National Night Out In Chelsea

Several organizations joined Chief Brian Kyes and the Chelsea Police Department for the celebration, including members of the second class of the Chelsea Youth Police Academy gather for a group picture.
Residents of Chelsea since 1984, Rene Thomson and her husband, Joseph Fuches, are impressed with how Chelsea has grown has a city. They were just a few of the residents who came out to Mary O’Malley Park on Tuesday night, Aug. 6, for the annual National Night Out celebration.

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Getto Young to Receive Top National Award : Chief of Staff to Sen. DiDomenico Is First Person in Mass. To Be Accorded This Honor

Special to The Independent

Senate Assistant Majority Leader Sal DiDomenico and his team are proud to announce that Christie Getto Young, chief of staff to Sen. DiDomenico, is the 2019 recipient of the National Conference of State Legislature (NCSL) Legislative Staff Achievement Award.

This national award is given annually by the NCSL Leadership Staff Professional Association and was created to recognize an individual who demonstrates excellence in support of the work of a state legislature and strengthening of legislative institutions.
Getto Young is the first staff member from the Massachusetts Legislature to ever receive this top national award, and she will be honored at the 2019 National Conference of State Legislature Summit in Nashville on August 4-5.

“Christie truly deserves this award, and I am excited that others around the country will see what we already know in our office and in the Senate – Christie is a leader who others look up and she is a huge asset for the Legislature. Not only are we fortunate to have her as our Chief of Staff, but the residents of my district and the Commonwealth are the beneficiaries of her passion and dedication to serve,” said Sen. DiDomenico. “We look forward to joining her in Nashville as she receives this well-deserved recognition for being the best in her field. I am very proud of Christie, and she is a friend, advisor, trusted colleague and partner who I rely on and have had the honor of working with since our first days in the Senate. Christie has an impressive record of accomplishments throughout her career, and she has built strong relationships inside and outside the State House. I am thrilled that she will be given this national Legislative Staff Achievement Award because Christie is a kind and compassionate person who is a fierce advocate for those who need our help the most. This is the Christie Getto Young we all know, and I am pleased that others on the national stage get to see this as well.”

For nearly a decade, Getto Young has been a steadfast leader in the Massachusetts Senate and a key resource for legislative staff, non-profit organizations, and advocates working to pursue policies that support our Commonwealth’s children and families. Christie was nominated by Sen. DiDomenico and her colleagues in light of her many accomplishments. From writing legislation to protect human service workers, promoting education equity, working to repeal devastating policy decisions made decades ago that hurt vulnerable families, and spearheading a multi-year Senate initiative known as Kids First to take a holistic approach to the way our Commonwealth supports children and families Christie has helped contribute to the well-being of hundreds of residents who will never know her face or name, but they can be sure that there was someone advocating for them and making lives a little better for themselves and their families.

“Everyone, from constituents to her Senate colleagues to the children and families she has advocated for, has a reason to be grateful that Christie has chosen to dedicate her life to public service,” said Senate President Karen Spilka. “Christie’s combination of professionalism and kindness make her a natural leader, and she has served as a role model for many staff members in the Senate. On behalf of the entire Massachusetts State Senate, I wish to congratulate Christie Getto Young for this very well deserved award.”

In her nomination letter, Christie’s Senate colleagues wrote “while Christie’s list of legislative accomplishments are impressive her greatest career achievement is the long-lasting impact and influence that she had on young staffers, especially female staffers. Christie has not only inspired dozens of young people to pursue careers in public policy, she has become a mentor to many in the Massachusetts Legislature.”

Christie Getto Young has worked in the Massachusetts Legislature for a total of 11 years. Her career in public service began working as a Research Analyst for the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Human Services from 1993-1995. After pursuing a career in the nonprofit sector, serving as Senior Director of Public Policy at United Way of Massachusetts Bay, Christie returned to the Legislature in 2010 working for Massachusetts Sen. Sal DiDomenico, first as his Budget & Policy Director and eventually becoming his Chief of Staff in 2013.

Getto Young has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Kenyon College in Ohio, Masters in Social Work from Boston College, and a Juris Doctor degree from Northeastern University in Boston.

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Fire Officials Urge the Public to Leave the Fireworks to the Professionals

“Last year, several people lost fingers and suffered serious burns lighting off illegal fireworks in Massachusetts,” said State Fire Marshal Peter J. Ostroskey. “Thirty-four firefighters were injured when an errant firework ignited a six-family building. Have a fun but safe Fourth of July and leave the fireworks to the professionals,” he added.

Fourth of July No Holiday for Firefighters

Needham Fire Chief Dennis Condon, president of the Fire Chiefs’ Association of Massachusetts, said, “The Fourth of July holiday is a busy time for firefighters. We are supervising the professional displays so that they are safe for spectators and licensed operators; we are busy responding to all types of fires and medical emergencies. In fact, the week of July Fourth is one of the busiest times of the year for fires.”

State Fire Marshal Peter J. Ostroskey said, “This year, set a good example for your children. Just as children know where you keep the matches and lighters, they know where you stash your illegal fireworks.” He added, “Children imitate adults. If you use fireworks, children will copy you, not realizing how very dangerous fireworks are.”

Fireworks Cause Many Dangerous Fires

Last summer, there were many fires, amputations and burn injuries from illegal fireworks in Massachusetts. In the past decade (2009-2018), there have been 800 major fires and explosions involving illegal fireworks in Massachusetts[1]. These incidents resulted in 12 civilian injuries, 39 fire service injuries and an estimated dollar loss of $2.5 million.

· On June 25, 2018, people shooting fireworks in the street started a fire in a six-unit Lynn apartment building. One ricocheted to the second floor porch and ignited several items. The fire spread to the rest of the second floor and to the third. Thirty-four firefighters were injured at this fire.

· On July 2, 2018, the Worcester Fire Department was called to a fire in a three-unit apartment building. The fire was started by fireworks igniting trash in a first floor doorway.

· On July 3, 2018, Dartmouth District #1 responded to a pier fire at Anthony’s Beach. Crews discovered remains of many fireworks on and around the pier after the fire was extinguished.

· On July 4, 2018, the Agawam Fire Department responded to a brush fire started by three juveniles who were using illegal fireworks.

· On July 5, 2018, the Lynn Fire Department put out a car fire started by fireworks.

Fireworks Injuries

In the past decade (2009-2018), 38 people were treated at Massachusetts emergency rooms for severe burn injuries from fireworks (burns covering 5 percent of more of the body) according to the Massachusetts Burn Injury Reporting System (M-BIRS). Fifty-five percent of the victims were under age 25. Eighteen percent (18 percent) were between the ages of 15 and 24; 8 percent were between the ages of 10 and 14; 18 percent were between five and nine; and 11 percent were children under five. The youngest victim was a six-month old boy. These victims are scarred for life. In the past year:

· A 22-year-old man was seriously injured when roman candles were set off inside an Amherst apartment.

· A 22-year-old was injured in Gloucester playing with sparklers.

· A 10-year-old boy was injured by illegal fireworks at a Marshfield beach on July 3, 2018. He was an innocent by-stander.

· A man lost part of his hand when a firework he was holding exploded. The explosion occurred in a Mansfield MBTA parking lot.

· The Tewksbury Fire Department provided emergency medical care to a man who lost a part of every finger on his right hand when a firework he was holding exploded.

· A 25-year-old Brockton man suffered injuries to his left hand when a “cherry bomb” exploded.

· A 22-year-old Kingston man suffered injuries to his hands, face and stomach from a firework.

All Fireworks Are Illegal in Massachusetts

The possession and use of all fireworks by private citizens is illegal in Massachusetts. This includes Class C fireworks, which are sometimes falsely called “safe and sane” fireworks. Class C fireworks include sparklers, party poppers, snappers, firecrackers, spinners, cherry bombs and more. Sparklers burn at 1,800ºF or higher. It is illegal to transport fireworks into Massachusetts, even if they were purchased legally elsewhere. Illegal fireworks can be confiscated on the spot.

For more information on the dangers of fireworks, go to the Department of Fire Services webpage Leave the Fireworks to the Professionals.

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Two Finalists Vying For Massport CEO Job

The Massport Board of Directors announced that Boston Planning and Development head Brian Golden and Massport’s Port Director Lisa Weiland have emerged as the two finalists who will be considered for the Massport CEO post.

The Massport board will meet during a special meeting Thursday and make its final decision on whether it will be Golden or Weiland for the $300,000 a year job that will oversee Logan International Airport and the Conley Shipping Terminal in Southie.

After a nation-wide search that included 170 applicants for the job the Massport board cut the list down to 40, then 10, then four before Golden and Weiland emerged.

“I want to hear three things from the two candidates; their vision, how familiar and experienced they are in working the levers of local and federal government, and maybe most importantly, what experience they have working with local impacted neighborhoods,“ said Massport board member and Eastie resident John Nucci. “Those were former CEO Thomas Glynn’s strengths and it’s what we need again right now.”

In 2016 the Massport board voted to promote Weiland from Acting Port Director to Port Director.

Wieland has served as the Acting Port Director since March of 2015 and previously as Maritime’s Chief Administrative Officer. As Port Director, she oversees planning, development, marketing, operations, security, financial management, administration and maintenance of all of Massport’s non-aviation properties. Before joining the Maritime team, Wieland served in several roles at Massport, including the Director of HR Strategy and Employment and the Director of Corporate Planning and Analysis. Wieland has been with Massport since 2006.

Prior to her employment with Massport, Wieland worked as a consultant for Bain & Company serving health care and consumer products clients, and for CNN in various news and political assignments. She received her B.A. from UCLA in Political Science, and her M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School.

As BPDA Director since 2014, Golden functions as the BPDA’s chief executive. He oversees the agency’s core missions of community-engaged planning, regulation of major real estate development, management of the BPDA’s real property, and workforce training programs.

An attorney since 1993, Golden is a former member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, where he served the Allston-Brighton neighborhood of Boston. He was also the New England Regional Director at the US Department of Health and Human Services, a Commissioner at the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Energy, and a member of the Board of Directors at the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston.

Golden has served as a U.S. Army officer, active duty and reserve, for more than twenty years. His military experience included duty in Bosnia, Iraq, and Israel/West Bank.

Golden is a graduate of the Boston Latin School and Harvard College. He received a Master’s degree from the U.S. Army War College and a law degree from the College of William and Mary’s School of Law.

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Chelsea Fire Department Holds Successful Event at New Brown Jug Funds Will Go to New Firefighters Memorial

A large crowd attended the Chelsea Fire Department fundraiser Saturday night at the New Brown Jug.

Fire Captain Michael Thompson said the event helped the department reach its goal for the renovation project for the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial.

“We want to thank everybody for attending the fundraiser and making this event a big success,” said Thompson. “Many thanks to Michael Matrinko for being the gracious host that he was.”

Thompson also expressed his gratitude to Brian Greenhagen, owner of Mystic Brewery, for his generosity in hosting the April 6 CFD Chili-Off fundraiser at his establishment.

Event Organizer and CFD Captain Mike Thompson, New Brown Jug owner Mike Matrinko, and Event Chair and CFD Deputy Chief Mike Masucci at the Chelsea Fire Department fundraiser.

The Firefighters Memorial, located across the street from the Central Fire Station, was first erected in 1972. There had been no repairs at the site since that time.

Thompson served as a key organizer of the fundraiser. Deputy Fire Chief Mike Masucci was an organizer and a host of the event.

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Fire Department Works To Renovate Firefighters Memorial

Fire Department Works To Renovate Firefighters Memorial

The Chelsea Fire Department has begun a major renovation project for the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial that is situated outside the local fire alarm headquarters.

Chelsea Fire Capt. Michael Thompson points to the stone plate marking the original opening date of the memorial. The firefighters have launched a renovation project to restore the site.

Fire Captain Michael Thompson said the memorial was first erected in 1972 and there has been no refurbishing at the site since that time.

“Our goal is to revamp the entire site,” said Thompson, a 32-year veteran of the department. “We will erect granite walls with the names of our deceased firefighters.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino met with Deputy Chief Michael Masucci to discuss the project. Ambrosino gave the official go-ahead for the project.

Seeking to raise monies to defray the cost of the project, the firefighters will hold a “Chili Selloff” fundraiser this Saturday, April 6 at the Mystic Brewery, Chelsea.

“Bryan Greenhagan (owner of the brewery) has graciously invited us to sell chili from 1 to 9 p.m. on that day, with the proceeds going to the rebuilding of the memorial,” said Thompson.

Chris Flahive and his team of chefs from the Chelsea Yacht Club will team up with the firefighters to cook up 40 gallons of chili for the event.

On April 13 at the New Brown Jug, owner Michael Matrinko will host a fundraiser during which 20 percent of all food sales will go the firefighters memorial fund. There will be a raffle drawing for a $10,000 cash prize.

Every year on the first Sunday of June, the firefighters hold ceremonies at the site. Thompson is hopeful that the project will be completed by that date.

“I’m very excited to see this come to fruition,” said Thompson. “With the help of the citizens of Chelsea, we’re going to meet our goal and get it done.”

(Donations for the project can be sent to the Chelsea Firefighters Memorial Fund, P.O. 505616, Chelsea, MA 02150).

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Major Broadway Improvements Could Begin in 2022

Major Broadway Improvements Could Begin in 2022

A major $9.5 million improvement project for the one-mile stretch of Broadway from City Hall Avenue to the Revere line could get underway by the spring of 2022.

On Thursday, March 21, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation held a public hearing on the preliminary design plans for the roadway reconstruction. Although the state officials and engineers outnumbered the residents in attendance for the meeting, there was a good amount of information provided on the shape, scope, and timeline of the road reconstruction project.

“We are finishing the 25 percent design stage,” said Larry Cash, the MassDOT project manager. “After this hearing, we will be advancing to the final design stage.”

The purpose of the project is to increase safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, and vehicles along the Broadway corridor and intersecting streets in the city, according to Weston and Sampson engineer Larry Keegan. He said there will be new turn lanes, additional vehicle stacking room, and traffic signals at the project intersections allowing for the safer turning of vehicles and improved safety for pedestrians and bicyclists. The plans also include dedicated bicycle lanes through the one-mile stretch.

“There have been 97 collisions over a three-year period” along that portion of Broadway,” said Keegan. “That is above the state average.”

Keegan pointed to poor intersection layout, outdated traffic signals, and deficient pedestrian, bicycle, and public transit accommodations as being among the chief culprits for the high number of accidents. All of those issues will be addressed during the roadway reconstruction, he said.

In addition to the repaving of the road itself, a major component of the work includes new sidewalks and improved drainage.

Sidewalk improvements will mean the removal of some trees.

“The existing trees are old and unhealthy, lifting up the sidewalks themselves so that they are not ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliant,” said Keegan.

Other areas that will get major upgrades are the MBTA bus stops along the route. Keegan noted that there is deterioration of pavement and pavement markings from years of use along the mile of Broadway, and that the deterioration is especially pronounced at the bus stops.

The proposed project will require permanent and temporary easements from adjacent property owners, but Cash said those easements are either temporary to allow for construction work along the road, or are for the installation or minor regrading of sidewalks.

As with any project that involves ripping up pavement and sidewalks to make way for improvements, there will be traffic and construction impacts once work gets underway.

But Keegan said the plan is to keep disruptions to a minimum and traffic flowing as easily as possible.

“No detours are anticipated at this time,” he said.

During the day, the plan is to have a single lane of traffic closed and have the traffic managed by police. At night, there will be two-way traffic, according to Keegan. Access to schools, businesses, and residences will be kept open as much as possible, he added.

Chelsea resident John Gunning asked if the bus stops would remain in the current locations and if there would be improvements to the bus shelters.

Keegan said engineers will be working with the MBTA during the next phase of design to address some of those issues.

“The T wants certain things and the city wants certain things (for the bus stops),” he said. “We are looking at different options at this point.”

Dunning said he would like to see fresh, new bus shelters and stops that will complement the surrounding area and completed improvements.

Cash said design, permitting, and right of way acquisition for the project will continue through 2019 and 2020 with construction anticipated to start in the spring of 2022.

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Top 100

Top 100

The City released the 2018 payroll figures for the City of Chelsea this week. The top earner was once again Chief Brian Kyes at $230,344, as per his recent contract. For the police earners, much of the gross salary listed also include detail pay, the vast majority of which does not come from City funds. Of the Top 10 highest paid, eight were from the Police or Fire Departments. City Manager Tom Ambrosino checked in at number 10, making $180,441.

NAME TITLE EARNINGS

Brian Kyes Chief of Police $230,344.33

Joseph Fern Sergeant $211,872.46

Thomas Dunn Captain Police Dept. $205,872.85

Waynen Ulwick Deputy Chief $203,288.67

Keith Houghton Captain Police Dept. $197,453.50

David Batchelor Captain Police Dept. $194678.46

John Quatieri Deputy Chief $183,497.21

Mary Bourque Superintendent 225 $182,148.98

Robert Houghton Deputy Chief $182,019.22

Thomas Ambrosino City Mgr. $180,441.72

Hector Gonzalez Sergeant $176,440.18

Michael Thompson Captain Fire Dept. $166,379.54

Michael Masucci Deputy Chief $166,189.31

Paul Giancola Deputy Chief $166,978.20

Edwin Nelson Lt. Police Dept. $164,488.50

Michael Addonizio Sergeant $162.911.18

Edward McGarry Deputy Chief $161,706.80

David Flibotte Sergeant $160,531.80

Rony Gobin Capt. Fire Dept. $158,983.82

John Noftle Sergeant $156,654.04

Robert Denning Capt. Fire Dept. $156,582.07

Leonard Albanese Fire Chief $156,436.80

Paul Doherty Capt. Fire Dept. $156,210.97

William Dana Capt. Police Dept. $155,886.74

Daniel Delaney Lt. Police Dept. $153,015.37

William Briquela Sergeant $151,980.26

Stephen Purcell Capt. Fire Dept. $151,220.30

Michael Gurska Capt. Fire Dept. $150,926.52

David Betz Lt. Police Dept. $149,452.67

Scott Conley Patrolman $148,971.14

William Krasco Patrolman $148,129.25

Thomas McLain Patrolman $147,994.81

Brian Dunn Lt. Police Dept. $146,432.04

Richard Wilcox Lt. Fire Dept. $146,159.30

Lyle Abell Patrolman $145,456.77

Robert Moschella Patrolman $144,743.05

Linda Breau Dep/Asst. Superintendent $144,048.58

Anthony D’Alba Sergeant $143,491.93

Richard Carroccino Capt. Fire Dept. $142,271.06

Robert Cameron Deputy Chief $141,745.95

Priti Johari Asst. Super 225 $141,549.97

Philip Rogers Capt. Fire Dept. $141,486.55

Nicole McLaughlin Patrolman $138,758.46

Gerald McCue Director Exempt $138,498.37

Jacqueline Maloney Principal 220 $138,370.05

Michael Lee Capt. Fire Dept. $137,816.45

David Rizzuto Lt. Police Dept. $135,789.24

Edward Keefe Deputy City Mgr. $134,355.42

Richard Perisie Deputy Chief $133,742.54

Jon Maldonado Patrolman $133,573.84

Angelica Guerra Patrolman $133,489.66

Adele Lubarsky Principal 220 $133,299.92

Philip Merritt Capt. Fire Dept. $133,167.89

Sarah Kent Asst. Super 220 $132,598.96

Randy Grajal Teacher $132,365.77

Anthony Tiro Lt. Fire Dept. $129,619.11

Cindy Rosenberg Director/SPED $129,238.46

John Bower Lt. Police Dept. $129,087.69

Michael Villanueva Patrolman $128,705.88

Michael Nee Sergeant $128,519.44

Ronald Schmidt Principal 220 $128,419.34

Stephen Garcia Patrolman $128,106.06

Joseph Capistran Patrolman $128,032.49

Garrison Daniel Patrolman $127,915.71

Linda Barber Asst. Principal $127,803.92

Gary Poulin Firefighter $127,245.49

Sylvia Vazquez Teacher $126,762.71

Joseph Stutto Patrolman $126,042.52

Mark Martineau Asst. Principal $125,942.86

David Bishop Lt. Fire Dept. $125,542.09

Michelle Martinello Principal 220 $125,500.04

Christian Lehmann Lt. Fire Dept. $125,163.61

Jose Torres Firefighter $124,622.98

Joanne O’Brien Patrolman $124,618.74

Michael Noone Patrolman $124,616.70

Richard Bellomo Patrolman $124,592.28

Michael Talbot Principal 200 $123,749.98

Mark Aliberti Lt. Fire Dept. $123,739.98

Augustus Casucci Patrolman $123,288.79

Cheryl Fisher City Solicitor $122,859.54

Adam Deleidi Principal 220 $122,500.04

Paul McCarthy Patrolman $121,779.06

Paul Marchese Patrolman $121,317.29

Star Chung Patrolman $121,169.07

Joseph Cooney Dir. Of Blgds/Grounds $121,153.88

Julie Shea Principal 220 $120,750.11

Nathaniel Meyers Principal 220 $120,500.05

Christopher Troisi Patrolman $120,363.74

Daniel Dejordy Lt. Fire Dept. $120,334.37

Long Lam Patrolman $118,106.45

Carlos Vega Patrolman $117,787.32

Joan Sullivan Director Exempt $117,584.55

Bertram Taverna Dir. Of Public Works $117,344.83

Juan Sanchez Patrolman $117,235.48

Alan Beausoleil Coordinator $116,774.31

John Coen Sergeant $116,114.05

David Batchelor Patrolman $116,023.49

Robert Brown Capt. Fire Dept. $115,978.37 Damon Peykar Coordinator $115,667.73

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Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

A Lynn teen, who was originally from Chelsea, pleaded guilty March 7 as his trial was set to begin on charges that he opened fire during a party three years ago, killing 19-year-old Pablo Villeda and injuring six others.

Emanuel Marrero, 19, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in connection with Pablo Villeda’s March 6, 2016, shooting death, as well as six counts of armed assault with intent to murder and related charges for injuries suffered by six other young people.

Pablo Villeda was killed in an early morning teen party on March 6, 2016 held at a vacant apartment on Washington Avenue. On Thursday, March 7, Emanuel Marrero pleaded guilty in court to his murder.

Judge Linda Giles imposed the mandatory sentence of life in prison, ordering that he be eligible for parole after 15 years and that his sentences on the non-fatal shootings be served concurrently. Had he chosen to go to trial, the defendant – who was 16 at the time of the homicide – would have faced a first-degree murder charge.

“We accepted this plea because it delivers a significant measure of accountability for the defendant’s actions, which took Pablo’s life just as it was ready to begin,” District Attorney Rachael Rollins said. “It also considers all the potential outcomes at trial and on appeal, as well as the defendant’s age at the time of the homicide. Nothing we do can bring Pablo Villeda back to his loving family, but I hope this final result can at least provide them with closure to this tragic event.”

Chief Brian Kyes said he hopes the prison sentence will bring closure to the family on what was a tragic night in Chelsea three years ago.

“This was certainly a tragic night for everyone involved and one that none of us will soon forget,” said Kyes. “We truly hope that the imposition of this prison sentence by the Suffolk County Superior Court will bring some sense of solace to the family of Pablo Villeda that they absolutely deserve. Senseless acts of violence like this have no place in our neighborhoods and we will continue to work with our community partners to prevent tragedies like this from ever occurring again.”

Chelsea Police responded to 120 Washington Ave. in the early morning hours of March 6, 2016, for multiple calls reporting a disturbance at a party held inside a vacant apartment. They arrived to find seven people, ranging in age from 15 to 22, suffering gunshot wounds. Pablo was rushed to the hospital but succumbed to his injuries; the surviving victims were treated at Whidden Memorial Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Assistant District Attorney Julie Higgins of the DA’s Homicide Unit was prepared to introduce evidence and testimony showing that the defendant brought a .40 caliber handgun to the party, flaunting it to several other attendees. At some point, the evidence would have shown, the defendant confronted the victim and opened fire. Pablo was mortally wounded and six other people were struck, and fortunately survived their injuries. The defendant fled the scene but was identified in the course of an exhaustive investigation by Chelsea Police detectives and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit. The defendant was represented by attorney Richard Chambers

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Clark Avenue Middle to be Named After Legendary Morrie Siegel

Clark Avenue Middle to be Named After Legendary Morrie Siegel

By Seth Daniel and Laura Plummer

The City Council and the School Committee have voted to name the new Clark Avenue Middle School after long-time School Committeeman and former Williams School Principal Morris ‘Morrie’ Seigel.

At Monday night’s City Council meeting, the matter was brought up for a vote on a request forwarded from the School Committee – who had voted to approve the move.

The late Morrie Seigel pictured here in May 2013 when he served as the Chief Marshal of the Memorial Day Girl Scout Parade. The new Clark Avenue Middle School has been named after him.

The Council voted unanimously on the proposal by City Manager Thomas Ambrosino to dedicate the Clark Avenue Middle School to the late educator and community member. It will now be known as the Morris H. Seigel Clark Avenue Middle School.

City Council members spoke fondly about Seigal.

“Mr. Seigal was not only a wonderful person for the city of Chelsea, he was a great gentleman,” said Councilman Calvin Brown. “When he wasn’t in his professional attire, he had his Chelsea jacket on, his Chelsea hat on, displaying his pride.”

Said Councillor Giovanni Recupero, “There’s only one [way] to describe Mr. Seigal–great person. If anyone deserves this, it’s Mr. Seigal. He was the teacher of my kids for many years. For 40 years, I knew the gentleman and he was a very nice person.”

Seigel was an educator in the City and served as the principal of the Williams School. He was a School Committeeman for 29 years, and a youth leader at the Chelsea YMHA.

In 2013, as a noted veteran, he was the Chief Marshal of the Memorial Day Girl Scout Parade.

He passed away in October 2013.

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