Time Rolls On : Bellingham Square Clock Is Repaired

The historic clock in Bellingham Square is right on time.

Thanks to the efforts of the world-renowned Chelsea Clock Company, the clock has been repaired and is now showing the correct time for all 1,440 minutes of each day.

“The clock is fixed – I’m very happy,” proudly reported master horologest Bhupat Patel of Chelsea Clock. “We’re going to come back again to put the new lenses on the glass. The city is going to remove all the rust and repaint the clock.”

Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson was on hand for the relaunching of the clock.

“They did an outstanding job,” said Robinson. “Tom [Ambrosino] had reached out to me to get in touch with Chelsea Clock to fix the clock.”

Robinson is the brother-in-law of long-time Chelsea Clock official D. Bruce Mauch.

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Obituaries 06-13-2019

Santo Agri

US Army veteran of World War II

Santo A. “Sam” Agri passed away Thursday morning, June 6 at

the Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home surrounded by his loving family. He was 95 years old. Born in East Boston, the son of the late Giuseppe and Josephine (Astorino) Agri, Sam grew up in Revere and attended Revere public schools. He enlisted in the US Army on July 26, 1943 and served almost a year and a half overseas, including Western Germany, Rome and Southern France. Corporal Agri was honorably discharged on December 12, 1946, receiving the European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

Upon returning home from the service, Sam opened an aluminum siding business with his brother. He owned the business for many years before he began working at the Naval Ship Yard in Charlestown. As a carpenter by trade, Sam worked on the USS Constitution while employed at the Naval Ship Yard.

Sam and his beloved wife of 68 years, the late Theresa R. (Bellino) Agri, were long time Chelsea residents.

Sam and his wife had a passion for dancing. They would travel all over to dance. A few of their favorite spots included the Chelsea Polish Club, Polcari’s, and the Cathay Pacific Restaurant in Quincy.

Sam adored his large family and loved spending time with all of his grandchildren and great grandchildren. He will be greatly missed by all his family.

Sam was the devoted father of Joseph M. Agri of Florida, Janice J. Christoforo and her husband, John of Holbrook, Joan Ramage and her husband, Joseph of Avon and Joyce Agri and her husband, Stephen Thomas of Malden. Sam was pre-deceased by 13 brothers and sisters. He is also lovingly survived by six grandchildren: John and Matthew Christoforo, Dominic and Andrea Taverna and Eddie and Theresa Klosiewicz and four great grandchildren, Julia, Nicholas, Jimmy and Thomas Christoforo.

Sam’s Funeral Mass was celebrated on Saturday, June 8 at Our Lady of Grace Church in Chelsea. Interment with Military Honors concluded the service at Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett. Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the Carafa Family Funeral Home in Chelsea.

Luis Garcia Maldonado

Nov. 30, 1958 – June 8, 2019

Luis Garcia Maldonado passed away Saturday morning, June 8 at the Whidden Memorial Hospital in Everett after a brief illness.

He was born in Progreso, Yoro, Honduras into the family of the late Amelia Maldonado-Perez and Luis García-Robles. He received his formal education in Honduras. He married Lelis Carcamo and, with his young family, came to the United States, settled in Chelsea and for a brief time moved to Texas before returning to Chelsea some 25 years ago.

Luis supported his family working as a marina laborer. He was employed for many years in the shipyard of Boston Towing and Transportation, maintaining their fleet of tugboats and barges. A hard worker and devoted family man, in his spare time Luis enjoyed home gardening, time with family and friends, cooking, socializing and traveling to Honduras to visit with family.

He is survived by his beloved wife, Lelis Carcamo and was the devoted father of Gina Flores and her husband, Jose of Lynn, Karla Carcamo and Leslie García, both of Chelsea and Heidy García of Progreso-Yoro, Honduras. He was the cherished grandfather of Evelin Esteban, Cindi Flores, Laura Flores, Elizabeth Alacaron and Joshua Alacaron; dear brother of Carminda García-Maldonado, Elvia García-Maldonado, Mercedes García-Maldonado, Humberto García-Maldonado, Paulino García-Maldonado and Famelisia García-Maldonado. He is also survived by many great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, extended family members and friends.

Family and friends are invited to visit at the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea today, Thursday, June 13 from 3 to 8 p.m. His funeral will begin from the Welsh Funeral home on Friday, June 14 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Rose Church, 600 Broadway Chelsea at 10 a.m. Services will conclude with interment, location to be announced. Funeral home fully handicap accessible, ample parking opposite funeral home.

Daniel Mikolajewski

Decorated veteran and GE retiree

Daniel Mikolajewski of Chelsea died on May 11.

Danny was born in December of 1946, the youngest of four children and was a lifelong resident of Chelsea. Raised on Beacon Street, he spent his youth at St. Stanislaus School. He attended Everett Vocational for printing and worked odd jobs during and after high school until he enlisted in the United States Army in September of 1966 and was stationed in Vietnam during the war. It was during those three years of service that he fought for the peace of others and the safety of his comrades. Within the three years of being in Vietnam fighting the battle, it was because of his courage, dedication and bravery that Danny was awarded The National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal , 3 Bronze Stars for Meritorious Achievement, The Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal and The Combat Infantryman Badge.

In 1969, he was honorably discharged and off to start a new chapter in his life. It was at this time he met his beloved friend of 50 years and wife of 48 years, Betty.

Danny worked for Lawson Machinery and Tool for some time until he secured a job as a helicopter engine tester for General Electric in Lynn, where he worked for 37 years until his retirement.

Danny was a former longtime member of the Polish Falcons of Chelsea and attended Patriots games as a season ticket holder before they started to win. He was an avid bowler on multiple teams at Townline in Malden and, in his remaining years, he spent time as a member and avid cribbage player at the Polish Political Club of Chelsea.

He was the beloved husband of Elizabeth “Betty” (Gubski) Mikolajewski, devoted father of Kristin Beth (Mikolajewski) Breen and her husband, Joseph of Quincy and Daniel Mikolajewski, Jr. and his wife, Siobhan of Norwood; brother of Geraldine Douglas and her husband, Arthur of Lynnfield and the late Edward Miles and his surviving wife, Joyce Miles of Wilmington and Wallace Miles; brother-in law of Sr. Barbara Ann Gubski, SND of Chelsea; cherished grandfather of Madeline Adele Breen, Evelyn Claire Breen and Fiona-Maggie Mikolajewski.

In 1976 Danny became a father, first came the birth of their daughter Kristin Beth and six years later in 1982 son Daniel Jr was born. Both of which he was very proud. He became a father once again with the addition of his son-in-law, Joe and daughter-in-law, Siobhan to the family. But the most recent of happy times in his life for the past eight years was his three beautiful grandchildren, Maddie, Evie and Fiona-Maggie. Never a time went by when he didn’t crack a smile or belt a laugh because they brought him pure joy in that moment of time.

Danny’s lengthy illness with cancer called him home on May 11, 2019. He passed with the one true constant in his life of 50 years by his side his best friend and beloved wife.

A Celebration of Life was held on Sunday, June 2 in the Smith Funeral Home, 125 Washington Avenue, Chelsea. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial contributions be made to the Leonard Florence Center for the Living, 165 Captains Row, Chelsea, MA 02150 or to the American Cancer Society, 3 Speen St., Suite 250, Framingham, MA 01701 or to Exceptional Citizens Week at Camp Fatima atwww.ecweek.org/donate.

Sonya Cannon

Of Everett, formerly of Chelsea

Sonya J. (Senna) Cannon of Everett, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 6.

She was the beloved wife of the late Thomas., mother of Ronald M. and his wife, Jodi A. of Pelham, NH, sister of Ronald F. Senna of Everett and is also survived by two grandchildren, Mackenzie M. and Thomas J., one niece, Suzanne Senna, and one nephew, Sean Senna.

Funeral arrangements were by the Salvatore Rocco & Sons Funeral Home, 331 Main St., Everett. Interment was in the Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For more information: 1-877-71-ROCCO or roccofuneralhomes.com

James Lanzillo

Member of Chelsea Knights of Columbus

James A. Lanzillo, of Revere, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 4.

During his working years, he was employed as a supervisor of maintenance for an apartment complex. A member of the Chelsea Knights of Columbus # 83 and was active in the Explorer Post # 109. A lover of Revere Beach, he especially enjoyed flying kites there.

He was the devoted son of the late Richard and Ruth (Perry) Lanzillo, longtime companion of the late Tara Tormay, beloved brother of Richard Lanzillo of Florida, Robert Lanzillo and his wife, Cathy of Saugus, Paul Lanzillo and his wife, Debbie of Saugus and Denise Domelowicz of Peabody. He is also lovingly survived by many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews as well as his canine companions, Lucy, Rocco and Cassie.

At his request, all services will be private.

To leave a message of condolence for Jim’s family, please visit www.smithfuneralhomes.com

Giuseppe Colucciello

Of North Reading, formerly of Chelsea

Giuseppe Colucciello of North Reading, formerly of Chelsea, died on June 8.

He was the beloved husband of the late Assunta (Savignano), cherished father of Luigi Colucciello and his wife, Kathleen of Chelsea, dear brother of Michelina, Juigi and Angelo, all of Italy and the late Camille and Carmela and adoring grandfather of Tia and Nicholas.

His funeral will be from the Paul Buonfiglio & Sons-Bruno Funeral Home, 128 Revere St, Revere on Friday, June 14 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Anthony’s Church at 10 a.m. Relatives and friends are kindly invited. A visitation will be held today, Thursday, June 13 from 4 to 8 p.m. Interment will be at Woodlawn Cemetery. For guest book, please visit www.Buonfiglio.com

Carmen Jimenez

Caring and loving person who will be remembered for her keen wit and sense of humor

Carmen Jimenez passed away early Tuesday morning in the peaceful surroundings of Chelsea home after battling cancer over the past few years. She was 47 years old.

Born and raised in Olancho, Honduras, she was one of nine children born to the late Juan Jimenez and Angela Herrera. She came to Chelsea as a young lady bearing and raising her own three children here. Carmen worked in the produce department at Demoulas in Wilmington for past 20 years.

Carmen enjoyed playing bingo, music and dancing and she will forever be remembered for her keen wit and sense

of humor, always the loving and caring person who loved entertaining family and friends.

To mourn her passing and cherish her memory, she leaves her beloved children: Mislean Zelaya of Revere, Michelle Cruz and Angel Zelaya, both of Chelsea, her sister and housemate, Gladys Herrera. She was the cherished grandmother of Emanuel, Franklin, Liam and Skyla Zelaya.

Relatives and friends are most kindly invited to attend visiting hours at the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea on Friday, June 14 from 4 to 8 p.m. The funeral home is fully handicap accessible, ample parking opposite funeral home.

Her burial be held later next week in Honduras at the Central Cemetery in Armis, Olancho. For directions or to send expressions of sympathy, please visit: www.WelshFuneralHome.com

Anthony Memorial – Frank A. Welsh & Sons, Chelsea, 617-889-2723

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The Curse of Social Media and the Internet

In the aftermath of the terrible coordinated attacks by suicide bombers on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka that killed more than 300 people and wounded about 500 in churches and hotels across the small nation, the Sri Lankan government took the extraordinary step of shutting down social media platforms, including Facebook, You Tube, and Twitter, in order to prevent the dissemination of misinformation that might incite even more bloodshed among its various sectarian groups.

This decade has seen the spread of social media that rightly might be compared to an out-of-control wildfire. What initially was seen as an innocuous manner of sharing information among friend groups — think of friends sitting around a camp fire telling stories — has turned into a raging inferno whipped by the winds of greed and hatred that is destroying everything in its path.

Say what you want about the recently released Mueller Report, what is beyond dispute is that it shows that the Russian government used social media through coordinated bot attacks to spread misinformation among large swaths of the American public who utilize these forms of media. In short, the Russians are using social media to undermine our democracy.

The attacker in New Zealand who committed the atrocities in two mosques drew his inspiration from social media postings by right-wing organizations and individuals from around the world and then posted his carnage live online. It was hours before the social media companies were able to take down what he posted, but by then the damage had been done and his carnage had been viewed around the globe.

In some respects, these abuses of online platforms by those who wish to spread fear and disinformation are just the tip of the iceberg of the curse that has become the Internet.

There is no such thing as privacy for anybody, unless you live under the proverbial rock. Everything we do on-line is tracked and establishes a profile that can be used — and misused — by those who are keeping track.

The Chinese government is showing firsthand how the Internet can be wielded by a malevolent government (and non-government actors) to control both unfavored opposition groups and individuals.

The Chinese are employing facial recognition software to identify every person in their country — a monumental task in a nation of a billion or so people — but it already is being used to keep track of, and suppress, minority religious groups.

The Chinese government also is issuing a “score” for every person in the country — think of it as a credit score, but taken to the nth degree — that ultimately will rank every person in the country on a scale of social and economic acceptability, creating a hierarchy that will determine a person’s lifelong fate.

It also is clear that the internet has become the new battlefield among nations and others. Who needs nuclear weapons when a hostile government or terrorist organization or criminal enterprise can disable a nation’s energy grid or wreak havoc on the financial system or hold individuals and businesses hostage simply by employing malevolent software?

America’s military might — our trillions of dollars worth of aircraft carriers, stealth bombers, and drones — is no match for a computer virus or worm that attacks our nation’s infrastructure.

George Orwell, in his novel “1984,” describes a dystopian future in which the government, symbolized by Big Brother, scrutinizes every human action with the aim of creating conformity among its citizens.

Orwell wrote his novel in 1948. It is ironic — and incredibly prescient of Orwell — that the internet as we know it today was beginning to take shape in 1984.

It is clear in 2019 that the world Orwell predicted in 1984 has arrived — and we fear that things are going to get a lot worse before we figure out how to get this Frankenstein monster under control, if we ever do.

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Appreciation – Remembering Trina Wilkerson

Appreciation –  Remembering Trina  Wilkerson

Hundreds of friends, family, former high school classmates, and co-workers paid their respects to Trina Louise Wilkerson during memorial observances at the Emmanuel Baptist Church in Malden.

Trina passed away unexpectedly on March 6. She was 45 years old.

Reggie Wilkerson, her older brother and one of Chelsea High’s greatest quarterbacks, said he appreciated the many people who came out to pay tribute to his sister’s beautiful life.

Trina was a lifelong supporter of Reggie’s and the caretaker of the well-known Wilkerson family.

“Trina was a great little sister, the best,” said Reggie. “She was always there for me. She took care of our family, and that was so important. She took so much care of everybody in our family.”

Reggie and Trina participated in Chelsea Pop Warner together, he as a football player, she as a cheerleader.

Trina was an amazing party organizer and loved being around people. She uplifted others with her smile and kind words.

When Irena Wilkerson, Reggie and Trina’s beloved mother, passed away, Trina decided to organize a party to honor her and donate the proceeds to the American Cancer Society. Reggie helped out, to be sure, but Trina was the planner who took care of the details to insure the success of the event, making sure that everyone had a good time.

Reggie said he will carry on with the fifth annual fundraiser – in memory of Irena Wilkerson and Trina Wilkerson – and host the benefit this Saturday, March 30, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Merritt Club.

Paying their respects

One of the many friends who turned out for the tribute to Trina Wilkerson was Phunk Phenomenon Dance Studio owner Reia Briggs Connor.

“Reia was one of my sister’s best friends,” said Reggie. “Reia, my sister, and I used to take dance lessons together at Genevieve’s. I was a dancer, too. We used to wear our little costumes.”

City Councillors Leo Robinson and Calvin Brown joined other local dignitaries in paying their respects to Trina.

“Just a great young lady,” said Calvin Brown. “I’m so fortunate to having gotten to know Trina and her beautiful family. We have lost a great person, someone who loved Chelsea and gave back to her community.”

Also turning out for the memorial observances in Malden were Trina’s co-workers at Hyde Park Community Center.

“My sister was a youth counselor in Boston, so there were a lot of youths whom my sister mentored during their childhood – they spoke at the services,” said Reggie. “It was very touching to hear their stories and how much they loved my sister and what she did to help them succeed in their lives. I was like, ‘wow, for real?’

Reggie said during the observances a gentleman approached him and said, “Your sister (Trina) helped my daughter so much. She suffered from low self-esteem, her confidence level was low and she didn’t believe in her artwork. He said to me, ‘your sister mentored her and she raised her confidence level and she got my daughter to believe in her work.

“And Reggie, I want to tell you that because of Trina, my daughter was accepted to the school of her choice – and we owe this all to your sister.”

Heartwarming stories like that about Trina – a 2017 recipient of the CBC’s prestigious Chelsea Trailblazer Award – have helped Reggie and the family during this difficult time.

“Trina did so much for kids and the community in general,” said Reggie proudly. “I want to carry on her legacy of caring and kindness and her generosity of spirit.”

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Appreciation:Remembering Frankie Bernard, Who Had a Gift for Art and a Gusto for Life

Appreciation:Remembering Frankie Bernard, Who Had a Gift for Art and a Gusto for Life

Frankie Bernard was an inspiration to all, a man who never let his physical challenges deter him from his pursuits in

Frankie Bernard was a noted newspaper cartoonist and caricaturist whose artwork was enjoyed by many people.

life. With the support of a loving family and friends who enjoyed being in his presence, Frankie lived each day to its fullest.

Born with Spina Bifida, Frankie graduated from Chelsea High School in 1986 and attended the Massachusetts College of Art. He became an accomplished cartoonist and caricaturist, delighting readers on the pages of the Chelsea Record and its sister publications with his creativity and keen sense of humor.

He brought joy to visitors to Faneuil Hall Marketplace with his caricatures and taught others the craft of art and to appreciate it while serving as an instructor at Bunker Hill College and in school programs in Chelsea. Through social media, he developed friendships with other artists all over the country.

Francis J. ‘Frankie’ Bernard Jr., son of Mary L. (Manning) Bernard and the late Francis J. Bernard Sr., died on Dec. 18 after a brief illness. Frankie was 51.

“The most important thing I would want people to know is how strong he was, what he endured, and he just took it with a grain of salt,” said his sister, Maureen Bernard Jurgelewicz. “The hospitalizations, the procedures, and the tests, things most people couldn’t endure, Frankie met them head on as a fact of life.

“Interestingly enough, they told my mother that Frankie would live to be about 2 years old, so he defied that by a lot,” said Maureen. “He surprised the doctors with surviving and flourishing.”

And he did flourish, demonstrating an early gift of proficiency in art and caricatures. “That came out pretty much when he was a toddler – he was able to draw and he could pick up any song and play it on the keyboards, even though he never had lessons,” said Maureen. “You could see he had that gift at a young age. He was very artistic.”

Maureen recalled how Frankie would engage in recreational activities with the other children on Gardner Street and in the neighborhood, participating regularly in games like kickball and kick the can.

“He would try to keep up with us and he could,” said Maureen.

She describes her mother, Mary Bernard, as “an angel,” who devoted her whole life to Frankie with her care, her uplifting manner, and her kindness.

“Frankie and I had a good relationship, sometimes I was like a second mom to him, though he didn’t always like that too much,” said Maureen. “We did a lot together,  the past two years especially.”

Maureen said her brother loved Chelsea. “I tried to get him to move closer to me, but he wouldn’t budge – he loved everything about Chelsea. He loved his Chelsea friends.”

Sean Richards was one of Frankie’s closest friends, according to Maureen.

It was Maureen who wrote the beautiful eulogy that was delivered by Frankie’s nephew, Michael Bernard Jr., at the funeral Mass Dec. 22 at Our Lady of Grace Church.

Following is the eulogy:

Eulogy for Frankie

Love can cure your problems/You’re so lucky I’m around/Let my love open the door.

These are the lyrics to one of Frankie’s favorite songs from one of his favorite bands. They seem so fitting today as we pay tribute to our beloved friend, uncle, brother and son Frankie.

We love your strength and hope Frankie. Your Chelsea-strong fighting spirit. You showed us that strength means never giving up in the face of another hospital stay, another surgery or another social rejection. Your hope was for a better new day, each day, and that never waivered.

Frankie, we love that God blessed you with the gift of art. You loved to draw your caricatures and cartoons. It was your passion and profession. Other than a big tip or paycheck, you liked nothing more than to make people smile with your caricatures.

We loved your gusto for life. It was there as a kid playing kick-the-can on Gardner and Parker. Always keeping up with the neighborhood kids. It was there for concerts and karaoke as an adult. For attending your beloved Celtics and Red Sox games.  You were always ready, willing and able to pursue a good time.

Frankie we love that you were a great friend. You loved nothing more than spending time with your friends.  From your friends awakening you from hospice care in the ICU to meeting you at the PPC or the Brown Jug, you cherished each and every moment with them.

We love your love for family. As an Uncle, Brother and Son you have taught us so much. You gifted us with the lessons of patience and perseverance. You were a living example of never sweating the small stuff. You and Mom were a living example of dedication and truly unconditional love.  This love was truly the best medicine of all.

We were so lucky you were around.

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Residents Remember the Soldiers’ Home Water Tower, Bittersweet Farewell

Residents Remember the Soldiers’ Home Water Tower, Bittersweet Farewell

It was the talk of the town.

Few in the world of kid-dom could believe it.

But, as School Committeeman Rich Maronski recalled, Scottie Holden did climb the Soldiers’ Home water tower and it was the stuff of legend growing up in Chelsea.

“The biggest news with the tower as a kid was when Scottie Holden actually climbed it,” said Maronski. “It was the talk of the town for more than a week. I grew up beside this tower all my life. It’s the thing I look at when I’m on an airplane. I know when I’m leaving and I know when I’m home by looking at that tower.”

His remembrance was but one of many that were shared at a special farewell to the Soldiers’ Home water tower last Friday, Nov. 30, in the shadow of the tower, which was constructed in 1958 and will come down in the next few weeks. It has to come down to make way for the $199 million Community Living Center that will provide long-term care for veterans in a modern, home-like setting. Currently, the Quigley Hospital provides great care, but it is laid out in open wards, which are no longer acceptable.

“Today is an opportunity to say farewell to the water tower that served as a beacon or a landmark to so many in and around Chelsea,” said state Veterans Secretary Francisco Urena. “This is a bittersweet moment, but this is also a happy moment for the veterans at the Soldiers Home who will reap the benefit of the largest investment ever in the Commonwealth for long-term veterans care. It’s going to be a beacon of care for veterans across the Commonwealth now.”

Supt. Cheryl Poppe said CBI Corp. put up the six-legged water tower in 1958, and the purpose was to help the water supply and water pressure at the home. Over time, however, the tower became less useful and a permanent pump station was implemented in 2011. The tower was decommissioned at that time, but allowed to stay in place. Over time, it has deteriorated and vandals have painted it.

“It was a noticeable part of the Chelsea skyline, but now our Community Living Center will serve as a special vision on the horizon as it will serve our veterans for the decades to come,” she said.

Tom Kasiecki said he has watched the tower all his life.

“I watched this tower go up when I was a kid in 1958,” he said. “I sat there at my window over there and watched them build it. Now, as a senior citizen, I am going to sit over there and watch them demolish it.”

Former City Councillor Matt Frank said he is going to miss the tower, and that it is special to him, but he also said he will choose to remember it now as a place of hope and rest for those who have served their country – as it was for his grandfather when he was there.

“That’s what I’m going to remember moving forward is we’re going to have a brand new facility for the veterans,” he said. “When I look up and see the skyline without the tower, I will be sad. I will miss the tower because I’ve had it there all my life. It’s always been there. However, when I look up and don’t see it, I’m going to think of the wonderful care that the veterans are receiving there.”

Added Barbara Richards, “It’s going to be very hard to see it go. Whether you go by boat, train, plan or car, you can always see the tower.”

Dottie Kusmierek has lived across the street from the tower for most of her life. She said it holds a special place in the hearts of her family members. She said it will be hard to see it go, but she understands the reasoning.

“My older brother was in Vietnam and he saw the water tower when he came back home and said, ‘At last, I’m home,’” she recalled. “There are a lot of changes now in Chelsea, and a lot of them I’m not happy about. Good bye old friend and on with the new.”

Councilor Luis Tejada said he would definitely be sad to see it go, and it’s a part of the local history to him.

“It’s sad to me because New England and Greater Boston have so much history, and it’s why people are jealous of us in other parts of the country,” he said. “The tower was an historical marker for Chelsea. My generation and up recognize that certainly. Sometimes in the name of progress you must give up some things to get others.”

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Council Approves Resolution Supporting Locked Out National Grid Workers

Council Approves Resolution Supporting Locked Out National Grid Workers

The City Council unanimously passed a resolution supporting the locked out National Grid gas workers in a vote of 8-0 on Monday night, adding to the numbers of elected officials now supporting the workers – who have been locked out in a contract dispute for 12 weeks.

Ray Bell of Chelsea – who has lived here for 45 years – came before the Council as one of the locked out workers. He said it’s a matter of public safety, as the replacement workers are not trained or experienced enough to carry out the work they’re doing.

“This is a matter of public safety,” he said. “That’s what it comes down to. This is not a labor issue. The workers trained and experienced need to be in the ground fixing our pipes. This is a no-brainer. It’s putting Chelsea people first…They’ll bury their mistakes. It may not go off now. Maybe it goes off in two months or two years. It could be a disaster. I’m telling you they don’t have experienced and trained people working on these gas pipes.”

Former Councillor Paul Murphy – whose brother is currently locked out – said he doesn’t want to see a disaster either.

“Knowing the work they’re doing on our streets, there could be a disaster here,” he said. “It is a labor dispute, but a different one because they’re locked out. They want to work.”

Councillors were very much in support of the measure despite a miscue last month at a special meeting when the matter didn’t pass due to Councillor Bob Bishop objecting to it. At a special meeting, one objection to a matter can kill it.

On Monday, Bishop said he didn’t oppose the matter, but had concerns last month due to the fact that it conflicted with the charter. Now, he said, the new draft of the resolution was free of any such conflicts.

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Chelsea Unveils John Bruttaniti Memorial Bridge in Ceremony

Chelsea Unveils John Bruttaniti Memorial Bridge in Ceremony

The City of Chelsea dedicated the Washington Avenue bridge at Heard Street in memory of Chelsea Police officer

The Bruttaniti family, standing beneath the John P. Bruttaniti Memorial Bridge sign that is displayed at the structure on Washington Avenue. From left, are Nicole Correa, Karen Bruttaniti, Gemeisha James, Karen Bruttaniti, Festus Odigie, and Gus Correa.

John Bruttaniti during an unveiling ceremony on Wednesday, Aug. 29.

Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson served as master of ceremonies for the program during which City Manager Tom Ambrosino and Council President Damali Vidot and other dignitaries paid tribute to Mr. Bruttaniti, who died in an accident on May 12, 2016 at the age of 41.

Vidot said she personally understood the importance of having a mentor like Mr. Bruttaniti during one’s years of personal development. Other speakers at the ceremony echoed the belief that a bridge dedication was the perfect way to honor a man who was “a bridge” from Chelsea’s dedicated public servants in the Police Department to the city’s youth.

Several of Mr. Bruttaniti’s colleagues in the Police Department and the Fire Department attended the ceremony. (Mr. Bruttaniti worked for three years in the CFD before joining the Police Department in 2008). The Fire and Police Color Guards added an impressive touch to the program. Mr. Bruttaniti’s fellow veterans in the U.S. Army, who served with him in Iraq, were also in attendance for the tribute.

Police Chief Brian Kyes praised Mr. Bruttaniti’s outstanding record as a police officer and read the police report that Mr. Bruttaniti wrote after saving a toddler from choking by dislodging a penny stuck in her throat and resuscitating her. For his heroic actions in that June, 2015 incident, Mr. Bruttaniti received the Chelsea Police Life Saving Award.

Mr. Bruttaniti’s instantaneous response to the situation and his training in the emergency medical field caused some to say that he was placed as “an angel” in that situation to save a baby’s life.

Mr. Bruttaniti’s sister, Karen, delivered touching remarks on behalf of the family.

“John lived with a real zest for life,” said Karen Bruttaniti. “He loved riding his motorcycle and truly enjoying his life. John was a man of deep character. He never judged, never held a grudge, and always believed in forgiving others, no matter what.”

Karen recalled the warm and inspiring correspondences she received while her brother was serving in Iraq. “The letters always ended, saying, ‘Sister, I love my family.”

“I still read his letters and my eyes still fill with tears,” she said.

Karen added thoughtfully, “But let me be clear. John was dedicated to his entire family, and he counted all of you, the people of Chelsea, as family. Serving for and with the people of Chelsea, John loved being a firefighter, police officer, investigator, mentor, volunteering anywhere and in an any way to help his Chelsea family. That was our brother.”

Karen said her brother would have been humbled by having a bridge named in his honor.

“I know he would hope that his memory would serve as an example of community and service to one another in love,” she said.

The souvenir program included photos of Mr. Bruttaniti with Chief Brian Kyes, Capt. David Batchelor, and Sgt. David Flibotte in their CPD uniforms at an awards ceremony in Boston, and of Mr. Bruttaniti with youths he had mentored in the Chelsea REACH Program, and it aptly concluded with the following memorial tribute to the beloved police officer: “John will forever be remembered for his kindness, bravery, and service to our country and to the City of Chelsea.”

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The Movement Kicks off Third Year of Low-Key, Summer Hoops

The Movement Kicks off Third Year of Low-Key, Summer Hoops

Historically, there’s been very little to do on a summer night in Chelsea, and that’s been the problem.

Now, in its third summer, The Movement has been the cure to hapless wandering for local youth.

Instead, they hoop it up.

Coordinated by Councilors Yamir Rodriguez and Damali Vidot, along with Isidra Quinonez and Danny Mojica, The Movement keeps Chelsea kids age 13-20 busy on Wednesday nights and Saturday mornings.

“I think it’s just a great environment because a lot of the younger kids play with the older kids and they can see them on the street outside of the league and say ‘hi,’” said Rodriguez. “A lot of friendships start because of The Movement. It develops kind of a mentor situation because a lot of these kids don’t have an older brother and this helps that too. It’s kind of an unintended consequence, but it’s one of the best things about it.

“The kids love hanging out and playing ball,” he continued.

Vidot said it helps to bring youth together in a relaxed, but supervised, environment.

“On Saturday morning, they don’t hand out, but they come to play,” she said. “After playing all day long, they will not want to go out to the streets when they get home. They’ll stay in and take it easy. On Friday night, they don’t want to stay out because they have to be here on Saturday morning. You have the 13-year-old playing with the 20-year-old, so it helps them become better players. It also builds community. It’s not like a lot of other youth leagues where you have to sign in and sign out. It’s street ball. They can be themselves.”

The Movement came out of a desperate situation, where the community was reeling in the spring of 2016 after the shooting death of Pablo Villeda during an early morning teen party on Washington Avenue. The shooting also injured numerous other young people, and it showed that the youth who are not “at-risk” needed some activities as well.

That’s when The Movement came together.

Now, the league has several hundred young people playing against one another all summer. Typically, the games are played at Highland Park, but a renovation project there may force them to move to the Williams School.

The Movement will begin play in early July, and it had its annual kick-off at Chelsea High last weekend – with the Battle of the Classes and Police vs. Fire basketball games.

“Basketball is the entertainment,” said Rodriguez, “but it’s the environment that has become very important.”

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Police Briefs 01-04-2018

Police Briefs 01-04-2018

ROBBERY ON BROADWAY

On Dec. 22, at 5:20 p.m., officers responded to 165 Walnut St. for a report of a past armed robbery. Upon officers’ arrival, they made contact with the victim and alleged robbery suspect, standing out front of the building. The victim claims the suspect took $200 from him after he left the ATM at the Chelsea Bank on Broadway. The suspect claims the money was used to buy drugs from him and that the victim complained about the quality of the drugs purchased.

Jose Rivera, 32, of 11 Congress Ave., was charged with unarmed robbery.

REFUSED SERVICE AT BAR

On Dec. 22, at 10:49 p.m., officers were dispatched to the Spanish Falcon Club located at 158 Broadway on the report of a fight outside.

Officers observed security outside speaking to a group of men, two of which appeared intoxicated. As Officers spoke to security, they were informed that the two intoxicated males had been causing a disturbance because security refused them entry due to their state of intoxication.

They were asked to leave several times, but were becoming aggressive towards employees. As officers engaged the men in conversation, it was apparent that the men were upset at having been refused entry and wanted to continue their night of drinking. The two men refused the officers’ orders to leave the area and became loud and boisterous, causing a disturbance. The first male was placed into custody after violently resisting officers in their attempt to place him under arrest. The second male, and brother of the male taken into custody, refused orders to leave, and he also became aggressive and was taken into custody after a struggle.

David Garcia, 24, of 141 Marlborough St., was charged with disorderly conduct.

Kevin Garcia, 21, of Lynn, was charged with disorderly conduct, assault and battery on a police officer and resisting arrest.

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