Clark Ave’s Siriani Named Rotary Teacher of the Year

Clark Ave’s Siriani Named Rotary Teacher of the Year

It came as quite a surprise, but was much deserved, as Supt. Mary Bourque and Clark Avenue Middle School Principal Michael Talbot informed Clark Ave teacher Sally Siriani on May 31 that she was the Chelsea Rotary

Supt. Mary Bourque, Teacher of the Year Sally Siriani, and Clark Ave Principal Michael Talbot.

Teacher of the Year.

Siriani has spent 20 years in the district, all at the Clark Avenue Middle teaching math and science in grades 5 and 6.

“I love the kids,” she said. “I as born to do this. I put magnets on the refrigerator when I was little and pretended to grade homework papers. I played school all day. My friend Holly Correia, who now teaches in Revere, would always play school. We would take stuffed animals and put them in seats and play school all day long. I’m flattered and honored and shocked. It’s great to be recognized.”

Siriani grew up in Winthrop and attended Catholic Schools there, graduating from Winthrop High School in 1990. She attended Fitchburg State and then worked at the now-closed Assumption School in Chelsea. When it closed down, she was hired to be one of the first teachers in 1998 to come into the new Clark Avenue Middle School.

Previously, the building was used as Chelsea High School.

Current Supt. Mary Bourque was the assistant principal at the time and said that Siriani was the backbone of the school.

“Personally, I know Ms. Siriani from our early days at the Clark Avenue School and her deep devotion to providing the highest quality education for all students,” said Bourque. “I also remember the days when a new school was but a conversation for us all. Ms. Siriani has lived through another Clark Avenue Middle School milestone – construction – and is now teaching  a new generation of students in the new building that we used to only dream about in 1998.”

Principal Talbot said her strength is building relationships with her students.

“She collaborates with the other Math teacher at her grade level in order to best meet the needs of all of her students,” he said. “She regularly uses pre-assessments to see where the gaps are and flexibly groups her students in differentiated activities in order to help them with the mastery of the skills that are required. She also asks students to self-assess themselves, set realistic and challenging goals, and then plans thoughtful learning activities for all of her students.  She works incredibly hard on behalf of her students and she is able to build strong relationships with her students, as evidenced by so many coming back to see her each year.”

Siriani was to be honored at the Rotary Lunch on Tuesday, June 5.

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Packed Chambers:Budget Passes, but with Some Rare Controversy, Drama

Packed Chambers:Budget Passes, but with Some Rare Controversy, Drama

The City Budget vote at the Council is usually a night of empty seats and methodical tabulation.

Not so this past Monday night when teachers, students and School Department employees packed the Chambers and councillors debated over several controversial cuts to the document.

One councillor, Bob Bishop, even cast a lone vote against the City Budget.

In the end, the Council did approve the budget 10-1.

The total spending came in at $195,964,074, with the breakdown as follows:

  • General Fund Budget, $174,074,177.
  • Water Enterprise Fund, $8,397,199.
  • Sewer Enterprise Fund, 12,808,779.
  • General Fund Free Cash, $683,919.

The total sum represents an increase of 6.6 percent over last year’s budget.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said it was a document that represented a philosophy in government and he was proud of it.

“A budget is not just a compilation of numbers and spreadsheets,” he said. “A budget is always a document expressing a philosophy of government. This budget delivers services and programs and invests in our people, our community.”

The real drama came for the School Department, which needed a large influx of City cash into its coffers to avoid massive cuts to it program after being shorted several years by the state’s funding formula.

The City is required to give a set amount of money to the School Department each year, but in the budget crunch of the last few years, the City has kicked in extra funding. On Monday, numerous representatives from the schools were there to speak in support of what amounts to about $4 million (or 5.7 percent) above the required spending amount.

“The state is letting Chelsea down,” said Sam Baker, vice president of the Chelsea Teacher’s Union. “They can’t be relied upon to support urban Gateway districts like Chelsea…When the federal government lets you down, the state government lets you down, there is only one place left to turn – to the neighbors and the local officials of the city. This budget shows that the students and schools in Chelsea can rely on their local neighbors.”

Several others spoke as well, particularly for keeping special education position intact – positions that have been cut heavily in the past few years. School Committee Chair Jeannette Velez urged the Council to approve the additional spending in the budget.

After the vote, the room erupted in applause for the sake of the schools.

But it wasn’t that easy.

While the Council was uniformly in favor of the school measures, there were several things they were flat out against. Major amendments were proposed and hashed out on close votes over the course of an hour.

Almost all of them were proposed by Council President Damali Vidot.

First was a cut of $15,000 to the Law Department – which was a dart in the back of many on the Council. The cut represented funding put in the budget for the Council to have its own attorney on retainer to give them a second opinion when they aren’t satisfied with the City’s staff lawyers.

Only Councillor Giovanni Recupero and Damali Vidot voted for it, with it losing 9-2.

One cut that did survive was a $100,000 cut to the Fire Department as a shot across the bow for their use, and some on the Council would say abuse, of overtime in the last few years.

Vidot said the Department has seen numerous new hires in the last year and has proposed to increase its overtime budget. She said that number should be going down, not up.

The cut was approved 6-4, with Vidot, Recupero, Bishop, Luis Tejada, Enio Lopez and Rodriguez voting yes.

Vidot also proposed to cut the Police Department salaries by $150,000 to curtail the use of overtime pay being given to officers who do walking beats around the downtown. She said that should come out of regular pay at the regular rate, not as overtime pay.

That measure lost narrowly, on a 5-6 vote. Those voting against that were Calvin Brown, Tejada, Avellaneda, Robinson, Perlatonda, and Garcia.

A major discussion took place after that to cut the new Downtown Coordinator position, which comes at $72,000. Vidot said it was a failed program and should be staffed by a Chelsea person who can bring all different Chelsea residents to the downtown to connect in one place. She said she doesn’t see that happening.

However, the majority felt that good things were happening and the coordinator needed more time.

A key supporter was downtown district Councillor Judith Garcia.

That cut failed 3-8, with only Vidot, Lopez and Bishop voting for it.

The final controversial cut proposal was to eliminate monies being spent to keep retiring EMS Director Allan Alpert on board for a year. Alpert plans to retire on June 30, but will be kept on as a consultant to bring the new director up to speed. The cost for that is $55,000.

Vidot said it was unnecessary, and she said it’s time to stop keeping retiring City Hall people on the payroll as consultants.

However, other councillors such as Avellaneda, said there was a succession plan in place for Alpert that didn’t pan out. Now, to make sure a new plan could be put in place, Alpert needed to be allowed to stay on another year.

After much controversial discussion, the cut was defeated narrowly 5-6. Those voting to keep Alpert on were Rodriguez, Tejada, Avellaneda, Robinson, Perlatonda, and Garcia.

For the overall budget, all councillors except Bishop voted for it.

Bishop, who has emerged as a staunch fiscal conservative on the Council, said the spending was not sustainable.

“I cannot vote for this budget,” he said. “I can’t be for this budget because it is not sustainable. We’ll hit the wall one day and that $25 million in the Rainy Day Fund will go out one ear because out budget is almost all salaries.”

The City Budget goes into effect on July 1.

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Residency Ordinance for Police, Fire Hires Holds Firm at Council

Residency Ordinance for Police, Fire Hires Holds Firm at Council

A last ditch effort by Councillor Roy Avellaneda to reverse the new police and fire residency ordinance successfully passed by Councillor Giovanni Recupero failed on Monday night, June 4, in a close vote.

It represented seven years of twists and turns for Recupero’s number one issue and one that has been before the Council in several forms about a dozen times.

On Monday, the victory came in a narrow defeat of Avellaneda’s proposal, 5-6, which allowed the proposal to become the new law.

Those voting to keep the residency ordinance were Councillors Damali Vidot, Enio Lopez, Bob Bishop, Luis Tejada, Joe Perlatonda and Recupero – a one vote margin of victory.

Those voting to reconsider and repeal the ordinance were Councillors Yamir Rodriguez, Calvin Brown, Avellaneda, Leo Robinson and Judith Garcia.

“This is a good thing,” said Recupero. “It’s something the citizens of Chelsea wanted and I’ve fought for it for seven years solid. Now the councillors wanted it too. I think it’s good for the City and for the people. The police and fire can live in the neighborhood and understand the people and the people can understand them and respect them. The young men and women of the city will relate to them because they live in the same community.”

The matter will apply to anyone hired in the Police or Fire Department after July 31, 2018. It will require them to live in Chelsea for five years after starting on the job. After five years, they can move out of the city if they choose.

The negative came in that to get the measure, it had to become a collective bargaining issue. That meant that the entire Police and Fire Departments would get a raise in order to include the new condition in their contracts. Even those for whom the measure doesn’t apply will get additional pay to accept the new condition.

“Hey, it’s good for those on the department too,” said Recupero. “They’re all going to get a raise, but we’re going to get new officers that want to live in Chelsea.”

Councillor Leo Robinson said he was against the measure because of the cost. He said he was once in favor of residency, but that changed when he learned about the collective bargaining costs.

“The bottom line is you have 40 police living in the city and 26 firefighters right now,” he said. “ When we have to go and negotiate with the union that means 110 police and 96 firefighters get raises. That’s $200,000 we’ll have to give them. I think it’s foolish to do. They think it’s a great thing. You have Bob Bishop voting against the budget because he says it out of control and then he votes for this without knowing what it costs.”

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Auditions Being Held Midsummer Night’s Dream

Auditions Being Held Midsummer Night’s Dream

Apollinaire Play Lab invites youth ages 11 to 16 to audition for their summer production of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream! The youth production will take place in August, following the professional company’s production of the same play this July in PORT Park. All performances are FREE!

Apollinaire Theatre Company is known for environmentally staging its summer park shows. The audience moves with the action of the play, and different scenes are staged in different areas of the park. (If you attended the PORT Park production of Hamlet in 2016 you might recall the titular character delivering his to-be-or-not-to-be speech from atop one of the towering salt piles.) Following in the footsteps of the professional company, Apollinaire’s young actors will employ environmental staging with their youth production. The audience will be taken from in the Riseman Family Theatre out into Chelsea Square!

Armando Rivera, whom you may have seen on the Apollinaire stage (Everyman, First Love is the Revolution), will be directing the show. Armando has been a teacher and director at the Play Lab since 2016, just before the opening of the Riseman Family Theatre at the Chelsea Theatre Works. Armando says, “This is an amazing opportunity for young artists to create work that will be shared directly with their community. Our production of Shakespeare’s Midsummer will be a hilariously fun learning experience for everyone who gets involved.”

Auditions are being held this Saturday, June 9 at 2:00. You can email apl@aplylab.com to reserve your audition slot. There is no need to prepare a monologue and no previous acting experience is required. Youth who are interested in design and working backstage are encouraged to audition as well! Auditions will be in an open class format, and the entire group will work together over the course of the 45 – 60 minute audition.

The Play Lab didn’t forget Chelsea’s younger budding thespians! There are also dance & singing performance classes available this summer for youth ages 4-11. Children in these classes will appear as the fairies in two of the youth performances of Midsummer lending extra magic to the production! No audition is required for these classes; registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The Play Lab makes scholarships available to ALL who need them to attend!

Crista Núñez, who began teaching at the Play Lab in the spring, will lead the dance & singing performance classes. Crista, originally from Guatemala, has taught more than 300 students during her career at Ballet Armonía. She studied ballet for 18 years with the methodology of the Royal Academy of Dance from London. As a vocalist, she has won first place in national contests as a soloist and with her band. “Discipline and art are perfectly combined by participating in this class and performances of Midsummer,” says Crista. “Students will grow as professionals, experience being an integral part of a performance, and gain confidence.”

The Play Lab’s production of Midsummer is part of a larger effort organized by The Neighborhood Developers (TND) in conjunction with the City of Chelsea’s Downtown Initiative to activate Chelsea Square with arts programing this summer. In addition to the two-week run of the youth production of Midsummer (August 10-12 and 17-19), there will be other regular performances in Chelsea Square throughout the summer, including live music. The kickoff event for the summer series in Chelsea Square is Thursday, June 9, from 6:00 to 8:00pm. The Apollinaire Play Lab will be hosting a booth with fairy-themed crafts and sign-ups for the audition and dance & singing classes.

Visit them online at aplaylab.com! Or you can call (617) 615-6506.

The Apollinaire Play Lab is a program of Apollinaire Theatre Company (ATC), Chelsea’s award-winning professional theatre.  ATC produces adventurous contemporary theatre, and free outdoor summer shows. The ATC’s home is the Chelsea Theatre Works in Chelsea Square, which houses their three theatres: the Apollinaire Theatre, the Riseman Family Theatre, and the Black Box—a co-working rental theatre for Boston Area performing artists. Visit them on the web at www.apollinairetheatre.com.

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Police Briefs 06-07-2018

Police Briefs 06-07-2018

HARRASSES WOMEN

On May 21, officers were dispatched to Jefferson Avenue for a female party reporting that a male party followed her home and was still outside of her residence. Officers met with the reporting party, who stated that a male followed her home and grabbed her arm at one point to try to talk to her. She refused his advances and told him to leave, but he continued following her to her home. The victim identified the male leaning against a fence on her property. He was placed under arrest.

Lucio Ayala Rodriguez, 33, of Revere, was charged with criminal harassment and assault and battery.

DRUG RAID ON PARK

On May 24, members of the Chelsea Police Drug Unit executed a search warrant at 148 Park St. #4.  The search warrant was the result of an investigation of a male subject for the Distribution of Crack Cocaine. Also assisting was Everett Police drug detectives.

Hector Sanchez-Balestier, 34, of 148 Park St., was charged with possession to distribute Class B drugs.

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Obituaries 06-07-2018

Obituaries 06-07-2018

Francis ‘Frank’ Duggan, Jr.

January 20, 1932 – May 31, 2018

Francis T. “Frank” Duggan, Jr. passed away on Thursday, May 31, at the Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home where he had been receiving supportive care for the past four years.  He was 86 years old.

Born on Nantucket Island, the beloved son of the late Francis T. Sr. and Theresa P. (Heffernan) Duggan, he grew up in Cambridge where he attended local schools.

He enlisted into the US Army and served honorably during the Korean Conflict, returned to Cambridge and was employed for many years working for the Polaroid Corp with plant services and maintenance.   He settled in Chelsea several years ago and resided at Admirals Hill Towers for most of that time.  He was a member of the American Legion Post 61 in Revere and volunteered his time at the VA Homeless Shelter in Boston.

In his lifetime, he was a great Boston sports fan and a diehard and devoted Red Sox fan.  He lived a very military regimented life style.  During the past years at the nursing home, he participated   in  many activities. Well-known   for   wearing   stylish sunglasses, he was affectionately nicknamed “Hollywood” by residents and home staff members.

Frank was the former husband of the late Rosemarie (Melanson) Duggan and Janet L. (Gaylord) Duggan. He was the father of Kevin Duggan, Cheryl Willette and Mark Duggan, all of Woburn, Thomas Duggan of New Hampshire, Karen Michelle Duggan and Michael Duggan, both of Everett and the late Francis T. Duggan, III and the brother of Mary Duggan of Sarasota, FL and the late John “Jack” Duggan.  He is also survived by numerous grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Private Funeral Services will be conducted on Friday, June 8 from the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea to be followed by military honors and interment at the Massachusetts National Cemetery in Bourne.  For online guestbook or to send expressions of sympathy, please visit: www.WelshFuneralHome.com

Armando Giannasca

Of Chelsea, formerly of East Boston

Armando Giannasca of Chelsea, formerly of East Boston, passed away peacefully on May 23 at the age of 82.

He was the beloved husband of Mary Ann (Savignano) Giannasca, loving father of Michael Giannasca and his wife, Gina of Lynnfield and Armando Giannasca and his wife, Elizabeth of Peabody; adored grandfather of Amanda, Matthew, Lily, Armando and Ava; dear brother of Elena Cerundolo, Emilo Giannasca of Florida and the late Jenny Bruno, Yolanda Cutiello, and Fiore Giannasca. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews.

Funeral arrangements were by Vazza’s “Beechwood” Funeral Home, Revere.

Entombment was at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. For guest book, please visit:

www.vazzafunerals.com

Marjorie Irene Doucette

Of Chelsea

Marjorie Irene Doucette passed away Friday evening, June 1 at the Nemasket Healthcare Center in Middleboro after a sudden decline in health.

Born and raised in Chelsea, she was the beloved daughter of the late Victor and Marjorie (Button) Littlejohn. She attended local schools and graduated from Chelsea High School. She wed John E. Doucette and settled in Chelsea raising her family of five daughters and three sons. Marjorie also worked outside of her home as a quality jewelry inspector for Town and Country in Chelsea.

A resident of Chelsea for most of her life, Marjorie has been residing in Bridgewater for the past 13 years. She is lovingly remembered for her feisty spirit and fun-loving personality.

In her lifetime, she enjoyed reading and crossword puzzles and most of all, she enjoyed time spent in the company of family and friends.

In addition to her parents, Marjorie was preceded in death by two grandchildren and her beloved husband, John E. Doucette, Jr. in 1993. She was the devoted mother of MaryAnne Beck and her late husband, James of Bridgewater, Robert Doucette and his wife, Patricia of Chelsea, Ronald Doucette, Richard Doucette of Bridgewater, Diane Gonzalez and her late husband, Andre of Easley, SC, Eleanor “Ellen” Grungo and her husband, John of Middleboro, Patricia Gibbons of Everett and Barbara Bessette and her husband, Scott of Lakeville. She was the cherished grandmother of 14 and great grandmother of nine.

Funeral services will be conducted from the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway Chelsea today, Thursday, June 7 at 10 a.m. Services will conclude with Interment at Glenwood Cemetery, Everett. Relatives and friends are most kindly invited to attend.

Robert ‘Skip’ Mugford, Sr.

Formerly of Chelsea

Robert A. (Skip) Mugford, Sr., RPT, passed away due to the ravages of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) with his loving wife and children by his side.  He was born in Chelsea to Leander and Emmie Mugford, the youngest of seven children and was preceded in death by his sisters, Gertrude and Nellie, his brother, Murray, step-daughter Valerie Rush and hisnewborn grandchild, Anna Rush. He is survived by his sister, Marion Bishop, brothers George and Frank Mugford and a veritable multitude of loving nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews and great-great nieces.  He is also survived by his loving wife, Jean and his children: Leigh Ann Alameda (Kurt), Robert A. Mugford, Jr. (Melissa), Kristin M. Mugford, and step-son Brian Wagner (Michelle); grandchildren: Kaleigh Alameda, Robert Rodney Mugford, Curtis and Stefan Wagner and Ryan and Colin Rush.  He is also survived by his first wife and mother of his children, Carol (Erwin-Mugford) Viegelmann.

While in high school, Skip was a member of varsity football and baseball teams and the band and was elected Most Talented Senior.  He was selected to the Middlesex County All-Star football team and played in the inaugural Harry Agganis Memorial All-Star football games. He received a football scholarship to Purdue University, graduating in 1966.  He then attended Stanford University on scholarship, receiving a Certificate in  Physical Therapy in 1967.

Skip served in the U.S. Army from 1960 to 1963.  Starting in the Infantry, he served briefly as a Drill Instructor, transitioned to the Military Police and ended up as an Investigator with the 86th Criminal Investigation  Division at Ft. Benning, Georgia.

After graduating from Stanford, instead of returning to Purdue as a member of their Athletic Training Staff, he followed his true passion working in hospital rehabilitation.  He was self-employed for 40 years as a contract physical therapist specializing in geriatric orthopedics.

Skip loved all sports, especially golf (he particularly enjoyed his local golfing brethren) and senior softball, playing shortstop for the Bandits out of Walnut Creek.  He played in the Newark 50+ Senior Softball League for 15 years and was twice selected Most Inspirational Player in the League.

He dearly loved flying and piloting his Cessna T210.  He achieved the following ratings:  Single and multi engine land and instrument land.  He also completed a 10 hour stunt flying course.

Skip served as President of Newark National Little League and was a NNLL umpire for eight years.  He served as president of his Homeowners Association several times.  He also served as Little Sir and Big Sir twice for SIR Branch 59 Newark/Fremont/Union City, California.  ​

Skip was on the Inaugural Committee that began the Newark Memorial High School Athletic Boosters Crab

Feed.  He also funded scholarships in his father’s name to several NMHS graduating seniors.

His life will be celebrated at Bay Area Baptist Church,  2929 Peralta Boulevard, Fremont, CA, today, Thursday, June 7 at 11 a.m. with a reception to follow. The graveside service will be held at Chapel of the Chimes, 32992 Mission Blvd.,  Hayward, CA at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, his family kindly requests that donations be made in his name to The ALS Association Golden West Chapter, PO Box 565, Agoura Hills, CA  91376.

Robert Lovely

US Postal Service employee

Born in Boston, he was the loving son of John R. Lovely, Sr. of Chelsea and the late M. Flora (Sirois) Lovely. He worked as a postal clerk for the United States Post Office.

In addition to his father, he also leaves one sister, Dianne Landry and her husband, Charles of New Hampshire; two brothers, Richard Lovely and his wife, Lorraine of Florida and Ronald Lovely and his wife, Beatrice of Chelsea. Robert was predeceased by his brother, Jack Lovely and is also survived by many nieces and nephews.

Relatives and friends are invited to attend visiting hours in the Bisbee-Porcella Funeral Home, 549 Lincoln Ave., Saugus on Sunday from 4 to 8 p.m. Gathering at the funeral home will be on Monday at 11 a.m. followed by a funeral service at noon in the Woodlawn Chapel, Woodlawn Cemetery, 302 Elm St., Everett. For directions and condolences, visit: www.BisbeePorcella.com.

Jean Arsenault

Member of the “Zolla” family, one of Revere’s oldest families

Family and friends are invited to attend visiting hours on Monday, June 11 from 4 to 8 p.m. in the Vertuccio & Smith Home for Funerals, 773 Broadway (Route 107) Revere for Jean A. (Iovine)

Arsenault. She was 88 years old and was a Revere resident for 61 years.

Her funeral will be conducted from the funeral home on Tuesday, June 12 at 9:30 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Adelaide’s Church, 708 Lowell St., Peabody at 10:30 a.m. and will be immediately followed by interment in Puritan Lawn Memorial Park, Peabody.

Born and raised in Revere, she was a graduate of Revere High School, Class of 1948. Jean enjoyed a 15 plus year career within the Payroll Department at General Electric of Lynn. During her time there, she attended Felt & Tarrant Comptometer School. After her marriage to Donald J. Arsenault of Chelsea, the couple began raising their family in Chelsea before moving to Peabody 61 years ago. A devoted wife and mother, Jean also worked alongside her husband at their family business, “Acme Thread Co. Inc.” of Lynn for many years. For several years, she served as a Den Mother with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in Peabody. She was known for her skill at the sewing machine and her talents in her kitchen. She was an extraordinary cook and baker.

She leaves her adoring husband of 66 years, Donald J. Arsenault, Sr. of Peabody. She is the cherished mother of Donna Jean Colello and her husband, Edward of Brewster, New York and Donald J. Arsenault, Jr. of Webster, New Hampshire; the devoted grandmother of Nicholas A. Colello and his wife, Sarah of McKinney, Texas, Christopher W. Colello and his wife, Danielle of Brewster, New York, Mariana E. Colello and LeighAnne J. Colello, both of Brewster, New York and Cory D. Arsenault of Dover, New Hampshire and the great grandmother of Mackenzie Jean; dear sister to Helena I. “Helen” Gilleberto and her late husband, Antonio G. “Anthony” and Ronald N. Iovine, both of Revere and the late Robert E., Richard A. and Louis R. Iovine. She is also lovingly survived by her sisters-in-law: Edith L. Iovine of Maine and Barbara Ann Iovine of Revere.

For more information, please visit www.vertuccioandsmith.com

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Memorial Day Parade

Memorial Day Parade

The Chelsea Girl Scouts hosted their 7th annual Memorial Day Parade on Monday morning, May 28, on Broadway.
Despite the rain, they had a great turnout for the annual march up Broadway for the official exercises. Here, Kaylee Bird and Skye Travassos keep dry before the parade.

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TND to Announce Rafael Mares as New Executive Director

TND to Announce Rafael Mares as New Executive Director

As The Neighborhood Developers (TND) celebrates its 40th year in existence, the Chelsea-based organization is poised to announce its new director, Rafael Mares, at a celebration function tonight, May 31.

Rafael Mares, formerly of the Conservation Law Foundation,
will step in as the new executive director of TND in Chelsea, Revere and Everett. He replaces long-time director Ann Houston who has moved over to lead a collaborative organization between TND and Nuestra Communidad in Roxbury.

Mares is a Revere resident and will replace 15-year director Ann Houston – who will be moving on to a new collaboration project between TND and Nuestra Communidad in Roxbury. Houston will also be honored at the event May 31.

Mares has been working at the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) in the fields of housing, environmental justice and transportation – often working in the Chelsea, Revere, Everett area that TND serves.

“My work has always been on the state and regional level,” he said. “From time to time I had the opportunity work with Community Development Corporations (CDCs) in Somerville and Lawrence. I really enjoyed partnering with CDCs…So, I was particularly attracted to running a CDC in my own community of Revere…I always felt particularly excited about working on issues where I live.”

Part of the celebration will be to mark the creation of 400 affordable housing units in four years at TND, but Mares said he wants to do the same in much less time.

“My goal is to continue that good work, but speed it up,” he said. “We need to be working to do what we did in 40 years in a shorter time period. We need to be able to do that same thing in seven years…I think Greater Boston has seen significant growth and there has been pressure on people who have become displaced from housing…I feel in Chelsea, Everett and Revere – unlike downtown Boston – we still have opportunities for affordable housing unlike other areas where it’s rare. It’s extremely important to develop affordable housing before the opportunity is missed.”

Mares moved to Boston in 1996 to attend law school. After that, he worked at the Legal Services Center in Jamaica Plain for 10 years. Then he went to CLF. He now lives in Revere with his family, including three young children. Incidentally, his home in Beachmont Revere burnt down last February, and he is living temporarily in Winthrop until the home there is rebuilt.

Houston said Mares is a great follow-up for what she did, and she challenged him to speed up affordable housing development.

“I think maybe he can do even better,” she said. “I’m going to challenge him to do that much development in six years.”

CLF President Bradley Campbell wished Mares well and said he is very capable.

Rafael has been a steadfast advocate for healthy communities across New England,” said Campbell. “His work ensuring equitable access to the MBTA and fighting for environmental justice in places like Lawrence, Massachusetts will have a lasting impact on countless lives. All of us at CLF will certainly miss his energy and the passion he showed for his work over the last nine years.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said he is looking forward to working with him.

“I’m excited for TND and have a great deal of respect for Rafael,” he said. “He was a tremendous advocate at CLF. I feel he’s capable, straight forward and helpful. I’m looking forward to him taking on this new role.”

For Houston, she will be moving on to head up a new collaboration called OppCo, which offers services to CDCs – with the founding collaborators being TND and Nuestra.

She said there are a lot of things that can be done to scale, such as some services and administration of CDCs. However, she said they are looking to create something that keeps the power local and keeps the local touch in place while also saving money on combining services.

“The challenge we face is our work grows increasingly complex and to be efficient, we need greater scale,” she said. “You see savings, but you can lose that local connection. That connection is our most precious resource and we can’t lose that. TND has always been an organization that didn’t do well having to make a choice…OppCo is the answer to how we can do both.”

She said some of the services could include financial management, real estate development, asset management, residential services, data analysis.

“We hope OppCo becomes something that allows CDCs to increase capacity to serve local communities without sacrificing that local connection,” she said. “We’re encouraged by the excitement it’s received from CDCs so far.”

OppCo was in the planning stages all last year, and was launched officially on April 1.

The TND 40th Anniversary Gala and Annual Meeting will take place tonight, May 31, at 6 p.m. in the Homewood Suites in Chelsea. The guest speaker will be Congressman Michael Capuano, with honorees being Mike Sandoval (partner of the year), Inocencia Perez (volunteer of the year) and Jan Dumas (Revere member of the year).

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Top 100 City Salary Earners Dominated by Public Safety Employees

Top 100 City Salary Earners Dominated by Public Safety Employees

The Top 100 City employee earners list (below) from 2017 was released this week and it showed that, as has become routine, that it is dominated by police and fire personnel.

A total of 41 of the top 100 came from the Police Department, though it should be noted that some of those earnings come from paid details which aren’t paid for in total by City funds. In the Fire department, 31 members were on the Top 100 list. That rounded out 72 police and fire earners in the Top 100.

The School Department came in third with 24 members on the Top 100 list, but most of them falling in the bottom one-third of that list.

The highest paid City employee in 2017 was Chief Brian Kyes, who said he was grateful for being able to serve as chief in his hometown. He made $219,752 in 2017 – the first year that he did not work details as the chief.

“My current salary is based on an employment contract that was negotiated between the City Manager and myself last year in an effort to allow me to finish my career here in Chelsea,” he said. “Based on the terms of the contract I have agreed to serve as the Police Chief for an additional five-year term and continue to do the job that I absolutely love. Although there are lucrative opportunities beyond the borders of our city whether in the legal world or public safety, my commitment remains here in the city of Chelsea.”

Kyes said his is now beginning his 32nd year with the Chelsea Police, with the last 11 as chief. He said others have recruited him from outside the city and state, but he has decided to stay here under his new contract.

“Over the past few years I have been recruited by other agencies both within Massachusetts and outside the state to either lead or compete to run their departments,” he said. “I have also had offers from the private sector as well.  This all being said I honestly know that there is no police department like the one that we have here in Chelsea with the enduring partnerships that serve as the life-blood of our agency. This is in no small part to the dedication and commitment of the men and women, sworn and non-sworn who make up our department.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino appeared at number eight on the list, making $180,209. He said the list is dominated by police and fire because they work hard for their money in Chelsea.

“Public safety officials are paid good money and in this city they earn it,” he said. “This a difficult city to be a police officer and a firefighter. They put their lives on the line all the time. I don’t begrudge the salaries they earn. They work hard for it here.”

Name                                                     Job                                    Location                      Gross Pay

Kyes, Brian                                     Chief of Police                     Police Department               219,752.46

Fern, Joseph                                        Sergeant                          Police Department               205,227.09

Dunn, Thomas                        Captain  Police Department            Police Department               203,853.47

Batchelor, David                     Captain  Police Department            Police Department               196,668.15

Quatier, John T                                Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 194,200.46

Houghton, Keith E                  Captain  Police Department            Police Department               191,969.00

Dana, William J                     Captain  Police Department            Police Department               183,002.94

Ambrosino, Thomas  G                     City Manager                    City Managers Office             180,209.33

Bourque, Mary                             Superintendent 225               Superintendent’s Office            178,697.92

Houghton, Robert                             Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 171,818.69

Delaney,  Daniel                   Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               167,164.94

Moschella, Robert  F                           Patrolman                         Police Department               166,551.53

Addonizio,  Michael J                           Sergeant                          Police Department               165,570.61

Giancola,  Paul R                              Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 159,609.20

Krasco, William N                              Patrolman                         Police Department               159,422.55

Eaves, Paul                                      Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,387.51

Cameron, Robert  T                          Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,286.42

McGarry, Edward J                          Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,039.03

Masucci,  Michael  F                         Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 155,518.72

Conley, Scott                                      Patrolman                         Police Department               155,203.52

Purcell, Stephen M                 Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 153,053.03

Albanese, Leonard  A                          Fire Chief                          Fire Department                 152,062.60

Nelson, Edwin                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               151,547.85

McCue, Gerald A                           Director Exempt                      Business Office                  149,881.45

Thompson, Michael                   Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 147,058.30

Doherty, Paul W                      Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 146,525.98

Abell, Lyle Robert                              Patrolman                         Police Department               146,403.33

Denning,  Robert                      Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 146,005.01

Gurska,  Michael P                   Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 145,917.85

Brizuela,  William F                             Sergeant                          Police Department                I45,799.72

Carroccino, Richard                  Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 143,729.68

Noftle, John                                        Sergeant                          Police Department               143,399.35

D’alba, Anthony  F                               Sergeant                          Police Department               142,601.43

Rizzuto, David M                  Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,577.35

McLain, Thomas  H               Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,257.64

Dunn, Brlan A                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,075.70

Flibotte,  David A                                Sergeant                          Police Department               139,282.59

Breau, Linda                          Deputy/Asst. Superintendent       Curriculum & Instruction          138,723.52

Johari, Priti                                     Principal  220                    Chelsea High School              137,504.49

Betz, David K                       Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               136,752.02

Merritt,  Philips                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 135,078.38

Bevere  Maloney, Jacqueline             Principal  220                   Early Learning Center             134,399.98

Gonzalez,  Hector  L                             Sergeant                          Police Department               134,150.63

Tarraza,  Luis 0                                   Patrolman                         Police Department               132,435.96

Keefe, Edward P                         Deputy City Manager              City Managers Office             131,692.35

Ulwick, Wayne                                 Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 131,310.43

Lubarsky,  Adele                              Principal 220                     Edgar Hooks School              130,524.94

Ramirez,  Emilio                                Patrolman                         Police Department               130,435.94

Wilcox, Richard J                   Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 129,511.67

Nee, Michaela                                      Sergeant                          Police Department               129,262.60

Tiro, Anthony J                      Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 127,929.36

Lee, Michael W                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 127,554.60

Gobin, Rony R                         Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 126,838.72

Rogers, Philip R                       Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 126,715.84

Rosenberg, Cindy D                          Director/Sped                Special  Education  Office          126,704.50

Bower, John C                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               126,621.69

Lam,Longt                                         Patrolman                         Police Department               126,017.51

Torres, Jose                                        Firefighter                          Fire Department                 126,016.67

Grajal, Randy A                                   Teacher                         Edgar Hooks School              125,460.58

O’Brien, Joanne  M                             Patrolman                         Police Department               122.517.49

Bellomo,  Richard  R                           Patrolman                         Police Department               122,434.05

Barber.  Linda                       Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              122,340.06

Andreottola, Miguel                   Director- Admin Union           Information Technology           122,263.17

Martinello, Michelle                          Principal 220                   Eugene  Wright School            121,300.01

Schmidt,  Ronald L                Assistant  Principal 220 Days         Chelsea High School              120,863.05

Bevere, Joseph                                     Sergeant                          Police Department               120,723.24

DeleiDi, Adam  M                            Principal 220               William A Berkowitz School        119,725.05

Sanchez-Gleason, Magdalena             Principal 220                     George Kelly School              119,725.05

Chung, Starn                                      Patrolman                         Police Department               119,622.05

Fisher, Cheryl  W                             City Solicitor                       Law Department                 118,212.79

Kent, Sarah A                             Assistant  Super 220              Superintendent’s Office            118,180.01

Casucci,  Augustus  M                         Patrolman                         Police Department               118,042.21

Talbot, Michael                                Principal  220                   Clark Avenue  School             117,799.89

Noone, Michael J                                Patrolman                         Police Department               117,652.42

Sanchez, Miguel                    Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               117,208.79

Crowley, Kevin M                  Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 116,736.44

Griffin, Robert  E                 Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               116,607.77

Perisie, Rjchard                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 116,068.89

Almquist-Cevallos, Kristen L  Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              115,766.02

Cooney, Joseph F               Director Of Buildings & Grounds      Buildings & Grounds             115,378.83

Maldonado, Jonathan                           Patrolman                         Police Department               114,386.68

Valdes, Reinaldo                                 Firefighter                          Fire Department                 113,953.54

Dent, Sarah E                        Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              113,563.97

Rodriguez, Luis R                               Patrolman                         Police Department               113,325.68

Vazquez, Sylvia E                                Teacher                         George Kelly School              113,032.18

Ostler, Ryan P                                    Patrolman                         Police Department               112,945.35

Glass, Carter R                       Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,886.11

Conlon, Joseph                       Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,711.04

Stutto, Joseph C                                  Patrolman                         Police Department               112,582.33

Peters, Albert W                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,509.80

Griffin, Kevin M                   Assistant Principal 205 Days      Joseph A. Browne School          112,400.07

Shea. Julie C                                    Principal 220                 Joseph A. Browne School          112,196.08

Davis, Cove J                              Assistant Super 200               Superintendents Office            112,086.00

Meyers, Nathaniel S                          Principal 220               Frank M. Sokolowski School        111,946.05

Caissie, Arthur J                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 111,895.39

Taverna. Bertram                     Director Of Public Works                  Admin dpw                    111,811.66

Vega. Carlos J                                    Patrolman                         Police Department               111,585.26

Aliberti, Mark A                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 111,494.68

Lawlor, John W                      Lieutenant Fire Department               Fire Department                              111,374.27

Garcia, Stephen  Patrolman                         Police Department              111,132.25

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Driver Convicted of All Charges in Fatal 2016 Collision

Driver Convicted of All Charges in Fatal 2016 Collision

A Suffolk Superior Court jury Wednesday, May 30, convicted a drunk driver of killing 25-year-old Marco Salguero-Cruz in Chelsea and speeding away from the scene after a night of drinking at a Chelsea bar.

Jurors convicted Jose Daniel Arevalo, 35, of motor vehicle homicide while under the influence and leaving the scene of a collision causing death. He will be sentenced Thursday morning.

“Two years ago, the defendant made a choice that cost Marco Salguero-Cruz his life,” DA Dan Conley said. “Suffolk prosecutors, Chelsea detectives, and State troopers worked for untold hours on this case, first to identify the suspect, then to apprehend him, and finally to hold him accountable.  He fled the scene. He fled the country. But he could not flee from justice in a Suffolk County courtroom.”

Assistant District Attorney Michael V. Glennon proved at trial that Salguero-Cruz was struck by a silver Toyota Camry that left the scene on the night of June 4, 2016, in the area of Washington Street in Chelsea.  He died of his injuries at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Chelsea Police detectives and State troopers assigned to Conley’s office recovered images from cameras in the area that captured the vehicle’s path of travel as it exited the parking lot of a Washington Street bar at a high rate of speed, and later as it fled from the area of the crash.  Images captured prior to the crash depict the vehicle with two functioning headlights; footage captured immediately after the crash shows the vehicle with only one headlight working.

With the assistance of Conley’s Forensic Multimedia Lab and the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Digital Evidence Lab, previously-deleted footage from a private security camera was recovered and enhanced.

Conley’s office, Chelsea Police, and State Police released images depicting the driver to the media and the public, and a person familiar with Arevalo contacted investigators after recognizing him.  Investigators were also able to independently identify Arevalo through witness statements, social media, and Registry of Motor Vehicles records, prosecutors said.

Additional footage depicted Arevalo inside the Washington Street bar consuming four beers and six shots in approximately 2.5 hours leading up to the fatal crash, prosecutors said.

Arevalo allegedly fled to El Salvador two days after the crash but later returned to the United States and was taken into custody in Texas by Texas Rangers acting on a Massachusetts warrant obtained by Chelsea and State police.

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