Wynn Plans to Develop Employee Parking Near Produce Center

Wynn Plans to Develop Employee Parking Near Produce Center

Plans for an off-site employee parking lot with hundreds of spaces to handle a large percentage of the Wynn Everett workforce were unveiled in a state environmental filing last week, and the parking lot is tentatively sited somewhere in Produce Center on the Everett/Chelsea line.

The news came deep within Wynn’s recent filing last week of its supplemental environmental reports on traffic and parking with state environmental regulators. While a majority of the plan concentrates on traffic mitigation in Charlestown’s Sullivan Square area, one piece of the overall plan is to locate employee parking off-site.

According to the plan in the filing, some 800 spaces would be contracted off-site by Wynn, though not all of them would be located in area near the Produce Center.

“While no specific parking site has been identified for the Everett employee parking lot, the plan is to locate it in the industrial southeast quadrant of Everett, generally south of Revere Beach Parkway (Route 16) and east of Broadway (Route 99),” read the filing. “The predicted modes of Project employee travel on Fridays and Saturdays by percentage and person trips, as shown, are 41%, of employees are expected to drive and park at the employee off-site parking facilities and 20% of employees are expected to travel to the Project via the Orange Line. Another 20% of employees will use the neighborhood shuttle, and the remaining 19% will use the other travel modes…The Proponent plans to lease up to 800 spaces at three off-site parking facilities to accommodate employee parking and has confirmed with the operators that sufficient capacity is available at the potential lease locations to accommodate the number of spaces referenced.”

Wynn would also run 24-hour shuttle buses from the off-site parking facility to its casino at Everett’s Lower Broadway area, which is only minutes from the proposed lot location on the Everett/Chelsea line.

“Employees using single-occupancy vehicles to travel to work will be required to park at designated off-site locations and ride a shuttle bus to the Project Site. The employee shuttle buses will be operated by the Proponent (or contracted through a third party vendor) and will be a free service for employees of the Project validated by their security badges,” read the filing. “Three separate employee shuttle bus routes will operate between the Project’s employee entrance and off-site employee parking facilities in Medford adjacent to Wellington Station, Malden at a downtown garage, and potentially in Everett at a location to be determined.”

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Chelsea Man Arraigned on Firearm Offenses

Chelsea Man Arraigned on Firearm Offenses

A Chelsea man injured in a police-involved shooting two weeks ago was held on high bail during his arraignment last Friday, Feb. 13, at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Igor Peulic, 32, of Chelsea, was arraigned from his hospital bed on charges of unlawful possession of a firearm, unlawful possession of ammunition, carrying a loaded firearm, discharging a firearm within 500 feet of a building, and assault with a dangerous weapon. At the request of Assistant District Attorney Philip Cheng, Chelsea District Court Judge Matthew Nestor set bail at $25,000.

According to prosecutors, Chelsea Police officers on patrol in Bellingham Square at approximately 12:30 a.m. Feb. 1 saw and heard gunshots in the area of the Chelsea Walk. Preliminary evidence from witness statements, surveillance images, and other sources indicates that the gunman, later identified as Peulic, fired several shots at an unoccupied vehicle outside the establishment. No one was struck by the gunfire.

Peulic led police on a foot pursuit from Broadway to 5th Street and then onto Chestnut Street as additional officers responded to the scene from various locations. Peulic allegedly ignored officers’ commands to drop his weapon. The preliminary evidence suggests that an officer discharged his service weapon on Chestnut Street, striking Peulic once in the abdomen. Peulic’s firearm – a loaded Dan Wesson .357 long barrel revolver – was recovered from the scene, prosecutors said.

Officers immediately called for medical assistance and administered first aid. Peulic was transported to Massachusetts General Hospital, where he continues to undergo treatment.

Suffolk prosecutors and State Police detectives assigned to the Suffolk DA’s office are investigating the incident, and a separate examination is also being conducted by the Chelsea Police Department’s Professional Standards Division – Critical Incident Review Team. This review will focus on existing policy, tactics, and training as they relate to the use of force in this situation.

Peulic is represented by David Yannetti. He returns to court March 11.

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Chelsea Firefighters Battle a 2-Alarm Fire on Broadway

Chelsea Firefighters Battle a 2-Alarm Fire on Broadway

ffChelsea Firefighters from the Mill Hill Station were on the run last Sunday, jumping from a 3-alarm fire in Revere to a 2-alarm fire on Broadway Chelsea.

On Sunday, February 1st, at 1:20 p.m., the fire department responded to the report of a building fire at 759 Broadway. Engine 3 and Ladder 2 were first to arrive on scene from the Mill Hill Station and reported smoke showing from the 2nd floor. The crews from Engine 3 and Ladder 2 had just returned to the station a couple of hours prior to this call from assisting the Revere Fire Department battle a 3-alarm fire.

Deputy Chief Robert Zalewski arrived on scene and upgraded the incident to a “Working Fire” which brought Chelsea Tower 1 and Chelsea Engine 1 to the scene. Deputy Zalewski quickly ordered a 2nd Alarm, as the fire was burning through the exterior walls in the occupied six-unit building.

The fire operation was further complicated due to a pick up truck blocking access to a fire hydrant on Broadway which delayed getting water to Engine 3.

Crews worked for more than an hour to extinguish the fire. All 6 families were displaced from the fire and relocated by the Red Cross. No occupants were injured.

Mutual Aid was called in from Everett, Revere, Malden, Winthrop, Somerville, and Medford to assist Chelsea firefighters control the fire. Boston Engine 5 and Boston Ladder 21 covered Central Station while Somerville Engine 2 covered the Mill Hill Station.

The fire is currently under investigation.

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Towne Place Suites Set to Open in February

Towne Place Suites Set to Open in February

Maureen Foley (left) and Dakeya Christmas of Colwen Hotels in the comfortable and cozy lobby at the Chelsea Residence Inn this week. Both said that the expansion of hotels in Chelsea is all about the regions need for more rooms to meet the booming demand of conventions and international tourists. The company has two hotels in the works in Chelsea, with the Towne Place Suites on Marginal Street set to open in mid-February.

Maureen Foley (left) and Dakeya Christmas of Colwen Hotels in the comfortable and cozy lobby at the Chelsea Residence Inn this week. Both said that the expansion of hotels
in Chelsea is all about the regions need for more rooms to meet the booming demand of conventions and international
tourists. The company has two hotels in the works in Chelsea, with the Towne Place Suites on Marginal Street set to open in mid-February.

Some 14 years ago when Colwen Hotels was first considering putting a hotel in Chelsea, it was all about proximity to the airport.

Now, with the group preparing to open its second hotel – the Towne Place Suites on Marginal Street – on Feb. 16 or 17 and having two more Chelsea hotels in the works, the focus has little to nothing to do with the airport.

“The idea originally started as a hotel for the airport because of the airlines,” said Maureen Foley of Colwen. “As it happened, you had the growth at the Boston Convention Center and international tourism really took off and it all created the perfect storm for us.”

In fact, the focus on Chelsea by Colwen has everything to do nowadays with the hot commodity of the Boston area for conventions and international travel and Chelsea’s close proximity to the engine of the region’s booming economy.

“I think economically people are seeing the growth in Boston and seeing that it’s a booming city and the opportunities are there,” said Foley. “They need more hotel rooms and the time is right economically. We do play into the proximity of Chelsea all the time. We are very close to Boston and in a lot of cases we’re closer to Boston than many parts of Boston. However, having the background on what’s going on in the Boston area really changes how you view this as a whole. It’s not just about another hotel in Chelsea. Boston and the entire area are really booming for conventions and tourism.”

As proof of that, according to Smith Travel Research, Boston’s hotel occupancy rates (which include Chelsea) ranked 7th in the top 25 market areas in 2013. That was behind prime places like New York, Hawaii, Miami Beach, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The occupancy rate for 2013 was around 73 percent.

This year, the 2015 projections for occupancy are way up.

The Pinnacle Group predicts that Boston occupancy rates will be at 80 percent this year, which is up 7 percent from 2013. Meanwhile, the average room cost per night is predicted to be $255.94. Those numbers would be some of the best occupancy rates and room rates for just about any market in the United States.

Meanwhile, the Boston Convention Center in South Boston’s Seaport District is driving the growth in hotels tremendously and many guests in Chelsea’s hotels look to be those heading to the Seaport District.

Foley said she believes that a lot of hotel spillover from the Seaport District does end up in Chelsea, and that will really be true once the Silver Line is completed from the Seaport to the Mystic Mall.

“That will be an absolute game changer,” she said.

As it is now, Boston is 39th on the list of having the most International meetings in a market – meetings that take place at the Boston Convention Center or the Hynes Convention Center.

While 39th sounds like an “iffy” proposition, that worldwide number is higher than Washington, D.C. (43rd), New York City (64th) and Chicago (65th).

The number is also tempered by the fact that the Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau cannot book some of the largest conventions due to the fact that the Greater Boston area doesn’t have enough hotel rooms to handle such things.

Therein lays the drive behind the expansion of hotels in Chelsea – in places like Marginal Street and the upper end of Broadway where one would have never thought a hotel would land.

Foley said it probably doesn’t make sense to the naked eye, but once one understands the business model and the region’s needs that lie behind such decisions, it makes far more sense.

“The Convention and Visitors Bureau cannot host some of the largest conventions because we don’t have enough rooms,” she said. “We can really compete as a convention city if we build more hotel rooms.”

That’s the model for so many hotel companies like Colwen and the Wyndham for expansion.

Colwen will open its Homewood Suites by Hilton across from Chelsea High School in November.

In Cambridge, near the Somerville line, they are set to open a Fairfield Inn & Suites later this year.

The all new Marriott brand, the AC Hotel, is currently under construction by Colwen at Station’s Landing in Medford. Meanwhile, Colwen is planning an Autograph by Marriott hotel for Somerville’s Assembly Row in the near future.

Another Colwen AC Hotel with 200 rooms has been approved for the Ink Block development area in Boston’s South End where the Boston Herald used to operate.

All of the hotels from Colwen are geared to a particular market, though. That market is the Millennial Generation that, demographically speaking, shuns the ritzy confines of a luxury hotel and embraces smaller, less expensive hotels with solid amenities and nice, open lobby/social spaces.

“The Millennials want a less expensive place to stay with limited services and not so much a luxury hotel,” she said. “We think that we’ll see a lot of change towards that. They want their free Wi-Fi. They want to be in a fun area and they want to sit in lobbies and socialize. That’s exactly what we offer.”

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Wynn Purchases Monsanto Site for $35 Million: Acquisition Means the Company Now Hits the ‘Go’ Button

Wynn Purchases Monsanto Site for $35 Million: Acquisition Means the Company Now Hits the ‘Go’ Button

The controversial land deal on lower Broadway slated to hold the new Wynn casino passed papers on Monday, with Wynn purchasing the former Monsanto Chemical property for $35 million from FBT Everett.

On Tuesday, City leaders had planned to celebrate the milestone at a gathering on the property, but the extreme cold weather drove the celebration indoors.

Numerous members of Everett United, as well as elected officials and a herd of Boston news media members crowded the Council Chambers for the jovial ceremony – where Mayor Carlo DeMaria gave Wynn’s Bob DeSalvio a new curbside trash bin as a gag gift to welcome them as new property owners in the City.

The mayor referenced the Lower Broadway Planning process that started in 2008 and how the Wynn project unexpectedly fit right into those plans. He said it has been a long road, but one that he’s glad the City took.

“A lot of people weren’t on board at first,” he said. “There was a lot of hesitation in the city about a casino. Many on the City Council were questioning it. My wife and I had long conversations about it every day…I wanted to build something great for the city and soon this became a no-brainer. At one point, [former] Gov. [William] Weld took me aside and told me I had to do it and he laid out the reasons why. He was right.”

DeSalvio said there was nothing that could stop Wynn from developing the resort now that the land had been purchased and cleared.

“With this land transaction and our arrival, nothing gets in our way from moving forward,” he said. “We look forward to getting started with remediation. We know how important that clean up is to you. We know how important it is for you to reconnect with the waterfront. We’re going to be taking the next six months to make sure that site is cleaned up and we’re coming out of the ground this summer and opening late 2017.”

Wynn now has full ownership and control over the property and company officials said that clears the way for site cleanup and construction to move forward. That will likely take place after permitting is completed in the next few months.

Wynn officials in a press release on Monday said the purchase was the most significant advancement on the project since being awarded the license last September.

Added DeSalvio, “Today, we hit the ‘go’ button and we’re not stopping until a spectacular Wynn Resort with a new waterfront public park for all to access and enjoy is completed.”

The long-vacant property has been and continues to be the source of a great amount of criticism about the Wynn project.

On Monday – the same day the sale was finalized – the City of Boston filed a lawsuit against the Massachusetts Gaming Commission (MGC) under the auspices, partially, that the state had been defrauded by the land deal.

The genesis of those complaints arise from the allegation that Revere businessman Charlie Lightbody had been a one-time partner in FBT Everett, but was barred from ownership rights due to the regulations set by the MGC. He had alleged that he was out of the partnership before Wynn began negotiations on the property, but an MGC investigation showed cause for pause as to whether that had happened.

There is currently a case in state and federal court related to Lightbody and some other owners about whether or not they misled investigators and committed wire fraud in the deal.

Through all that, though, the MGC had always contended that Wynn Resorts was not aware or a party to any of those situations. The MGC went so far as to require the owners of the property to reduce their price from $75 million to $35 million in light of the controversy. They also required the partners to sign an affidavit that stated no “unspoken” or “secret” partners would gain from the sale of the land.

The federal and state cases are still working their way through both levels of court.

Seth Daniel can be reached by e-mail at seth@reverejournal.com

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Highest Honors for the “The Hawk”: Richie Halas Inducted in to Candlepin Hall of Fame

Highest Honors for the “The Hawk”: Richie Halas Inducted in to Candlepin Hall of Fame

Pictured at the ICBA Hall of Fame Banquet are, from left, Charlie Anderson, Barbara Bambery, Hall of Fame inductee Richie Halas, Linda Halas, Courtney Halas, Colby Halas O’Connor, and Michael O’Connor.

Pictured at the ICBA Hall of Fame Banquet are, from left, Charlie Anderson, Barbara Bambery, Hall of Fame inductee
Richie Halas, Linda Halas, Courtney Halas, Colby Halas O’Connor, and Michael O’Connor.

By the time Richie “Hawk” Halas was a senior at Chelsea High School, he had already made appearances on Jim Britt’s “Winning Pins” and Don Gillis’ “Candlepin Bowling” television shows.
Halas, who grew up bowling at George Michelson’s Broadway Lanes atop Slaton’s, was just beginning a majestic career in the popular sport that drew consistently high ratings each week on Channel 5.
Halas rose to the top echelon of bowling, becoming a regular on television and a popular competitor and respected sportsman on the professional tour.
Halas was formally recognized as one of the all-time greats in October, earning induction in to the International Candlepin Hall of Fame at an awards banquet held at DiBurro’s Function Facility in Haverhill.
With his wife, Linda, and his daughters, Colby and Courtney, in attendance, Halas accepted the beautiful plaque that is given to each bowling legend at the banquet.
Halas was typically humble in his acceptance speech, telling the capacity crowd, “When I started bowling 55 years ago, I never envisioned that one day I would become a part of this esteemed Hall of Fame group. I am truly honored to be joining the candlepin bowling elite.”
He mentioned some of the other greats with whom he competed in the sport, including Joe Donovan, Pete Ianuzzo, Fran Onorato, Charlie Jutras, Mike Morgan, and his brother, the late Tom Morgan.
Mike Morgan, one of Halas’s opponents on the Don Gillis show, said he was touched by the speech.
“That was awesome,” said Morgan. “I’m so grateful to Richie that he mentioned my brother, Tom, in his remarks.”
Halas also thanked Chucky Vozzella, proprietor of Central Park Lanes in East Boston, for his efforts in “keeping the sport going strong.” Halas competes for the Central Park team in the Friday Night Pro League.
Halas saved his best for last, noting that “I would not be standing here today accepting this award without the support, understanding, and love of my family, my wife, Linda, my two daughters, Colby and Courtney, and my mother, Phyllis. Thank you.
Jonathan Boudreau, one of the up and coming stars in the sport, said he considers Hawk Halas a role model for young bowlers like himself.
“I look up to Hawk Halas – he’s a great guy, a class act, and one of better bowlers the game has ever seen,” said Boudreau. “I hope I can achieve all he has in this game and leave the lasting impression on others as he has in his incredible career as a professional bowler.”

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Thanksgiving can be Nightmare Holiday for Food Addicts

Thanksgiving can be Nightmare Holiday for Food Addicts

Per the rules of Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), the names have been changed to protect the identity of the group members, though their places of residence have stayed the same.

The thought of Turkey Day brings fond memories for most of America, just for the fact that it’s simple: eat, sleep, eat again, eat a third time and then catch up with relatives.

For most, it’s an annual ticket to stuffing oneself to the limit; that one day when families eat until they can’t stand up. Of course, it all ends after the big meal, and most everyone goes back to his or her regular eating habits.

But for some, Thanksgiving eating habits don’t stop at midnight on Nov. 27, but continue on day in and day out. Those who have an addiction to food – a number that is increasingly on the rise – find the holidays a particularly challenging time, let alone every other day.

The addiction to food is a curious one in that it doesn’t get as much attention as other addictions such as alcohol and drugs, but it often works hand-in-hand with those addictions. Too often, it is the true cause and underlying problem leading to the other addictions.

Deb from Chelsea, now a 53 year old emergency room nurse, was a foul-mouthed, single mother who had eaten “like an animal” since she was a little girl in Chelsea. It led her to some dark places, she said, but she never knew until 26 years ago that her addiction to eating was the compass directing her disastrous life.

“I was your worst nightmare,” she said in a recent interview. “If you saw me coming, yelling and screaming and being obnoxious, you’d have wanted to get away from me. This program, FA, totally changed my life every way you could possibly imagine. I was over 350 pounds, drug addicted and an alcoholic. I was a total horror show. I was a single-mom on welfare and in the apartment where I lived in Chelsea, I had no heat for six years because I didn’t pay my bill. My daughter was growing up with a crazy mother. All of my addictions offset one another and it all led to me eating more. I knew I was an alcoholic; I knew I was a drug addict. I had no idea I was a food addict and that was my main problem. I just thought that’s how I was – that it was my lot in life to eat and die fat.”

That was 26 years ago, when she was 33, and still today as she talks about it, tears come to her eyes. That’s because, she said, she reached a point where she could go no further, and she saw that she was destroying her 9-year-old daughter. The tears, though, come more from the fact that she is now a successful, healthy woman with two loving grandchildren; a life that was turned around through the course of a few key events.

She recalled asking God, out loud in her kitchen, to take all the pills and food and booze away.

“Little by little, the pills went out of my life,” she said.

That led her, eventually, to read a little notice in the Chelsea Record about a food addict meeting, and later to take the advice of a relative to attend one of the meetings.

“I had never heard people talking about an addiction to food, but I listened,” she said. “Some 26 years later, my life is good now. I don’t think about food. The big thing is I don’t drink, drug, or overeat and I don’t want to. Before, I couldn’t have imagined my life for one day without all the above. Before I had an existence; now I have a life.”

Deb’s story, though not so uncommon, is an extreme, and not all food addicts have out-of-control lives.

Deb and Carol, also from Chelsea, have been leaning on one another for support and attending FA meetings for decades. They would have never met had it not been for an addiction to food.

“Our lives would have never ever crossed paths,” said Carol. “I was a good, upstanding citizen, but I was destroying myself with food. I didn’t drink, didn’t drug, stayed home and took care of my kids – but I couldn’t stop eating.”

Now 85, Carol was 43 when she first came to a meeting and weighed 250 pounds. Today, she weighs half that, and she’s been that way for decades.

Carol said her story wasn’t that of an out-of-control woman, but rather a woman who would steal the kids’ Halloween candy and gorge herself in private; who would put away the leftovers from Thanksgiving Dinner and stuff herself to capacity in the process.

“I did every diet,” she said. “A new diet would come out and I would be the one to tell you about it. I would diet three months, look good and feel good. Then, I would take one bite and it was gone. I couldn’t stop. I didn’t think of myself as an addict, but I was…This program saved my life. This is a program for addiction to food and not a diet club. That was the difference.”

She said FA taught her to put down the food. She stopped eating between meals and began eating healthy food only. There is no more binging, and even on Thanksgiving her meal is a sensible one.

“Here I am and I’m happy and I lost 125 pounds and that was 42 years ago,” she said. “My life is a great life and I have a clean bill of health. I am healthier at 85 than I was at 43. I was full of negativity, fear and doubt. Today, I have none of that.”

Brenda from Revere is a relative newcomer to the FA group – having come to her first meeting 12 years ago.

Karen, now 50, wasn’t out of control, but food dominated her life.

She would hide food.

She would go out “for a drive,” and sneak snacks at the fast food drive thru. She was always making excuses as to why she needed to run errands, mostly because errands led to food.

“I really was like an alcoholic, but the addiction is to food,” she said. “I couldn’t stop eating no matter what. I despised myself so much.”

At 38, Brenda said she had one knee replacement, had anxiety, heart palpitations and very high blood pressure. Besides the physical, she said she was moody and mean – often short-tempered and usually unhappy.

After having lived in Colorado, she moved back to Massachusetts and settled in Revere. Not long after landing here, a cousin told her about the FA program and she decided to give it a try – thinking maybe it might reveal some new “magic key to the kingdom.”

However, what it revealed was her addiction.

“I had never heard people say they couldn’t stop eating and were addicted,” she said. “It was a breakthrough because it’s what I was doing. When I put the food down, my life got better. I lost 95 pounds and kept it off with no medications, no surgeries. I have a better relationship with my family. I’m calm, kind, nice, and I’m not in debt. I got married and I’m a size 6 and that hasn’t changed. I don’t miss any of it.”

The tie that binds these three local women is the FA program, a program that once existed as Overeaters Anonymous (OA) until 1998 when it became FA. With its founding traced back to Chelsea, Everett and Revere, FA broke off from OA after having developed a unique regimen that was different from OA. FA’s 12-step program is patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous. Members say it’s not based on guilt, and it’s not religious, but is spiritually based. Most importantly, it’s a strong network of men and women helping one another with an addiction that often flies under the radar.

FA has the following meetings available in Chelsea, Everett and Charlestown.

  • Everett and Chelsea, Monday and Weds. nights at Soldiers Home
  • Chelsea, Beth Israel HC on Broadway, Friday mornings
  • Everett, Parlin Library, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.
  • Whidden Hospital, Saturdays
  • Charlestown, Spaulding Rehab, Mondays
  • Arlington, Wednesdays, 7 p.m.
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Free Legal Services Severely Stretched to Accommodate Arriving Children, Parents

Free Legal Services Severely Stretched to Accommodate Arriving Children, Parents

Ten-month-old Belen has a court date.

The smiling baby at some point will have to go before a judge and plead his case as to why he should not be deported from Chelsea after having left El Salvador and crossed the southern U.S. border recently with his mother.

Were it not for Suffolk University Legal Services, the little tyke – who cannot yet speak – would be expected to stand alone before a federal Immigration Court judge and explain why he qualifies for political asylum in the U.S.

It would be more than a mouthful for the baby boy.

“The picture you have of situations like this is profound,” said Steve Callahan, a law professor at Boston University who has worked with Suffolk Law for years. “Picture this baby or a 5-year-old boy standing in front of a judge with no one by his side having to argue his case intelligently before a judge. The law is just and humane, but this makes no sense. You see babies who have court dates and have to be in other states to plead their cases. This is what we see.”

For example, just last month Suffolk Law Program Director Ana Vaquerano welcomed a mother and her 5-year-old boy into the Chelsea office.

The boy was to be in Atlanta in three days for a deportation hearing, and the mother had no possessions, not even any reliable shoes, and certainly no way to get the boy to Atlanta.

She was crying.

Vaquerano was crying.

The mother was willing to put the child on a plane alone if need be, somehow or some way.

Essentially, what had happened was the two came across the border illegally and were detained. Having family in Atlanta, they were sent there and told there would be a court date in Atlanta at some point. However, the family members in Atlanta were not able to keep them for very long, and sent the mother and child packing.

They ended up in Chelsea; they found out about the hearing only days prior.

Without pause, Vaquerano went to work.

“I told her not to worry,” she said. “I told here that we would find a way to get her and her son to Atlanta. We were going to find a way because we always do. We connected with a few people, friends at Logan Airport who had friends in the airlines. We used our network, and I was even willing to go to my church and try to get the money there. However, one day I came in and opened my e-mail and found an itinerary for a first-class flight to Atlanta on American Airlines for her and her 5-year-old. We had to do anything we could to keep this child from being deported and we were able to help. They made it to the court date and there is likely a legal remedy for them. Had she gone anywhere else, though, it wouldn’t have worked out. There just wasn’t any time.”

THE RECENT SURGE

Such situations aren’t entirely new for Suffolk Legal, which has been doing yeoman’s work on Broadway Chelsea for some 30 years. However, the frequency and desperation of the situations has had a barnstorming effect on the organization – with two young lawyers being recruited in to offer free services once a week to accommodate the surging need for help in navigating an immigration system that has been turned upside down by the processing of huge numbers of illegal immigrants who have come over the U.S. Border from Central America in the last 10 months.

“These children started coming six months ago and they just keep coming and coming and coming to the office,” said Vaquerano. “I had only one lawyer working one day a week. It wasn’t enough and I didn’t know what to do. I had so many appointments you wouldn’t believe it. We were getting 20 appointments in two days and it was going all day long. One day we stayed until 7 p.m.”

The reinforcements that showed up at the Broadway office were attorneys Jason Corral and Amarilys Marrero, who agreed to come work for free to help – having formerly worked with Suffolk Legal through Catholic Charities.

Marrero said the story of the 5-year-old boy was one that worked out, and for every story that works out, many more do not.

“We see stories like that all the time, but that story is really the best case scenario,” she said. “Most don’t end that way. We talk to the court and the person at the court is only concerned about the law and maybe they should be, but we can’t convey to them how the person in the office is feeling and what they’re going through. We see what they’re going through, see them crying and do everything we can. Sometimes all we can do is cry with them.”

One of the major situations for the immigration court system is that despite entering the country illegally, the situation isn’t considered a criminal offense. That means that those facing Immigration Court hearings don’t qualify for public defenders to offer legal help. They either must find the money to pay for a private lawyer, or as in most cases, seek out free legal services in the form of places like Suffolk Legal.

That is one reason that the Immigration Courts have become so clogged due to the recent influx and a reason that court dates can be months or years in the future. Free legal services take more time, and the cases are inherently complex. Judges all over the country are prone to grant continuances and find legal remedies if at all possible – which takes time.

Corral said money has been funneled to enforcement on the border rather than to legal pathways and remedies for people caught at the border.

“The backlog right now in the courts is complicated and the cases take a lot of time to prepare,” he said. “We’re probably responsible for the backlog because we’ll go in and ask for more time to prepare. On the other hand, the judge doesn’t want to deport a child without finding out if they have a legal remedy. They’ll give two or three continuances to make sure. It comes down to the fact that nobody is paying for people like us and there are all these cases that nobody is paying for. There just aren’t enough resources to provide the legal pathway because everything has been dedicated to enforcement.”

INFLUX WASN’T UNEXPECTED

Corral said there have been people coming from Central America for several years.

Some came many years ago during the time of Civil War there and received Temporary Protected Status (TPS) from the government. Over the last decade, people from those countries have also been coming and most made it over illegally without getting caught.

He said he believes the difference now is that the border is more secure and people are willing to get caught and take their chances.

“I think the thing is that the media right now is reporting it as a crisis, but we’ve been dealing with this for years,” he said. “I remember writing a paper on this problem in 2008, which was six years ago. The difference now is that it escalated – it was building and building and now it’s escalated, but we recognized the situation six or seven years ago.”

DEPORTING OUR PROBLEMS; THOSE LEFT BEHIND

Part of the problem, all said, is that many of the countries where the influx is coming from are El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala, and those countries are facing brutal crime from violent youth gangs.

In many cases, Corral said, those gangs are comprised of young people who committed crimes in America and were deported to a country that couldn’t handle policing these newfound criminals.

“These are kids who lost hope,” he said. “They’ve been left behind by family or they’ve been deported from the U.S. and now they’re on the streets in a country they never knew. Essentially, we’re deporting back our youth problems to Central America where they cannot handle it. These kids get powerful and manipulate others and create a shadow government. They demand a ‘war tax’ or protection money. It’s almost what you’d be paying to a government if there was a real publicly funded government that could protect the people.”

The other kids that seem to be ruling the streets are those left behind many years ago by adults who have earned TPS status, have earned some other status or have existed here illegally for decades.

“A lot of times the people with TPS left a little one behind with the intention of being reunited,” he said. “They now have a teen-ager at home in their country that they never brought here. They have had a grandparent or another family member taking care of that teen-ager and they won’t do it any longer.”

Some of those young people flee to America; others stay on the streets.

THREE TYPICAL SITUATIONS

For many of those illegal immigrants who end up in Chelsea and seek out Suffolk Legal to help them navigate their cases, there are few remedies other than to seek political asylum.

For the children such as 5-year-olds or babies, there is often a legal remedy, but for those who have solid footing, it is often difficult.

“When they’re unaccompanied at the border and when their family situation is more secure, that is the hardest one to remedy because the only option is filing for asylum,” said Corral. “Asylum requires very specific conditions to be met…When the fear is from gang violence, we make our best case for political opinion or membership in a particular social group that is an anti-gang group. Unfortunately, the odds are against us in those cases.”

In other cases, there is a parent who can remedy the situation – a parent that the child has left their country to be reunited with. Most times that parent has legal status and, after a series of court sessions, can make make the situation into a good one. However, it isn’t that easy. Many times the parent has moved on over the years to another family; has remarried and started anew only to have a virtually unknown teen-ager show up from thousands of miles away.

“A lot of family members or parents end up not wanting them there and that can become abusive,” said Marrero. “Domestic violence is a big part of their story here. Many times they come to reunite with a parent who has remarried and started a new family. Many times the best stepfather in the world becomes the worst stepfather in the world. A lot of times these things happen because of economics and frustrations with immigration status. That happens a lot.”

Another all too common situation – as is potentially faced by Belen and his mother – is that the child has a legal remedy to stay, but the mother has no chance.

“All too often there’s a legal remedy for that kid, but no remedy for that mom in an asylum case,” said Corral. “It’s very possible there is asylum for the kid, but the mom will be made to stay and wait for her day in court – which could be years – and with all liklihood that she’ll be deported when that day in court comes. She’ll have to leave that child behind here in the U.S. That’s the chance they’re willing to take.”

DETERMINATION IS A TREND

When young people are taken into custody at the border, many times the first thing they do is pull out a cell phone and make a call to someone in America – perhaps someone in Chelsea.

It’s something that Corral said belies the entire situation – the globalization of everything, including people.

“There are a lot of questions about why there are so many more now, but in a lot of aspects we’re more global in many ways,” he said. “We see the free flow of trade and now we also see the free flow of people and workers. The law is always the last thing to catch up to how the world is working. These kids have cell phones and are in constant communication. It’s a smaller world and people can traverse expanses of land we thought was impossible just 10 or 15 years ago. They want something better for themselves. In many ways, they’re taking a gamble to leave a situation and try to make a change to better their lives. We can all relate to doing such things in our teens and 20s. That’s who we’re seeing come here. The ones we don’t see are those who accepted their lot in life and stayed behind.”

For those who did take off on that adventure, Marrero said determination is an absolute. She’s convinced that any young person here illegally, if given a chance, will succeed.

“I was working with a 17-year-old girl who had nothing and knew nobody, but you could tell she was going to be somebody,” said Marrero. “There’s a determination in here and in all of them, and then at the same time she contains these layers of sadness because of all the things she’s fought against. Despite that deep sadness, you look in their eyes and realize that given the chance, they will fight through any adversity to success.”

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Primary Showdown

Primary Showdown

On Tuesday, Sept. 9 incumbent State Representative Dan Ryan, of Charlestown will square off against challenger Roy Avellaneda, of Chelsea, for the Second Suffolk House District, which covers Charlestown and Chelsea.

This week the Independent Newspaper Group submitted a questionaire to both candidates on some of the major issues facing the neighborhood.

Here are their responses:

Chelsea Record (CR): Immigration issues are pretty much front and center in Chelsea and have been for a long time. However, the recent surge of immigrants over the last year from Central American countries – via the southern U.S. border – has posed quite a challenge to Chelsea schools and resources. As state representative, what do you believe you can do to assist with this new situation on the streets and in the schools, and should Chelsea have to bear this entire burden?Rep. Dan Ryan

Rep. Dan Ryan (DR): Our national politics have failed us on the immigration issue. Until they get their act together down in Washington the task of taking care of these children falls on us. The state must find the resources to reimburse our cities and towns for these added expenses. We also have to find a way to get the Feds to pay for it. I didn’t fully understand the extent of how many children were coming into the U.S. and making their way to our neighborhoods until the processing piece brought it to a head.

My federal experience gave me a better understanding, at least from a policy level, of the request by the President to possibly process unaccompanied children in Massachusetts. I knew it would be a polarizing issue. I addressed it with my heart as much as my intellect. When I got the notice that the Governor was holding a press conference I made sure to be there. Looking back, I believe I may have been one of the only legislators in the room. I’ve learned from one of the best to take tough issues head on. I went to my desk and posted to Facebook my support for the Governor’s decision and the info sheets should anyone have questions. You can still read the responses. I know I probably lost some votes that day but if I turned one heart it was worth it.

My experience puts me in a great position to bring federal stakeholders into the conversation. They seemed to be an uninvited missing piece to the community meetings I went to since being elected.

CR: For more than a decade, there has been a push to give illegal immigrants in the state legal driver’s licenses. There are legitimate arguments on both sides of the issue. Now, it appears that the issue will surface again in the near future. What is your stance on allowing driver’s licenses for people who don’t are not legally documented in the U.S.?

DR: On one occasion during the first campaign I was asked by a reporter about this issue in Charlestown. He was told that I wouldn’t answer that question the same way in Charlestown as I would in Chelsea. I found that odd. Anyway, my response was, “Yes, I do believe they should be eligible for driver’s licenses. I also don’t believe it is an immigration issue. I believe it is a transportation issue and a road safety issue”. I was surprised as a legislator to find out that the bill in question was in the transportation committee. It makes sense when you think about it. I knew the issue well but not the legislative details. My instincts served me well.

My candid response also prompted the reporter to blog that, “Ryan is not afraid to address any issue. He is articulate and as knowledgeable on the issues as any candidate I have seen in the four Suffolk Specials”. I used his line in my literature.

One of the first meetings I had at the State House was with the Police Chiefs from around the state, with Chief Keyes being one of them. I was able to hear some of law enforcements concerns with the bill. I believe there are pieces that can be worked out. My feeling was that many in law enforcement are at least open to discussion going into the next legislative session.

CR: The streets in Chelsea, particularly Broadway and other thoroughfares, are in rough shape. Some areas even have cobblestone showing from generations ago. Money is tight, and the City has gotten to projects when it can. However, there isn’t enough to go around to take care of all the needs in a City where more and more cars travel the streets every year. What can you, as state rep., do to help City’s like Chelsea solve their street repair woes?

DR: The Feds aren’t paying for much these days. When I worked in Washington the one thing both parties could agree to spend money on was roads and bridges. Transportation appropriations were never a bone of contention. Whether you are a big businessman, a small farmer or a soccer mom just about everyone used to agree that you can’t build a bridge or pave a road without the government’s help. This lack of highway and transit money trickles down to municipalities bearing the brunt. We have increased local aid which may help a little.

One thing I caution about is Question 1 on the state ballot this November. The bill pertains to repealing the state gas tax indexed to inflation. In repealed it could cost the State billions in much needed road repair money spent in our cities and towns. My biggest fear is that an uninformed public will go to the voting both in November and feel good about voting against taxes. But, this is a tax that business, labor and every rational thinking person that knows the issue agrees upon. Vote “NO” on Question 1 if you want more money to fix your local streets and bridges.

CR: Chelsea is in dire need of a new middle school, and the Clark Avenue School is currently on the drawing board with state funding approval. However, once the fine print was read, things got a lot more expensive and state funding didn’t cover everything. Now Chelsea is in a predicament with surging costs on the new school. Do you have any ideas about how to ease the pain of this situation from the state level?

DR: I have met with Superintendent Burke and members of the school committee and am well aware of this issue with the funding formula. Senator DiDomedico, Rep Vincent and I can work with the incoming State Treasurer and Governor to help address this funding shortfall or get a legislative fix if need be.

CR: Casinos are on the horizon in Chelsea. No matter who gets the license, Chelsea is going to be a surrounding community. Also looming on the horizon is a November vote to repeal casino gaming altogether. Do you support the repeal, and if so, why? If not, what project do you prefer and why?

DR: As a State Representative, I find that it my responsibility to make sure my district is protected regardless of where a casino is located. I will work with whatever company is awarded a gaming license. According to the gaming law, municipalities negotiate the surrounding community agreements not the legislature. This entire process has got people’s logic warped. I’m not allowed to advocate a for a state contract to go to one software company over another or one paving company over another because they offered money to my constituency. Why is this different? It is a lot easier for a candidate to make noise. I am now an elected official and will continue to act like one on all state contracts. I spent the Kentucky Derby in Charlestown with a room full of constituents not as a guest of a casino applicant, like my opponent.

I will also add that my position is one of consistency. I was not against gaming before a site was proposed a mile from the house where I am raising my three children. So, I am not against gaming now. I didn’t wait until the day after a host community vote to declare my position. My position has been the same from the beginning. That position is: “if done correctly, I believe the Boston area can benefit from a luxury gaming resort”. In fact, other than those people who were against all gaming in Massachusetts from the beginning, a position I respect, I truly believe my position has been and will continue to be the most consistent in the State. I have not wavered or switched my opinion. I want the roads and bridges in Charlestown and Chelsea fixed regardless if there is a casino or not or where it is located.

CR: Chelsea has miles of waterfront, but during most of its recent history – and still today – that waterfront has been locked away from residents. Many young people don’t even know they live in a waterfront community. Certain projects like the PORT Park have changed that, but there is still a lot of area – some state-owned properties – that make the water inaccessible. What can you, as a state rep., do to help make the City’s waterfront more accessible?

DR: Repurposing old industrial waterfront property is an issue being looked at throughout the coast of the Bay State. I believe we need to find a way to make mixed use residential and commercial spaces compatible with Marine Industry, which is still a vital piece of our state’s economy. Parks such as Port Park and Piers Park in East Boston serve as nice buffers and allow access for recreation. Artists’ communities also seem to work as buffers from heavy marine industry. Right now the restrictions on re-zoning are far too cumbersome and do not allow for adequate master-planning. For us to fully utilize our coastline we have to look to streamline state and federal zoning so that we are not revitalizing one parcel at a time. I have also proposed a Mystic River Water Shuttle in some of my discussions. We need to connect workers and shoppers to the jobs and goods at Assembly Row and the office buildings in Charlestown. This is a natural commute.

Chelsea Record (CR): Immigration issues are pretty much front and center in Chelsea and have been for a long time. However, the recent surge of immigrants over the last year from Central American countries – via the southern U.S. border – has posed quite a challenge to Chelsea schools and resources. As state representative, what do you believe you can do to assist with this new situation on the streets and in the schools, and should Chelsea have to bear this entire burden?

Roy Avellaneda(RA): As a result of the recent surge of migrant children, Chelsea is experiencing a strain in its municipal budget. The strain would have been greater had it not been for the great collaboration of community resources. However, Chelsea deserves and should receive more state and federal aid in response to a situation far outside its control. As State Representative I would advocate for that state aid and reach out to federal officials for the same.

CR: For more than a decade, there has been a push to give illegal immigrants in the state legal driver’s licenses. There are legitimate arguments on both sides of the issue. Now, it appears that the issue will surface again in the near future. What is your stance on allowing driver’s licenses for people who don’t are not legally documented in the U.S.?

RA: We have not seen Immigration Reform at the Federal Level since Ronald Reagan was in office. In the meanwhile, states have had to find ways to deal with immigration issues for themselves. I support the licensing of undocumented residents. I believe it to be a public safety issue. I prefer to have the public and law authorities know of all who are living here and driving on our roads and that all drivers are trained and insured.

CR: The streets in Chelsea, particularly Broadway and other thoroughfares, are in rough shape. Some areas even have cobblestone showing from generations ago. Money is tight, and the City has gotten to projects when it can. However, there isn’t enough to go around to take care of all the needs in a City where more and more cars travel the streets every year. What can you, as state rep., do to help cities like Chelsea solve their street repair woes?

RA: As State Representative, I can advocate for increased authorization of Chapter 90 funding for Chelsea to maintain, repair and improve its roads. Ch. 90 is a 100% reimbursable and essential source of funding so that main thoroughfares such as Broadway can be repaired in a more timely fashion.

CR: Chelsea is in dire need of a new middle school, and the Clark Avenue School is currently on the drawing board with state funding approval. However, once the fine print was read, things got a lot more expensive and state funding didn’t cover everything. Now Chelsea is in a predicament with surging costs on the new school. Do you have any ideas about how to ease the pain of this situation from the state level?

RA: The Legislative intent of the School Building Reinbursement Fund was for municipalities to receive 80% funding. As State representative I would review the situation and application for reimbursement first with city officials and later with members from the Mass School Building Authority. It is these in discussions that I would try to mitigate the differences and attempt to include costs that were not originally covered in the application. Additionally, I would seek clarification so that this does not occur to any other applicant in the future.

CR: Casinos are on the horizon in Chelsea. No matter who gets the license, Chelsea is going to be a surrounding community. Also looming on the horizon is a November vote to repeal casino gaming altogether. Do you support the repeal, and if so, why? If not, what project do you prefer and why?

RA: I have said that the repeal is a half hearted effort to limit gambling. We would still have the lottery, scratch tickets, horse racing and bingo with a two full resort casinos an hour away. I therefore do not support half hearted measures and will vote no on the Casino Repeal question.

Without a doubt the upcoming decision of the Mass Gaming Commission on which of the two casino proposals, Wynn Casino in Everett or Mohegan Sun in Revere, is the most pressing issue facing Charlestown and Chelsea right now. I support the Chelsea City Council and have advocated to the Mass Gaming Commission that the Mohegan Sun proposal be approved. The Mohegan Sun proposal offers greater dollar mitigation packages to Chelsea and other surrounding communities. It also has less impact overall to traffic due to its two onsite Blue line stations, ample onsite parking and higher dollar amount spent on traffic redesign along Rt 1A and Rt 16.

CR: Chelsea has miles of waterfront, but during most of its recent history – and still today – that waterfront has been locked away from residents. Many young people don’t even know they live in a waterfront community. Certain projects like the PORT Park have changed that, but there is still a lot of area – some state-owned properties – that make the water inaccessible. What can you, as a state rep., do to help make the City’s waterfront more accessible?

RA: I have seen legislation passed that allowed other areas of the Boston Harbor be de-designated as Port zoning. This legislation allowed waterfront areas to be used for non-industrial water dependent uses. As State Representative, I would sponsor and advocate for similar language in waterfront areas of Chelsea if it was supported by a City Council Home Rule Petition or a Master Plan.

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School Supplies, Other Needs Lost in the Shuffle of Market Basket Turmoil

School Supplies, Other Needs Lost in the Shuffle of Market Basket Turmoil

Anyone who – over the years – has shopped or who knows workers at the Chelsea Market Basket knows that many families and young people who work there depend on their paycheck to buy the necessities of life.

Until recently, Market Basket jobs have been dependable, well-paid and dignified.

Now, though, paychecks have been slashed and the necessities of life have chugged on.

One of those necessities that is coming full speed at the workers – many of whom are now only part-time or who have had their hours cut completely – is the need for school supplies and back to school gear.

As the Market Basket company continues to be roiled in turmoil and inaction, the lives of the employees and their families haven’t stopped, and through the efforts of two Chelsea sisters, the unmet need for school supplies may have been met – and then some.

The heavy media coverage of the Market Basket situation has focused on Board member allegiances, business strategies and the unwavering support for former CEO Arthur T. Demoulas.

It has honed in on rallies and hordes of employees calling for a return to the old arrangement.

However, not many TV cameras have followed those same faces home where their paychecks no longer arrive in their bank accounts and their families have not stopped needing things like school supplies.

Janatha Gonzalez and her sister, Tracy DeJesus, have been front and center at most of the rallies -and even though they don’t work at Market Basket – they have supported their friends and neighbors from Chelsea at the huge rallies.

Earlier this month, though, they saw the trouble on those faces. It was a trouble that spoke of full-time work reduced to part-time work or even no work. It was a trouble that, at the same time, showed the coming of the school year and no means to prepare their children.

“I think everybody is so focused on getting Market Basket back together, but they people don’t see so much that these are families with one child or three children,” said Janatha. “Anyone not knowing what they’re job is going to be one week after another is going to face some difficulties. These families depended on their Market Basket jobs to pay for things like school supplies. Now they only have part-time work or they’re being given no hours at all. Even the students that work part-time to save money for college or to pay for their school supplies – this has ended their part time jobs. These are people here in Chelsea who depend on jobs that are not so dependable right now.”

With that in mind, the two sisters jumped on an idea promoted by a Facebook page calling for help with school supplies for Market Basket workers.

Both reached out to the Market Basket, asking if they could put a homemade box asking for school supply donations. While the store managers were a little hesitant at first, they did consent to the idea.

Other donation boxes were placed at the Chelsea Collaborative and at Tito’s Bakery on Broadway.

The end result has been a cornucopia of pencils, notebooks, protractors and compasses.

“The turnout has been amazing,” said Janatha. “I’ve been able to fill up 75 backpacks. We’ve been stuffing backpacks every day with so many supplies while we sit in our kitchen. It’s been encouraging to see the local businesses in Chelsea and Charlestown donate, as well as the individuals who have flocked to support the workers. It seems like as soon as we empty the donation box, we get another call from the managers at the store telling us the bin is full again.”

In addition to the backpacks, they have also assembled binders with more dedicated supplies like calculators and compasses. Those supplies will go to the high school students who depend on their Market Basket jobs to pay for their supplies.

“So many of these high school kids pay for back to school by working at the store, and now those jobs aren’t there,” said Janatha.

Donations will be taken through the end this Friday, and the backpacks and binders will be handed out to the part-time Market Basket workers at the Chelsea store from noon to 2 p.m. this Sunday, Aug. 24.

“We are really excited and are really looking forward to getting these much-needed supplies in the hands of the workers this Sunday,” said Janatha.

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