recommends Zoning Changes,Approves Parkway Peruvian Restaurant

The Planning Board recommended approval to two changes to the City’s zoning ordinances on Tuesday night.

The first change affects the Naval Hospital Residential and Commercial Districts, also known as the Admiral’s Hill area of the city.

In the 1980s, the city slackened many building and zoning regulations for the district in an effort to encourage development, according to Lad Dell, the city’s planning and land use administrator.

“People were able to develop without much regulation at all,” said Dell.

A moratorium on building in the district was recently extended to the end of the year by City Manager Thomas Ambrosino as the City worked on new regulations for the district.

The new ordinance recommended by the Planning Board for approval by the City Council allows for four- to six-unit buildings to be constructed by right, with a special permit required for any construction above six units.

The ordinance brought before the Planning Board allowed for building heights of 2 ½ stories and 35 feet. The board amended the ordinance to allow for a building height of 40 feet.

“I would suggest that we add the half a story and a little height to allow for garages,” said John DePriest, the City’s planning director.

City Councillor Roy Avellaneda said the amendment was in line with Council subcommittee discussions on the ordinance to increase building height to make it easier to build garages.

The residents who spoke during the public hearing on the zoning amendment were supportive.

“It looks like this is an effort to protect the character of the neighborhood and not overload our streets,” said Christine Shields.

The second zoning amendment would allow for residential units on the first floor of buildings in the Retail Business District by special permit, as long as those units are not on Broadway.

Two years ago, a zoning amendment banned residential units on the first floor in the Broadway corridor. If the new amendment is approved by the City Council, residential units will still be banned on the first floor on Broadway itself, but could be allowed under special permit on other streets near Broadway in the zoning district.

  • In other Planning Board business, the developers of the massive 1 Forbes Street project withdrew their plans for the project.

But rather than a massive blow to development in the City, it was a procedural move that gives developers more time to fully present the project to a full Planning Board, according to Paul Feldman, who is representing the developer for the 630-unit residential and office building project.

“The public hearing on this was opened on Sept. 22, and at that time, there were a couple of vacancies on the board and a member who was not present,” said Feldman. “With a nine member board, to get site approval, we need six votes.”

Feldman said developers are withdrawing the site plan, but immediately refiling it to start the clock over on the hearing process. He said he expects the project to be back before the Planning Board at its Dec. 18 meeting.

“We would like the participation of all nine members, or all that can attend,” said Feldman.

  • Tuesday night, the board also approved a special permit for a 16-seat Peruvian bistro-type restaurant at the site of a former liquor store on 22 Adams St.

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Chelsea Collaborative Holds Thanksgiving Dinner:Launch of Immigration Justice Bond Fund Announced

Chelsea Collaborative Holds Thanksgiving Dinner:Launch of Immigration Justice Bond Fund Announced

The Chelsea Collaborative hosted its annual Thanksgiving Dinner last Thursday at its headquarters at 318 Broadway.

Collaborative President Gladys Vega and her staff welcomed members of the community, who enjoyed a delicious buffet dinner and desserts. There was also a cotton candy station for children.

A large group of staff members and volunteers, led by Board President Rosalba Medina, helped serve the many food items to the guests in attendance.

But this year the celebration was a little different as the Collaborative announced the launch of the Immigrant Justice Bond Fund, in conjunction with EECO organization and the Episcopal City Mission that includes the St. Luke’s Church, Chelsea.

The fund is being set up to assist family members with people in detention centers to pay bonds established by immigration judges, with the purpose of reuniting them with their loved ones.

The Collaborative works hard with relatives who have come to its offices for assistance in locating their loved ones who have been detained by immigration agents. During the effort to locate and to be able to acquire the pro-bono services of lawyers, the Collaborative is faced with the obstacle of not having the necessary funds to help people out of detention.

It is for this reason that the Collaborative has joined forces with ECCO and Episcopal City Mission to find financial alternatives to pay bond. Chelsea Collaborative is honored to now be an organization that can count on these funds and get mothers and fathers out of detention centers.

Once the funds are used, payment agreements will be established so that these funds can always be available to other people in detention. After being released, people will be connected with legal and social resources to establish an individual plan for each family.

During the speaking program, Vega stated that the Collaborative was ready to assist residents with the agency’s many services and programs, and also to direct them to the appropriate groups for legal advice.

Yessenia Alfaro, deputy director at the Collaborative, felt the event, that drew a large turnout on a night that the first snowstorm of the season was approaching, was a huge success.

“It’s a blessing that so many people came here to tonight to celebrate Thanksgiving with us, and we’re grateful for our partnership with the ECCO organization and Episcopal City Mission in launching this important fund,” said Alfaro.

Several residents thanked Gladys Vega for her outstanding leadership of the Collaborative and the agency’s continuing diligence in helping all members of the community.

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Ambrosino: ‘Board Made a Mistake’ in Denying Traggorth Proposal

Ambrosino: ‘Board Made a Mistake’ in Denying Traggorth Proposal

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said the City would defend the Zoning Board of Appeals’ (ZBA) September decision to deny an affordable housing project on upper Broadway, but at the same time he said he personally believes the ZBA made a “huge mistake.”

The ZBA denied the 42 unit affordable- and market-rate residential development at 1001 Broadway in a narrow vote that was based on creating more homeownership opportunities in the City. The project included nine units of market-rate housing and enhanced access to the Mill Creek waterfront.

And Ambrosino said, personally, he feels like the Board should have vote for the project.

“Personally, I think the Board made a big mistake in denying that project,” he said. “Affordable housing is the single most critical issue facing the city and to reject an affordable housing project is ludicrous. It’s the single biggest issue I hear about every week in this office. Denying that project will not create one single unit of home ownership.”

Last week, developers Traggorth and The Neighborhood Developers (TND) indicated they would appeal the decision in Suffolk Superior Court, believing that the project had ample community support.

Ambrosino said the City would defend the decision to deny, as it does have to, but his personal opinion differs.

“The City will defend the decision of the Board of Appeals,” he said. “My personal opinion is I like the project and supported the project. I wish them well (in their appeal).”

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