Chelsea Jewish Lifecare and JGS Lifecare Announce Affiliation

Chelsea Jewish Lifecare and JGS Lifecare Announce Affiliation

Chelsea Jewish Lifecare (CJL), a highly respected leader in senior living with campuses in Chelsea and Peabody, and  JGS Lifecare (JGS) a leading health care system serving seniors and their families in western Massachusetts,

(L-R) Susan Goldsmith, chair of the board JGS Lifecare, Adam Berman, president CJL, and Barry Berman, CEO of CJL.

announced their intention to affiliate.

“Affiliating our two organizations makes a great deal of sense at this time,” said Adam Berman, president of Chelsea Jewish Lifecare. “CJL and JGS share the same mission, philosophy, values and goals. We both strive to provide the highest possible quality of care. For us, this common synergy is the key to a long and successful relationship.”

“Our organizations are similar and like-minded in many regards,” said Susan Goldsmith, chair of the board for JGS Lifecare. “Both are centenarian organizations that have been serving seniors for over 100 years. We are both non-profit, faith-based and founded on Jewish principles while serving people of all faiths. We offer the same spectrum of services, including skilled nursing, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, home health and hospice, assisted living, independent living, and adult day health care. Above all, our commitment to providing the best possible care for our elderly community is the driving force behind both institutions and all we do.”

The relationship between CJL and JGS has developed over recent years. After Chelsea Jewish opened the award-winning  Leonard Florence Center for Living in 2010, the country’s first urban model Green House skilled nursing facility, JGS consulted with CJL in preparation for the construction of its own Green House model. The highly acclaimed Sosin Center for Rehabilitation opened in 2016 on the Longmeadow campus. This affiliation is therefore a natural progression of the developing relationship between the two organizations.  Once consummated, CJL will manage the daily affairs of JGS in accordance with the direction set by the JGS Board of Directors.

“This affiliation is beneficial to both institutions and will ensure our stability and future growth for generations to come,” continued Goldsmith. “It’s no secret that across the health care continuum, it’s become increasingly important for organizations to come together for long-term viability, to learn best practices from each other and to better serve the greater good.”

“We believe this is a terrific opportunity for us to combine our expertise to better serve the growing senior population across the state of Massachusetts,” said Barry Berman, CEO of Chelsea Jewish Lifecare. “Our combined resources and economies of scale will ensure the future growth and enhancement of all of our services.”

Read More

Students Achieve Academic Honors

Students Achieve Academic Honors

CHELSEA RESIDENTS GRADUATE FROM NORTHEAST METRO TECH

School Committee Chairman Deborah Davis and Principal Carla Scuzzarella are pleased to announce the graduation of 292 students from Northeast Metro Tech.

On Friday, June 1, graduates from 15 different vocations were celebrated and received their diplomas during a graduation ceremony at Breakheart Stadium.

Superintendent David DiBarri encouraged students to seek out leadership opportunities as they grow in their professional and personal lives — by pursuing management roles, joining their trade’s union or becoming a coach of their favorite sport.

“The United States is still the greatest country on earth but it is up to you and future generations to ensure that we continue to get better and better,” Superintendent DiBarri said. “Please remember that you will always be a member of the Northeast family. It is our hope that in the years to come that all of you will have some connection to Northeast.”

Graduating students from Chelsea include:

Eduard Ajtum Caal

Juliette Alvarez

Luis Barillas Natareno

Mathias Bermudez Galeano

Samuel Cantor Hernandez

Kimberly Carballo

Kevin Colindres

Katerin Contreras Artica

Jaylene Coreas Carballo

Christian DeJesus Franco

Juleann Diniz Gomes

Victor Erazo

Genesis G. Escalante Rosales

Maryanne Funes Martinez

Roberto Funes Martinez

Victor Galeas

Lindsey Garcia Gallegos

Allan Garza Romero

Sarai Hernandez Martinez

Jacqueline Hernandez

Irania Hoffens

Yorick Jimenez Zelaya

Alexander Lizardo

Jose Lopreto Hernandez

Tyrese Louis

Madeline Martinez Fajardo

Emerson Meda Vasquez

Eduardo Montes

Brian Mullaly

Corey J. O’Neil

Jacqueline Pablo Lopez

Lucy Platero-Martinez

Reynaldo Portillo

Katherine Quintana

Pamela Ramos

Diego O. Rivera-Molina

Adiarys Rojas Hernandez

Diego Roque Romero

Jerry Ruiz Manzano

Brielle Tigges

Devin Toro

Trang T. Tran

Elizabeth Villalobos

Jaycee Yu

Katya Zelaya

Salutatorian Raymond Borden, of Winthrop, spoke in rhymes about his time at Northeast, paying tribute to a fellow salutatorian, Dr. Seuss.

“You’re sad that you’re leaving, it’s a shame you have to go, but no more home work or classwork, how could you say no?” Borden said to his peers. “…You did it, and whether by stumble or stride, you’ll do what you have to to get by. The brain is not for getting A’s and B’s, but for seizing lifetime opportunities. That’s my knowledge I impart to you, and with my final rhyme, I bid thee adieu.”

Class President Rebecca Corbett, of Revere, thanked everyone — from students’ families, to their teachers and staff, to her classmates — for making the last four years at Northeast so successful.

“This is it — this is the beginning of what we want to make our future,” Corbett concluded. “Whether you are going to further your education, or work in your trade, I believe that each and every one of you will do great things and be great people. Keep taking care of each other like family, and as a reminder, this is not goodbye, it’s see you later.”

LOCAL STUDENT WINS AWARD

Lucy Platero-Martinez, from Chelsea and a student at Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational High School won one of the nation’s highest awards at the 2018 SkillsUSA Championships, held in Louisville, Ky., on June 27-28. More than 6,300 students competed at the national showcase of career and technical education. The SkillsUSA Championships is the largest skill competition in the world and covers 1.4 million square feet, equivalent to 20 football fields or 25 acres. 

Students were invited to the event to demonstrate their technical skills, workplace skills and personal skills in 102 hands-on occupational and leadership competitions including robotics, automotive technology, drafting, criminal justice, aviation maintenance and public speaking. Industry leaders from 600 businesses, corporations, trade associations and unions planned and evaluated the contestants against their standards for entry-level workers. Industry support of the SkillsUSA Championships is valued at over $36 million in donated time, equipment, cash and material. More than 1,900 industry judges and technical committee members participated this year.

Skill Point Certificates were awarded in 72 occupational and leadership areas to students who met a predetermined threshold score in their competition, as defined by industry. The Skill Point Certificate is a component of SkillsUSA’s assessment program for career and technical education.

Platero-Martinez was awarded a Skill Point Certificate in Esthetics.

“More than 6,300 students from every state in the nation participated in the 2018 SkillsUSA Championships,” said SkillsUSA executive director Tim Lawrence. “This showcase of career and technical education demonstrates our SkillsUSA partnership at its finest. Our students, instructors and industry partners work together to ensure that every student excels. This program expands learning and career opportunities for our members.”

The SkillsUSA Championships event is held annually for students in middle school, high school or college/postsecondary programs as part of the SkillsUSA National Leadership and Skills Conference. More than 360,000 students and advisors join SkillsUSA annually, organized into more than 18,000 sections and 53 state and territorial associations.

LOCAL STUDENTS GRADUATE FROM MGH INSTITUTE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS IN BOSTON

The following students received a degree from MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston.

* Yovianna García Alvarado, who lives in Chelsea, received a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree.

* Eva Wong Trinh, who lives in Chelsea, received a Doctor of Occupational Therapy degree.

* Joshua Merson, who grew up in Chelsea, received a Master of Science in Health Professions Education degree.

  • Flor Amaya, who grew up in Chelsea, received a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

* Mariolino Fernandes, who grew up in Chelsea , received a Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree.

They were among the 583 students in the Class of 2018 who graduated from the Boston health sciences graduate school in May. The MGH Institute has educated more than 7,700 health care professionals since its 1977 founding.

About MGH Institute of Health Professions 
Team-based care, delivered by clinicians skilled in collaboration and communication, leads to better outcomes for patients and clients. That’s why MGH Institute of Health Professions makes interprofessional learning a cornerstone of all its programs. Approximately 1,600 students at its Charlestown Navy Yard campus in Boston learn and collaborate in teams across disciplines as they pursue post-baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degrees in nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, speech-language pathology, health professions education, and a PhD in rehabilitation sciences. The interprofessional learning module extends to hundreds of hospital, clinical, community, and educational sites throughout Greater Boston and beyond.

The MGH Institute, which has graduated more than 7,700 students since it was founded in 1977, is the only degree-granting affiliate of Partners HealthCare, New England’s largest health provider. It is fully accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). Several programs are highly ranked by U.S. News & World Report. For the past four years, the IHP has been named to the Honor Roll in The Chronicle of Higher Education’s “Great College to Work For” annual survey, and has been named a Great College for eight consecutive years.

CHELSEA STUDENTS ON DEAN’S LIST AT BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Two Chelsea residents have recently been named to the Dean’s List at Boston University for the Spring semester.

Students recognized for this honor include: Sara Beqo, Lia C. Ring.

Each school and college at Boston University has their own criterion for the Dean’s List, but students generally must attain a 3.5 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale), or be in the top 30 percent of their class, as well as a full course load as a full time student.

LOCAL STUDENTS RECEIVE DEGREE FROM SIMMONS COLLEGE

The following local students recently earned a degree from Simmons College in Boston.

* Meta Partenheimer, of Chelsea, earned a Master of Science in Library and Information Science (Archives Management).

* Kirsten Goodman, of Chelsea , earned a Master of Science in Nursing (Family Nurse Practitioner).

* Maria Pelosi, of Chelsea , earned a Master of Social Work

Simmons College ( www.simmons.edu ) is a nationally recognized private college located in the heart of Boston. Founded in 1899, Simmons is the only undergraduate women’s college in Boston, and maintains a history of visionary thinking and a focus on social responsibility. Follow Simmons on Twitter at @SimmonsCollege and @SimmonsNews.

ROMERO NAMED TO SIMMONS COLLEGE DEAN’S LIST

Dariela Lizbeth Romero, Chelsea was named to the 2018 spring semester dean’s list at Simmons College in Boston.

Simmons College ( www.simmons.edu ) is a nationally recognized private college located in the heart of Boston. Founded in 1899, Simmons is the only undergraduate women’s college in Boston, and maintains a history of visionary thinking and a focus on social responsibility. Follow Simmons on Twitter at @SimmonsCollege and @SimmonsNews.

Read More

Police Briefs 07-12-2018

Police Briefs 07-12-2018

Monday, 6/18

Jose Sanchez, 21, 63 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for a warrant.

Tuesday, 6/19

Bryan Cabrera, 21, 45 Heard St., Chelsea, was arrested for stop sign violation, operating motor vehicle with a suspended license and carrying dangerous weapon.

Gustavo Contreras, 45, 151 Division St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed.

David Hernandez Arevalo, 20, 40 Maverick St., Chelsea, was arrested for a warrant.

William Hernandez-Galdamez, 35, 263 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery.

Wednesday, 6/20

Weimar Pineda-Bedoya, 25, 1061 Saratoga St., East Boston, was arrested for witness intimidation.

Thales Silva, 21, 74 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and unregistered motor vehicle.

Marco Roman, 21, 31 Crescent Ave., Everett, was arrested on warrants.

Luis Llanso, 34, 69 McGreevey Way, Roxbury, was arrested for assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and on warrants.

Thursday, 6/21

Harold Aguirre Godoy, 23, 154 Shawmut St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Saturday, 6/23

Jose Guerrero, 30, 69 Addison St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and stop sign violation.

Kiana Rivera, 23, 284 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Daniel Lopez-Galdamez, 32, 13 Blossom, St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, reckless operation of motor vehicle, leaving scene of property damage, marked lanes violation, speeding and operating motor vehicle with suspended license.

Sunday, 6/24

Camilo Ruiz, 44, 57 Heard St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and red light violation.

Juan Ramos, 32, 117 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for witness intimidation, miscellaneous common law violation and disorderly conduct.

Monday, 6/25

Tito Ebanks-Lopez, 29, 61 Exeter St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Frank Arsenault, 48, 34 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, leaving scene of property damage, marked lanes violation and possessing alcoholic beverage.

Tuesday, 6/26

Frederick Stearns, 46, 76 Tudor St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Wednesday, 6/27

Sandra Sargent, 33, 71 Winthrop Ave., ,Revere, was arrested on warrants.

Thursday, 6/28/18

Eddy Torres, 24, 165 Mountain Ave., Revere, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, marked lanes violation, negligent operation of motor vehicle and threat to commit a crime.

Friday, 6/29

Kevin Johnson, 19, 250 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant, operating motor vehicle with suspended license and one way violation.

Saturday, 6/30

Justin Williams, 29, 547 Proctor Ave., Revere, was arrested for trespassing.

Luis Cahuil, 37, 649 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor.

Miguel Munguia, 32, 84 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing, disturbing the peace and possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle.

Abel Jimenez, 29, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage.

Julio Portillo, 51, Pine Street Inn, Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage.

Sunday, 7/1

Jennifer Corey, 37, 28 Park St., Malden, was arrested for utter false check, forgery of c heck and larceny by check over $250.

Read More

Campaign Stop

Campaign Stop

The question: What are we going to do about Trump? The answer came from Congressman Michael Capuano to Anchors Weigh resident Carole Oles during a campaign stop for the Somerville-born congressman. Capuano and several supporters from Chelsea sponsored the event Monday night, July 2.

Read More

Oath of Office

Oath of Office

The Honorable Stacey Fortes, Robert A. Brennan, and Paul C. Dawley applaud the Honorable Matthew J. Machera after the Oath Of Office was administered. Machera was sworn in on Weds., June 27, as the new First Justice of the Chelsea District Court. Machera had been the acting First Justice, and it became official on June 27 at a ceremony that packed Courtroom 1 at Chelsea Court.

Read More

CBC Hosts Candidates Forum for District Attorney, U.S. Congress

CBC Hosts Candidates Forum for District Attorney, U.S. Congress

The Chelsea Black Community (CBC), under the leadership of President Joan Cromwell, hosted a Candidates Forum on June 27 at the Chelsea Senior Center.

Four of the five candidates for the Suffolk County District Attorney’s position in the Sept. 4 Democratic Primary– Linda Champion, Rachael Rollins, Shannon McAuliffe, and Evandro Carvalho – participated in the forum. Cromwell announced that DA candidate Greg Henning was invited to the forum, but was unable to attend due to another commitment.

Boston City Councilor-at-Large Ayanna Pressley, candidate for U.S. Congress, took part in the CBC’s Congressional Candidates Forum. Congressman Michael Capuano was unable to attend because Congress was in session in Washington, D.C.

The four DA candidates presented their qualifications for the position and stated how they would run the DA’s office if they were elected. There were some spirited remarks by the candidates while discussing issues such as immigration, sanctuary cities, criminal justice reform, the homeless, diversion programs, the opioid crisis, and the safety of residents in Suffolk County.

Rollins delivered the most eye-opening comments of the forum when she spoke about the lack of diversity in positions of leadership at ROCA, the Chelsea-based agency led by CEO Molly Baldwin. Rollins’ comments came after McAuliffe, a former director at Roca, had rebutted Rollins’ earlier statement that she [Rollins] had management experience at Massport, MassDOT, and the MBTA, which, Rollins noted, are much larger organizations than ROCA.

McAuliffe said, “We heard a little bit about Roca leading 17 people and I want to be really clear about this: The staff of Roca is 17 people, but it is an agency with over 200 young men who are the highest risk in the county, and helping to give them what they need to actually turn away from crime. I will let everybody leave their own opinions to themselves about the MBTA and Massport and what we’ve actually seen about those companies, but what I can say about Roca is that it is effective, it’s data-driven, it’s innovative, and it’s about leading radical change.”

Rollins responded vigorously to McAuliffe, saying, “I was fortunate enough after Shannon left Roca, to be offered the job of director of Roca, and what was disappointing to me is that I would have been the first person of color in the 30-year history of Roca to ever have that position. Roca has inserted itself into communities of color and its management is historically not people of color. And I am very, very tired, very candidly, of communities of color being led by people that don’t look like us, and we are not asked to sit at the table. So I am very proud of my history of hiring people of color, and women, at the MBTA, Massport, and MassDOT, and I hope ROCA works really hard to make sure that they get some more diversity in their leadership.”

Pressley, who received the most enthusiastic ovation of the night upon her introduction, said, “I am running for Seventh Congressional District because this is the most diverse district, and yet it is the most unequal. And if you need any evidence of that, you get on the No. 111 bus and just try to get to work on time, or you can get on the No. 1 bus in Harvard Square in Cambridge and ride it all the way to Dudley Square in Roxbury. And what you will see visually is a stark contrast of life experiences, median household income, and life expectancy drop by decades.

“My opponent has been a reliable vote – given these times, that is no longer good enough,” Pressley continued. “This district deserves and these times demand activist leadership, leaders that will vote the right way, that will lead, that will legislate, that will be bold – and I want to underscore the intention in legislating: to uplift families, to advance communities, and to reduce harm.”

Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson, who represented Capuano at the forum, delivered a speech highlighting Capuano’s many accomplishments in office as Chelsea’s congressman.

Sharon Caulfield, associate dean of Bunker Hill Community College, did a masterful job as the moderator of the forum. Caulfield, whose husband, Michael, and daughter, Emily, looked on proudly in the audience, kept the program moving smoothly, was professional and courteous in her manner, and was impartial in her actions.

Joan Cromwell thanked Chelsea Community Cable Television and its executive director, Duke Bradley, for televising the forum and the Chelsea Record for its publicizing and coverage of the forum.

Cromwell said in concluding her remarks, “This [forum] was good.”

And all who participated in and attended the forum,  agreed.

Read More

Healthy Chelsea Launches New Website

Healthy Chelsea Launches New Website

The Healthy Chelsea Coalition has just launched a new website.

Heathy Chelsea was founded in 2010 when obesity was identified as the city’s top health concern through a community health needs assessment (CHNA) conducted by Mass General’s Center for Community Health Improvement.

Two years later, the coalition voted to expand its focus as residents and community partners identified substance use and its effects, including violence and public safety, as the city’s top health concern. From its inception, Healthy Chelsea has enjoyed substantial support from City leadership including the City Manager, Director of Health and Human Services, the School Department, Chelsea Police Dept. and others.

Through the new website, Jennifer Kelly, Director of Healthy Chelsea, is “excited to showcase all the great work that we are doing with our community partners. We also hope to educate residents about our programs and to encourage their participation in these important efforts.”

Coalition priorities featured on the site center around healthy eating and living strategies in both the schools and larger community; the Youth Food Movement (YFM) internship program, which allows high school and middle school students to advocate for higher-quality food in their school; promoting a trauma sensitive city; increasing community connection; and, a relatively new initiative focused on early childhood development.

Kelly is especially happy to talk about the recently funded youth substance use prevention work. Through a federal Drug Free Communities (DFC) grant and state Substance Abuse Prevention Collaborative (SAPC) initiative, the coalition has hired two new staff members who are engaging youth and parents while also working with various community partners to implement proven strategies to reduce substance use disorders.

Healthy Chelsea is supported by the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Community Health Improvement (CCHI).

Mass General’s Vice President of Community Health, Joan Quinlan, said, “We are so proud of the work that Healthy Chelsea is doing and of our strong partnership with the Chelsea community. Now, with the launch of their new website, everyone can learn more about their programs and the significant impact they are making.”

Kelly added, “It’s wonderful to be able to promote what can happen when residents and community partners come together for the health and well-being of their community.”

Visit http://www.healthychelsea.org to learn more about their focus areas and programs; staff profiles; community partners; news and upcoming events; and, much more.

Read More

Foley Installed as President Of the Rotary Club of Chelsea

Foley Installed as President Of the Rotary Club of Chelsea

Maureen Foley was installed as the 91st president of the Rotary Club of Chelsea at the organization’s Installation of Officers Receptions June 21 at the Homewood Suites Event Center.

Rotary Club President David Mindlin (right) and President-Elect Maureen Foley congratulate Paul Harris Fellow honoree Ledia Koco after she received the prestigious award.

Foley was on her home turf. She is the director of community relations for Colwen Hotel Management which operates three hotels in Chelsea, with a fourth, brand new hotel on the Chelsea-Revere line set to open soon.

Foley has become the face of the busy and beautiful hotels since their openings. She is visible at community events and has been a goodwill ambassador for Colwen with her numerous philanthropic and community-spirited endeavors.

And now she’s ready to lead one of the city’s most prominent service organizations that has been here for close to a century. She succeeds outgoing president, Attorney David C. Mindlin.

“When I came to Chelsea and Saritin [Rizzuto] invited me to my first meeting, I had no idea what Rotary was,” said Foley. “I came to make business connections because my company was building a hotel here, but it didn’t take very long before it wasn’t about the business connections any more, it was about a feeling – that I was part of something special and I wanted to stay.”

Foley, who is the eighth woman to serve as Rotary Club of Chelsea president, called it “a great honor” to be the new leader of the club. She noted that Rotary International approved a new vision statement last years.

“It says, together we see a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change – across the globe, in our communities, and in ourselves,” Foley told the gathering.

“Preparing for tonight and the year ahead,” Foley continued, “I thought about that statement and this year’s ‘Be the Inspiration.’

“Inspiration comes from the Latin word, meaning to breathe into; to put life into. I realize before inspiring passion, energy, enthusiasm, or excitement into our club, all of us must work to create change within ourselves, to first inspire ourselves to bring new attitudes, ideas, and passions to Rotary.”

Concluding her remarks, she said, “I am sure the Chelsea Rotary Club can be the inspiration for each other, for our community, and for all those who will follow us in the next 91 years.”

As proud as Maureen Foley was to take office as Rotary president, you could sense the equal feeling of joy and proudness in her daughter, Marika, son, Peter, and 5-year-old granddaughter, Aria, who sat together at a table closest to the podium.

Read More

On Hold:‘Real Discussion’ Unfolds Regarding Small Liquor Bottles, Special Meeting Aug 28

On Hold:‘Real Discussion’ Unfolds Regarding Small Liquor Bottles, Special Meeting Aug 28

The Chelsea Licensing Commission has put on hold the ban of small liquor bottles (100 ml) after a hearing Tuesday night where numerous package store owners from the City came forward to protest the change.

The hearing came on the heels of the ban of “nip” bottles last month, with Chelsea being the first municipality to ban the sale of the one-shot bottles of liquor. That was to be followed up with the potential ban of small liquor bottles too. However, Chair Mark Rossi said the strong turnout from the liquor licensees in the City caused the Board to pause.

“They told us this would essentially put them out of business,” said Rossi. “The sales of small liquor bottles have been up since the ban on nips and the liquor stores were supplementing the lost income from nips with the 100 ml bottles. The positive on this is there was actually a dialog. This is the first time that has happened. Chelsea is the first municipality that has pub in a ban on nips. Based on that, it showed the community is serious about this issues. All parties considered this a problem.”

He said about half of the 16 package store license holders were at the meeting, which lasted more than two hours.

The result is the ban has been put on hold, but a special meeting has been called for Aug. 28 and a voluntary ban has been called for.

“We are calling a special meeting to address this and pick up where we left off,” Rossi said. “This is the first time I’ve ever seen something like this.”

He said the liquor license holders were asked as a show of good faith to meet with the Police Department and voluntarily ban 100 ml bottles (particularly McCormack’s and Ruble) within 30 days. While the License Commission rarely meets in the summer, Rossi said they would call the special meeting for an update, with the hope being the ban can work informally.

Police Chief Brian Kyes said he is still for the ban, but was encouraged by the willingness of the liquor license holders during the meeting.

“Although the Chelsea Police strongly encourages the commission to proceed with the ban as proposed, I am encouraged that these licensed businesses are engaged in dialogue with the commission, the community and understanding their role in this serious issue,” he said. “Moving forward, we will continue to focus enforcement on any business that violates City licensing rules and state law, especially those that have such an adverse effect on the community.”

But not all was lost in the matter, which is an issue pushed by residents and several city councilors, including Councilor Roy Avellaneda.

Rossi said it was impressed on the liquor license holders that they need to be more connected to the community. He said it was interesting to note that none of them were as involved as they thought they were – particularly in things like the Chamber of Commerce or the local non-profits.

“The idea is we’re not looking to push anyone out of business, but to address a systemic, decades-old problem everyone agrees exists in Chelsea,” he said. “This is a positive step forward to address that issue…It’s important liquor store owners realize they are members of the community and aware of their actions on others. No one wants to go to the hair salon next to a liquor store where they have to step over the urine-soaked body of a perons passed out in the doorway.”

Read More

Ledia Koco Receives the Paul Harris Fellow Award

Ledia Koco Receives the Paul Harris Fellow Award

Rotary President-Elect said that Ledia Koco was a wonderful example of the importance of the Interact Club at Chelsea High School.

Koco, 25, was a member and president of the CHS Interact Club during her four years at the school. Interact Club is sponsored by the Chelsea Rotary Club and introduces students to the club’s service to the community and its international reach.

For her outstanding efforts as an Interact leader and senior facilitator of Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) her 1,000 hours of community service, and her continued work in the community, Koco was honored as the recipient of the Rotary Foundation of Rotary International’s Paul Harris Fellow Award at the club’s Installation of Officers Reception at the Homewood Suites Hotel.

Past President Allan Alpert handled the formal presentation of the award to Koco.

“All Paul Harris Awards are important and very distinguished, but this one is a little more special because it’s the members of the Rotary Club that honored you by making you a Paul Harris Fellow for all the things that you have done in your very short time here,” said Alpert.

Koco is the daughter of Luan and Manjola Koco, who are originally from Albania. A former model who finished as first-runnerup in a major pageant, Ledia graduated in 2011 from Chelsea High where she was an honor roll student and member of the National Honor Society. She continued her education at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania, receiving her degree in International Relations and Spanish.

Koco continued her membership in RYLA while at Bucknell, teaching other students in work force development. She is a member of the Chelsea Enhacement Team, which is a volunteer organization who participates in community service such as beautification efforts in the city.

“Ledia is the administrative assistant to the Chelsea City Council and probably the youngest person that has ever held that very distinguished honor,” said Alpert.

Koco humbly accepted the prestigious award.

“This is such an honor – I’m overwhelmed right now,” she said. “I just want to say that I feel incredibly honored to be gifted the Paul Harris Fellow Award, especially because it helps raise millions of dollars for the Rotary Foundation.”

Koco said her commitment to public service began early in her life.

“I always knew I wanted to make a difference, especially having emigrated to the States from a Third World country, Albania,” said Koco. “But it wasn’t until I joined Interact and started doing community service, that I realized how much of an impact you can make starting from the bottom up. I didn’t need a fancy job or to be an adult to make a difference. Through Rotary and Interact, I was able to give back to my community regardless.”

She thanked the Rotary Club for presenting her a college scholarship, along with helping to build her leadership skills.

“The irony here is while Rotary is recognizing me, I feel like I should really be recognizing Rotary,” she added thoughtfully.

Koco concluded her remarks by thanking her mentors, including her favorite high school teacher, Ilana Ascher, the Chelsea City Council, Council Clerk Paul Casino, and “my parents, the hardest-working people I know –

I want to thank you for your unconditional love and support.”

Koco received a warm ovation from the many Rotary members and guests in attendance.

“This was an outstanding honor for one of Chelsea’s young adults who is making a difference in our community,” said Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson. “I wanted to be here tonight to join the Rotary in this much-deserved recognition of Ledia’s contributions to Chelsea with this prestigious award. I congratulate her on behalf of all my colleagues in city government and the citizens of Chelsea.”

Read More