Chelsea Fire Department Holds Successful Event at New Brown Jug Funds Will Go to New Firefighters Memorial

A large crowd attended the Chelsea Fire Department fundraiser Saturday night at the New Brown Jug.

Fire Captain Michael Thompson said the event helped the department reach its goal for the renovation project for the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial.

“We want to thank everybody for attending the fundraiser and making this event a big success,” said Thompson. “Many thanks to Michael Matrinko for being the gracious host that he was.”

Thompson also expressed his gratitude to Brian Greenhagen, owner of Mystic Brewery, for his generosity in hosting the April 6 CFD Chili-Off fundraiser at his establishment.

Event Organizer and CFD Captain Mike Thompson, New Brown Jug owner Mike Matrinko, and Event Chair and CFD Deputy Chief Mike Masucci at the Chelsea Fire Department fundraiser.

The Firefighters Memorial, located across the street from the Central Fire Station, was first erected in 1972. There had been no repairs at the site since that time.

Thompson served as a key organizer of the fundraiser. Deputy Fire Chief Mike Masucci was an organizer and a host of the event.

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Fire Department Works To Renovate Firefighters Memorial

Fire Department Works To Renovate Firefighters Memorial

The Chelsea Fire Department has begun a major renovation project for the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial that is situated outside the local fire alarm headquarters.

Chelsea Fire Capt. Michael Thompson points to the stone plate marking the original opening date of the memorial. The firefighters have launched a renovation project to restore the site.

Fire Captain Michael Thompson said the memorial was first erected in 1972 and there has been no refurbishing at the site since that time.

“Our goal is to revamp the entire site,” said Thompson, a 32-year veteran of the department. “We will erect granite walls with the names of our deceased firefighters.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino met with Deputy Chief Michael Masucci to discuss the project. Ambrosino gave the official go-ahead for the project.

Seeking to raise monies to defray the cost of the project, the firefighters will hold a “Chili Selloff” fundraiser this Saturday, April 6 at the Mystic Brewery, Chelsea.

“Bryan Greenhagan (owner of the brewery) has graciously invited us to sell chili from 1 to 9 p.m. on that day, with the proceeds going to the rebuilding of the memorial,” said Thompson.

Chris Flahive and his team of chefs from the Chelsea Yacht Club will team up with the firefighters to cook up 40 gallons of chili for the event.

On April 13 at the New Brown Jug, owner Michael Matrinko will host a fundraiser during which 20 percent of all food sales will go the firefighters memorial fund. There will be a raffle drawing for a $10,000 cash prize.

Every year on the first Sunday of June, the firefighters hold ceremonies at the site. Thompson is hopeful that the project will be completed by that date.

“I’m very excited to see this come to fruition,” said Thompson. “With the help of the citizens of Chelsea, we’re going to meet our goal and get it done.”

(Donations for the project can be sent to the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial Fund, P.O. 505616, Chelsea, MA 02150).

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Major Broadway Improvements Could Begin in 2022

Major Broadway Improvements Could Begin in 2022

A major $9.5 million improvement project for the one-mile stretch of Broadway from City Hall Avenue to the Revere line could get underway by the spring of 2022.

On Thursday, March 21, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation held a public hearing on the preliminary design plans for the roadway reconstruction. Although the state officials and engineers outnumbered the residents in attendance for the meeting, there was a good amount of information provided on the shape, scope, and timeline of the road reconstruction project.

“We are finishing the 25 percent design stage,” said Larry Cash, the MassDOT project manager. “After this hearing, we will be advancing to the final design stage.”

The purpose of the project is to increase safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, and vehicles along the Broadway corridor and intersecting streets in the city, according to Weston and Sampson engineer Larry Keegan. He said there will be new turn lanes, additional vehicle stacking room, and traffic signals at the project intersections allowing for the safer turning of vehicles and improved safety for pedestrians and bicyclists. The plans also include dedicated bicycle lanes through the one-mile stretch.

“There have been 97 collisions over a three-year period” along that portion of Broadway,” said Keegan. “That is above the state average.”

Keegan pointed to poor intersection layout, outdated traffic signals, and deficient pedestrian, bicycle, and public transit accommodations as being among the chief culprits for the high number of accidents. All of those issues will be addressed during the roadway reconstruction, he said.

In addition to the repaving of the road itself, a major component of the work includes new sidewalks and improved drainage.

Sidewalk improvements will mean the removal of some trees.

“The existing trees are old and unhealthy, lifting up the sidewalks themselves so that they are not ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliant,” said Keegan.

Other areas that will get major upgrades are the MBTA bus stops along the route. Keegan noted that there is deterioration of pavement and pavement markings from years of use along the mile of Broadway, and that the deterioration is especially pronounced at the bus stops.

The proposed project will require permanent and temporary easements from adjacent property owners, but Cash said those easements are either temporary to allow for construction work along the road, or are for the installation or minor regrading of sidewalks.

As with any project that involves ripping up pavement and sidewalks to make way for improvements, there will be traffic and construction impacts once work gets underway.

But Keegan said the plan is to keep disruptions to a minimum and traffic flowing as easily as possible.

“No detours are anticipated at this time,” he said.

During the day, the plan is to have a single lane of traffic closed and have the traffic managed by police. At night, there will be two-way traffic, according to Keegan. Access to schools, businesses, and residences will be kept open as much as possible, he added.

Chelsea resident John Gunning asked if the bus stops would remain in the current locations and if there would be improvements to the bus shelters.

Keegan said engineers will be working with the MBTA during the next phase of design to address some of those issues.

“The T wants certain things and the city wants certain things (for the bus stops),” he said. “We are looking at different options at this point.”

Dunning said he would like to see fresh, new bus shelters and stops that will complement the surrounding area and completed improvements.

Cash said design, permitting, and right of way acquisition for the project will continue through 2019 and 2020 with construction anticipated to start in the spring of 2022.

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Top 100

Top 100

The City released the 2018 payroll figures for the City of Chelsea this week. The top earner was once again Chief Brian Kyes at $230,344, as per his recent contract. For the police earners, much of the gross salary listed also include detail pay, the vast majority of which does not come from City funds. Of the Top 10 highest paid, eight were from the Police or Fire Departments. City Manager Tom Ambrosino checked in at number 10, making $180,441.

NAME TITLE EARNINGS

Brian Kyes Chief of Police $230,344.33

Joseph Fern Sergeant $211,872.46

Thomas Dunn Captain Police Dept. $205,872.85

Waynen Ulwick Deputy Chief $203,288.67

Keith Houghton Captain Police Dept. $197,453.50

David Batchelor Captain Police Dept. $194678.46

John Quatieri Deputy Chief $183,497.21

Mary Bourque Superintendent 225 $182,148.98

Robert Houghton Deputy Chief $182,019.22

Thomas Ambrosino City Mgr. $180,441.72

Hector Gonzalez Sergeant $176,440.18

Michael Thompson Captain Fire Dept. $166,379.54

Michael Masucci Deputy Chief $166,189.31

Paul Giancola Deputy Chief $166,978.20

Edwin Nelson Lt. Police Dept. $164,488.50

Michael Addonizio Sergeant $162.911.18

Edward McGarry Deputy Chief $161,706.80

David Flibotte Sergeant $160,531.80

Rony Gobin Capt. Fire Dept. $158,983.82

John Noftle Sergeant $156,654.04

Robert Denning Capt. Fire Dept. $156,582.07

Leonard Albanese Fire Chief $156,436.80

Paul Doherty Capt. Fire Dept. $156,210.97

William Dana Capt. Police Dept. $155,886.74

Daniel Delaney Lt. Police Dept. $153,015.37

William Briquela Sergeant $151,980.26

Stephen Purcell Capt. Fire Dept. $151,220.30

Michael Gurska Capt. Fire Dept. $150,926.52

David Betz Lt. Police Dept. $149,452.67

Scott Conley Patrolman $148,971.14

William Krasco Patrolman $148,129.25

Thomas McLain Patrolman $147,994.81

Brian Dunn Lt. Police Dept. $146,432.04

Richard Wilcox Lt. Fire Dept. $146,159.30

Lyle Abell Patrolman $145,456.77

Robert Moschella Patrolman $144,743.05

Linda Breau Dep/Asst. Superintendent $144,048.58

Anthony D’Alba Sergeant $143,491.93

Richard Carroccino Capt. Fire Dept. $142,271.06

Robert Cameron Deputy Chief $141,745.95

Priti Johari Asst. Super 225 $141,549.97

Philip Rogers Capt. Fire Dept. $141,486.55

Nicole McLaughlin Patrolman $138,758.46

Gerald McCue Director Exempt $138,498.37

Jacqueline Maloney Principal 220 $138,370.05

Michael Lee Capt. Fire Dept. $137,816.45

David Rizzuto Lt. Police Dept. $135,789.24

Edward Keefe Deputy City Mgr. $134,355.42

Richard Perisie Deputy Chief $133,742.54

Jon Maldonado Patrolman $133,573.84

Angelica Guerra Patrolman $133,489.66

Adele Lubarsky Principal 220 $133,299.92

Philip Merritt Capt. Fire Dept. $133,167.89

Sarah Kent Asst. Super 220 $132,598.96

Randy Grajal Teacher $132,365.77

Anthony Tiro Lt. Fire Dept. $129,619.11

Cindy Rosenberg Director/SPED $129,238.46

John Bower Lt. Police Dept. $129,087.69

Michael Villanueva Patrolman $128,705.88

Michael Nee Sergeant $128,519.44

Ronald Schmidt Principal 220 $128,419.34

Stephen Garcia Patrolman $128,106.06

Joseph Capistran Patrolman $128,032.49

Garrison Daniel Patrolman $127,915.71

Linda Barber Asst. Principal $127,803.92

Gary Poulin Firefighter $127,245.49

Sylvia Vazquez Teacher $126,762.71

Joseph Stutto Patrolman $126,042.52

Mark Martineau Asst. Principal $125,942.86

David Bishop Lt. Fire Dept. $125,542.09

Michelle Martinello Principal 220 $125,500.04

Christian Lehmann Lt. Fire Dept. $125,163.61

Jose Torres Firefighter $124,622.98

Joanne O’Brien Patrolman $124,618.74

Michael Noone Patrolman $124,616.70

Richard Bellomo Patrolman $124,592.28

Michael Talbot Principal 200 $123,749.98

Mark Aliberti Lt. Fire Dept. $123,739.98

Augustus Casucci Patrolman $123,288.79

Cheryl Fisher City Solicitor $122,859.54

Adam Deleidi Principal 220 $122,500.04

Paul McCarthy Patrolman $121,779.06

Paul Marchese Patrolman $121,317.29

Star Chung Patrolman $121,169.07

Joseph Cooney Dir. Of Blgds/Grounds $121,153.88

Julie Shea Principal 220 $120,750.11

Nathaniel Meyers Principal 220 $120,500.05

Christopher Troisi Patrolman $120,363.74

Daniel Dejordy Lt. Fire Dept. $120,334.37

Long Lam Patrolman $118,106.45

Carlos Vega Patrolman $117,787.32

Joan Sullivan Director Exempt $117,584.55

Bertram Taverna Dir. Of Public Works $117,344.83

Juan Sanchez Patrolman $117,235.48

Alan Beausoleil Coordinator $116,774.31

John Coen Sergeant $116,114.05

David Batchelor Patrolman $116,023.49

Robert Brown Capt. Fire Dept. $115,978.37 Damon Peykar Coordinator $115,667.73

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Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

A Lynn teen, who was originally from Chelsea, pleaded guilty March 7 as his trial was set to begin on charges that he opened fire during a party three years ago, killing 19-year-old Pablo Villeda and injuring six others.

Emanuel Marrero, 19, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in connection with Pablo Villeda’s March 6, 2016, shooting death, as well as six counts of armed assault with intent to murder and related charges for injuries suffered by six other young people.

Pablo Villeda was killed in an early morning teen party on March 6, 2016 held at a vacant apartment on Washington Avenue. On Thursday, March 7, Emanuel Marrero pleaded guilty in court to his murder.

Judge Linda Giles imposed the mandatory sentence of life in prison, ordering that he be eligible for parole after 15 years and that his sentences on the non-fatal shootings be served concurrently. Had he chosen to go to trial, the defendant – who was 16 at the time of the homicide – would have faced a first-degree murder charge.

“We accepted this plea because it delivers a significant measure of accountability for the defendant’s actions, which took Pablo’s life just as it was ready to begin,” District Attorney Rachael Rollins said. “It also considers all the potential outcomes at trial and on appeal, as well as the defendant’s age at the time of the homicide. Nothing we do can bring Pablo Villeda back to his loving family, but I hope this final result can at least provide them with closure to this tragic event.”

Chief Brian Kyes said he hopes the prison sentence will bring closure to the family on what was a tragic night in Chelsea three years ago.

“This was certainly a tragic night for everyone involved and one that none of us will soon forget,” said Kyes. “We truly hope that the imposition of this prison sentence by the Suffolk County Superior Court will bring some sense of solace to the family of Pablo Villeda that they absolutely deserve. Senseless acts of violence like this have no place in our neighborhoods and we will continue to work with our community partners to prevent tragedies like this from ever occurring again.”

Chelsea Police responded to 120 Washington Ave. in the early morning hours of March 6, 2016, for multiple calls reporting a disturbance at a party held inside a vacant apartment. They arrived to find seven people, ranging in age from 15 to 22, suffering gunshot wounds. Pablo was rushed to the hospital but succumbed to his injuries; the surviving victims were treated at Whidden Memorial Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Assistant District Attorney Julie Higgins of the DA’s Homicide Unit was prepared to introduce evidence and testimony showing that the defendant brought a .40 caliber handgun to the party, flaunting it to several other attendees. At some point, the evidence would have shown, the defendant confronted the victim and opened fire. Pablo was mortally wounded and six other people were struck, and fortunately survived their injuries. The defendant fled the scene but was identified in the course of an exhaustive investigation by Chelsea Police detectives and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit. The defendant was represented by attorney Richard Chambers

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Clark Avenue Middle to be Named After Legendary Morrie Siegel

Clark Avenue Middle to be Named After Legendary Morrie Siegel

By Seth Daniel and Laura Plummer

The City Council and the School Committee have voted to name the new Clark Avenue Middle School after long-time School Committeeman and former Williams School Principal Morris ‘Morrie’ Seigel.

At Monday night’s City Council meeting, the matter was brought up for a vote on a request forwarded from the School Committee – who had voted to approve the move.

The late Morrie Seigel pictured here in May 2013 when he served as the Chief Marshal of the Memorial Day Girl Scout Parade. The new Clark Avenue Middle School has been named after him.

The Council voted unanimously on the proposal by City Manager Thomas Ambrosino to dedicate the Clark Avenue Middle School to the late educator and community member. It will now be known as the Morris H. Seigel Clark Avenue Middle School.

City Council members spoke fondly about Seigal.

“Mr. Seigal was not only a wonderful person for the city of Chelsea, he was a great gentleman,” said Councilman Calvin Brown. “When he wasn’t in his professional attire, he had his Chelsea jacket on, his Chelsea hat on, displaying his pride.”

Said Councillor Giovanni Recupero, “There’s only one [way] to describe Mr. Seigal–great person. If anyone deserves this, it’s Mr. Seigal. He was the teacher of my kids for many years. For 40 years, I knew the gentleman and he was a very nice person.”

Seigel was an educator in the City and served as the principal of the Williams School. He was a School Committeeman for 29 years, and a youth leader at the Chelsea YMHA.

In 2013, as a noted veteran, he was the Chief Marshal of the Memorial Day Girl Scout Parade.

He passed away in October 2013.

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Chelsea Rehabs Its City Seal

Chelsea Rehabs Its City Seal

So much happens within every municipality that needs to be shared: upcoming events, new initiatives, important updates, celebrations of success.  And there’s myriad ways in which each department of City Hall interfaces with the public in routine ways, from applications for parking permits to business licenses, to simple correspondence to the uniforms of Department of Public Work employees  repairing the streets. Inherent in all of this communication is a message about how the municipality functions. Each represents an opportunity to say something about the City of Chelsea itself. 

The new Chelsea City Seal features a more appropriate figure and a consistent design.

To make the most of these opportunities, the City of Chelsea has just released a Style Guide that details the specific graphic style for all communications from the ten City Hall departments and nearly twenty boards and commissions. The goal of the effort is to establish a consistent brand identity that’s professional, clear, and attractive. The guide details typography, colors, photography and formatting that together create a distinctive look for City Hall’s print and digital materials. For administrative staff at City Hall, a suite of templates facilitate the quick creation of regularly needed materials within the established style. The refreshed documents include letterhead and envelopes, agendas and minutes, business cards and brochures, forms and flyers, reports and PowerPoint slide decks.

The underlying goal of the project is that quality, consistent design will demonstrate a unified voice whenever expressed by an agent of Chelsea’s city offices. Quality design demonstrates competence and professionalism. Through a clear graphic identity the public will be able to better recognize services provided by municipal government.

Over the past eight months, a team of City Hall staff representing a variety of departments worked with design consultant, Catherine Headen, to develop the guide. After reviews, working sessions and a special event with City Hall staff the completed Guide and templates are formally released this week.

A major aspect of the work was refining of the City Seal. Over the decades numerous changes had led to an evolution of the design, drifting the illustration away from the original as detailed in the banner hanging Chelsea’s City Council Chambers. When the team began, nearly a dozen different images were in use as a City Seal across municipal departments. The design details had changed so significantly that the group was surprised to discover lost elements prescribed within the City Charter: “The following shall be the device of the corporate seal of the city: A representation within a circle of a shield surmounted by a star, the shield bearing upon it the representation of an American Indian chief and wigwams; at the right of the shield, a sailboat such as was formerly used for ferriage; at the left of the shield, a view of the city and a steam ferryboat; under the shield, the word “Winnisimmet;” around the shield, the words “Chelsea, settled 1624; a Town 1739; a City 1857.”

The unveiling of the new look with take place over time. City staff will continue to use the print materials already on hand but will use the new templates for all their future materials. The new style is intended for the main City Hall departments and doesn’t extend to the City’s Police and Fire departments or to the schools.

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Fire at Pollo Campero treacherous, but controlled quickly

Fire at Pollo Campero  treacherous, but controlled quickly

A Chelsea firefighter fighting the stunning blaze created by Pollo Campero in Park Square on Sunday
night. The popular restaurant was a total loss, but owners said they intend to re-build.

Heavy smoke poured from the popular Pollo Campero restaurant in Park Square on Sunday night, with firefighters facing treacherous conditions that forced their evacuation numerous times as they tried to put out the stunning fire.

In the end, crews battled and made quick work of it – getting it out within an hour.

Chief Len Albanese said it is still under investigation this week, and that it was a total loss.

“The fire is still under investigation; however, I can report at this time that it appears that the fire started in a concealed space within a wall, then traveled to the loft space above the ceiling where the fire was allowed to burn for some time before breaking out and activating the Fire Alarm system,” he said. “This would account for the major fire condition on arrival even though the building had a working fire alarm system. Also, there were no sprinklers within the structure. The fire remains under investigation for a definitive cause that will be reported upon completion.”

There were no civilian injuries, but one firefighter was injured.

On Sunday evening, at 11:40 p.m. Chelsea Fire Alarm received an alarm of fire from Box 1134 for the Pollo Campero restaurant located at 115 Park St. First arriving companies from Chelsea E2 and L1 under the command of Capt. Phil Rogers reported heavy smoke showing on arrival from the rear of the building. C4 Deputy Wayne Ulwick arrived on scene assuming command and immediately ordered the Working Fire. Due to the heavy smoke and reports of heavy fire within the interior of the building, a Second Alarm was requested bringing companies from Revere, Everett, Boston and MassPort to the scene. Crews were ordered out of the building several times due to conditions rapidly deteriorating from heavy fire conditions within the structure forcing firefighters to attack the fire with defensive operations using blitz guns, hand lines and ladder pipes

The fire was brought under control within an hour.

The Boston Sparks Club under the command of President Paul Boudreau responded to the scene supplying Re-Hab and refreshments for the firefighters. Chelsea Police also provided traffic and crowd control during fire. Crews from Medford and Boston provided mutual aid during the fire.

Chief Albanese said it was a defensive fight for firefighters because the structure was too far along to be saved. Nevertheless, owners are determined to rebuild. “It was determined that the fire was well involved within the structure, and crews were ordered out of the building and proceeded with a defensive fire attack,” he said. “Given the time of day, a closed business and no reports of occupants, this was the safest course of action given that very early on it was apparent that this building could not be saved. Members of Fire Prevention are working with the ownership, who reported to us that they intend to rebuild as soon as possible.”

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110 Grill Holds Ribbon Cutting at Its New Location in Saugus

110 Grill Holds Ribbon Cutting at Its New Location in Saugus

Ryan Dion has fond memories of his days growing up in Melrose and traveling to Route 1 to enjoy a steak at the Hilltop.

“Route 1 is my old stomping ground,” said Dion, who graduated from Melrose High (Class of 1999) and UNH with a degree in Business and Hospitality. “The old Hilltop was family dinner most Saturday nights. I remember waiting two hours for seating in Sioux City, Kansas City, and Dodge City. I use to run around the old phone booths with my brothers.”

Dion is now the chief operating officer of 110 Grill, which just celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting ceremony at its newest location on Route 1 in Saugus.

The 110 Grill in Saugus is the restaurant group’s 18th location and it sits majestically on the former site of the legendary Hilltop Steakhouse. The ribbon-cutting ceremony featured the lighting of the iconic Hilltop cactus.

Asked to describe 110 Grill, Dion replied, “110 Grill is upscale, casual, American cuisine in a trendy, casual atmosphere.”

110 Grill features steaks, seafood, a variety of sandwiches, salads, and appetizers, as well as monthly rotating specials that the chefs create.

Appetizers range from $7 to $15. Entrees range from $14 to $30.

Why have the 110 Grill restaurants – now in three states (Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New York) proven to be so popular with diners?

“I believe it’s three things – great food, great service, and the great ambiance,” said Dion. “What I love about our concept is being upscale casual, you can come in here in a business suit and have a $32 ribeye and a bottle of Duckhorn Cabernet, or you come in shorts and sandals from the beach, sit at the bar and have a burger and a beer. Either way, you fit in.”

The restaurants seats 155 persons, with a private function room available for lunch, dinner, and cocktail receptions.

“We’re absolutely excited to get to know the local folks,” said Dion. “We have a great crew working here from Saugus, Melrose, Revere, Lynn, and other area communities.”

110 Grill appears destined to be a huge hit on the local restaurant scene.

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Police Briefs 01-17-2019

Police Briefs 01-17-2019

ARMED ROBBERY OF CAR

On Dec. 31, at 10 p.m., officers were dispatched to 144 Bloomingdale St. for a report of a past armed robbery. Upon arrival, Officers spoke to the victim who stated while driving his car he was cut off by a vehicle on Bloomingdale St. He told officers that the two males exited the sedan and approached him saying that he had just struck their car.

The passengers of the suspect’s car then proceeded to rob him of his wallet and its contents. A short time later, the officers received information on the whereabouts of the suspect vehicle and stopped it. The victim was able to identify the two males in the car as the persons that robbed him. Both were taken into custody.

Rigoberto Ruiz-Cadiz, 22, of 146 Bloomingdale St.; and Efrain Alicea, 22, of 64 Addison St., were both charged with armed robbery.

NEW YEAR’S (WINDOW) BASH

On Jan. 1, at 11:30 a.m., CPD officers responded to 140 Shawmut St. for a report of an intoxicated male party that had destroyed a window to a residence. Upon arrival, a witness pointed out the male individual who caused the damage. He was placed under arrest for malicious destruction of property.

Ernesto Bonilla, 18, of East Boston, was charged with malicious destruction of property under $1,200.

TRIED TO USE A STOLEN CREDIT CARD

On Jan. 3, at 6:50 p.m., CPD officers responded to the Homewood Suites Inn for a report of a male party attempting to use a stolen credit card. At the hotel, the officers spoke with a hotel employee, who stated that the suspect just fled the hotel after he tried to pay for a room with a stolen credit card. A short time later, the same male was attempting to secure a room at the Residence Inn with another stolen credit card. He was placed under arrest.

Andy Joseph, 34, of 1 Webster Ave., was charged with unlicensed operation, possession of an open container in a motor vehicle, larceny of a credit card, and two counts of uttering/forging a credit card.

PUBLIC DRINKING

On Jan. 5, at 10:55 a.m., a CPD officer on foot was patrolling Luther Place. The officer observed a male party in the area behind 466 Broadway drinking out of a bottle of liquor. The male was placed under arrest drinking in public.

Jose Martinez, 56, of East Boston, was charged with violating the public drinking ordinance.

DA ROLLINS CHOOSES CHIEF OF STAFF

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins announced last week that Jennifer Grace Miller will be her Chief of Staff, citing Miller’s broad experience in senior government positions, including stints at two statewide law enforcement agencies.

Miller’s first day will be Feb. 1, 2019.

Miller has most recently served as Counsel to the Massachusetts Senate, where she was the chief legal counsel to 40 senators and approximately 200 staff members. Prior to joining the Senate, Miller was Chief of the Government Bureau in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s office. As Chief, Miller supervised roughly 100 lawyers and staff in three divisions. She previously served as the Bureau’s Deputy Chief and as an assistant attorney general in the Administrative Law Division, focusing primarily on civil appellate work. Among other high-profile litigation, Miller argued the Massachusetts buffer zone case,McCullen v. Coakley, at the United States Supreme Court.

Miller began her public service career as Senior Staff Counsel at the Supreme Judicial Court. She then served as Assistant Solicitor General in the New York Attorney General’s office.

“Jennifer Grace Miller is a smart, dedicated public servant with deep experience managing complex government institutions and sophisticated litigation,” District Attorney Rollins said. “She has worked in all three branches of government and will bring a trusted set of skills and perspective to the District Attorney’s office.”

She also serves as a Commissioner on the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission.

Police Log

Monday, 12/31

Dilcia Menjivar, 31, 39 Lawton Ave., Lynn, was arrested for intimidation.

Rigoberto Ruiz-Cadiz, 22, 146 Bloomingdale St., Chelsea, was arrested for armed robbery.

Efrain Alicea, 22, 64 Addison St., Chelsea, was arrested for armed robbery.

Tuesday, 1/1

Ernesto Bonilla, 18, 155 Lexington St., East Boston, was arrested for malicious destruction of property.

Julio Portillo, 52, Pine Street Inn, Boston, was arrested for resisting arrest and on a warrant.

Wednesday, 1/2

Yancarlos Mejia-Gonzalez, 31, 72 Upham St., Malden, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended license, failing to stop for police, red light violation and immigration detainer.

Darnell Booth, 37, 560 Beach St., Revere, was arrested for probation warrant.

Carlos Ramos, 51, 27 Watts St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed.

Thursday, 1 /3

John Lewis, 34, 292 Salem St., Revere, was arrested on a warrant.

Andy Joseph, 34, 1 Webster Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed, possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle, larceny of credit card, utter forged credit card (2 counts).

Saturday, 1/5

Jose Martinez, 56, 264 Bennington St., East Boston, was arrested for ordinance violation of alcoholic beverage, marijuana/THC.

Faisal Yerow, 23, 120 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for probation warrant.

Sunday, 1/6 Quincy Parker, 42, 90 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

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