St Stan’s Church Stands Against Street Change On Chestnut

St Stan’s Church Stands Against Street Change On Chestnut

St. Stanislaus Church has submitted a petition with dozens of signatures requesting that the City not leave the temporary direction change on Chestnut Street intact.

“This change has been detrimental to the day-to-day business operations of the Parish rectory, prohibits our elderly parishioners from entering and exiting their vehicles in a safe manner, prevents the safe loading and unloading of supplies to both the rectory and the church, disrupts the motor vehicle processional for funerals, impedes workers coming make repairs and service calls to the Church and rectory and causes an increase of noise during our solemn services due to the excessive congestion of traffic,” read the letter accompanying the petition, which was presented to the City Council and Traffic Commission.

Chestnut Street has long had an odd configuration at Fourth Street, with no one able to turn in either direction coming off the Mystic/Tobin Bridge exit. Both sides empty onto Fourth Street. However, during construction on the Beacon Street off-ramp, Chestnut was made one way all the way from City Hall to Everett Avenue – one long stretch.

It became popular with many drivers, but especially the Police and Fire Departments. Fire officials said they felt it helped response times from Central Fire in getting to Everett Avenue.

A petition to make the temporary change into a permanent change is now before the Traffic Commission and City Council.

Count St. Stan’s against it.

“It is jeopardizing the existence of our self-supporting Parish, which has been in existence for the past 110 years,” read the letter. “Chestnut Street is a narrow, one lane road, in a heavily populated residential neighborhood. It is unable to maintain the increased flow of traffic caused by vehicles coming from the Fourth Street off-ramp to the Bridge.”

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Police Briefs 12-06-2018

Police Briefs 12-06-2018

Tuesday, 11/20

Ana Gonzalez, 59, 90 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

David Henao-Jimenez, 19, 121 Union St., Everett, was arrested for speeding, unlicensed operation of motor vehicle and possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle.

Wednesday, 11/21                                                                                                                

Maria Ortiz, 49, 172 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Saturday, 11/24

Faisal Yerow, 23, 180 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a probation warrant.

Christina Belcher, 412, 550 Ferry St., Everett, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Edwin Ibanez, 30, 589 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for ordinance violation, alcoholic beverage/marijuana/THC, disorderly conduct, assault, disturbing the peace and threat to commit a crime.

Sunday, 11/25

Gabriel Castillo, 25, 9 Southend, Lynn, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle, speeding and warrants.


THREATENED WOMAN

On Nov. 24, at 7:32 p.m., officers were dispatched to 1 Marlborough St. for a report of a male party following and threatening a female party. The female victim stated that the male followed her from the area of 400 Broadway. During this time she told officers he was making inappropriate comments to her. At one point he walked in front of her and blocked her path while escalating the comments to threats to cause her harm. Witnesses interceded, and the male fled the area.

A short time later he was positively identified and placed into custody.

Edwin Ibanez, 30, of 589 Broadway, was charged with marijuana violation, disorderly conduct (subsequent offense), assault, disturbing the peace, and threatening to commit a crime.

MAN PULLS KNIFE AT DAY CENTER

On Nov. 14, at approximately 9 a.m., CPD officers were dispatched to 738 Broadway, the Pentecostal Church resource center for a report of a male with a knife. Upon arrival, the victim stated that the man at the scene pulled a knife on him. A knife was found on the subject, and he was placed under arrest.

Michael Catino, 34, of Malden, was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

DANCIN’ IN THE STREETS

On Nov. 24, at 11 a.m., officers observed an intoxicated female causing a disturbance on Broadway. The officers tried to ascertain the woman’s identity but were answered with threats and derogatory comments. The woman continued to disregard the officer’s commands while impeding pedestrian and motor vehicle traffic. She was placed under arrest.

Christina Belcher, 41, of Everett, was charged with disorderly conduct.

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Obituaries 10-18-2018

Obituaries 10-18-2018

Elisa Cortes-DeJesus

Hispanic Community Advocate

Elisa Cortes-DeJesus of Saugus died on Oct.1 3.

Born on May 10, 1949 in Arroyo, Puerto Rico, she spent her early years on the island and met her husband, Jose Otero Valentin in the city of Santurce, Puerto Rico.  They had two children, Jose Otero Jr. and Elsa Otero.  She moved off the island after her divorce and settled in Chelsea in the early 70’s. She worked and put herself through school to earn a Masters Degree in education from Antioch University. She became a social worker and an advocate for the Hispanic community. She was also employed by the city of Chelsea and then by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the Department of Transitional Assistance for many years. She was also involved with the Puerto Rican festival committee for several years.

She lived in Chelsea most of her life and eventually moved to Saugus in 2009 with her husband of 19 years, Jose Ocasio. She was the devoted mother of Jose Otero and his companion, Colleen Lewis and Elsa Otero and her companion, Esteban Caraballo; beloved sister of Maggie Paris and Eduardo Paris, both of Puerto Rico and the late Enrique Paris and Victor DeJesus; cherished grandmother of Angel Andrades, Alexandria Andrades, Cristian Alas, Rosario Alas and Dante Otero. She is also lovingly survived by her great grandson, Xavier Ferreira as well as many nieces and nephews.

Family and friends are kindly invited to attend her Funeral from the Smith Funeral Home, 125 Washington Avenue, Chelsea today, Thursday, Oct. 18 at 9 a.m. followed by a Funeral Mass to be celebrated in St. Rose Church, 600 Broadway, Chelsea at 10 o’clock. Services will conclude with interment at Riverside Cemetery, Saugus. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that memorial contributions in her name be made to the Kaplan Family Hospice House, 78 Liberty Street, Danvers, MA 01923.

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Irene Tkaczuk

Former Clerk Supervisor at the Chelsea Memorial Hospital (now MGH), long active in the Chelsea Polish Community

Irene F. (Flower) Tkaczuk passed away Monday morning, Oct. 15 at the Rosewood Nursing Center in Peabody after a long, chronic illness. She was 89 years old.

The daughter of the late Louis and Frances (Weslowski) Flower, Irene was born and raised in Chelsea. She attended local schools and graduated from Chelsea High School, Class of 1947.

She was the beloved wife of John A. Tkaczuk of Peabody, with whom she shared 71 years of marriage. Together they raised their family in Chelsea until moving to Peabody, which is where they have resided for the last 17 years.

Irene dedicated 23 years as a clerk supervisor at the former Chelsea Memorial Hospital which later became the MGH. Overseeing the billing and accounts receivable, she retired in 1986. Irene was the President, Past President, State Officer, and Sgt. at Arms of the P.A.V. Post 13 of Chelsea. As a 70-year member, she earned her gold star membership of the Polish Falcons. Irene is a late member of the St. Stanislaus Church in Chelsea. She and her husband were involved in many of the Church’s organizations over the years. During her retirement, Irene enjoyed polka dancing with her husband and spending time at their winter residence in Port St. Lucie, Florida. She will be greatly missed by all of her family.

The devoted mother of Frances Tkaczuk of Mashpee, Paula Kordis and her husband Ted of Peabody and the late Frederick “Fred” Tkaczuk, she was the dear sister of Wanda Carroccino of Lynn, sister-in-law of the late Joseph Carroccino and is also survived by three grandchildren: Matthew, John Andrew, and Christopher Kordis, all of Swampscott.

Relatives and friends are most kindly invited to attend her funeral and family visitation at the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, 718 Broadway, Chelsea on Friday, Oct. 19 from 8 to 9:30 a.m. immediately followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Stanislaus Church, 163 Chestnut St., Chelsea at 10 a.m. Services will conclude with Interment at Woodlawn Cemetery, Everett. The Funeral Home is fully handicap accessible, ample parking opposite Funeral Home.

Should friends desire, contributions in Irene’s memory may be made to Care Dimensions 75 Sylvan St., B-102 Danvers, MA 01923 and/or Catholic TV P.O. Box 9196 Watertown, MA 02471.  For directions or to send expressions of sympathy, please visit www.WelshFuneralHome.com

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Hundreds Join Roca for Its 30th Anniversary Celebration Party

An outpouring of community love, relentlessness and transformation echoed around Park Street Wednesday as the region’s leaders joined hundreds of young people, the adults that love them and community partners in celebrating Roca’s deep impact the last three decades.

Roca’s participants, staff, alumni and partners came together for a night of live music and food to celebrate Roca’s 30th anniversary. Roca leaders thanked the community, its partners and allies in making such a difference in young people’s lives.

“I am in awe of all of you and all the young people we have met, had the honor of working with the last 30 years and all of the Roca team, our partners and this community who made all this relentlessness possible,” said Roca Founder and CEO Molly Baldwin.

At the event, Roca honored its Roca30 Unsung Hero Awardees, including state Sen. Sal DiDomenico, Probation Commissioner Edward Dolan, Youth Services Commissioner Peter Forbes, Boston Police Captain Haseeb Hosein, Chelsea Police Captain David Batchelor, Hampden County First Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Fitzgerald and Kim Hanton, director of diversionary addiction services at North Suffolk Mental Health Association.

“These seven individuals work on issues and for people who are well out of the headlines and far from the limelight because it’s the right thing and because it makes a difference,” said Baldwin. “They are truly unsung heroes.”

Featured speakers at the event were Jay Ash, secretary of housing and economic development under Gov. Charlie Baker, Harry Spence, the former Receiver of Chelsea and Massachusetts Court Administration and Eric Rodriguez, a founding Roca youth member and lead pastor of The Way Church.

The most special part of the evening came when Roca also honored seven youth participants as unsung heroes as well – seven young people whose lives have been upended by Roca’s relentless outreach, its transformative programs and its many partnerships.

Those young people are:

  • Joseph Acosta
  • Caralis Rosario Hernandez
  • Dakwam Johnson
  • Ana Mejia
  • Amauris Melendez
  • Gage Morrow
  • Dennis Rodriguez

Each of the speakers paused to honor Roca and its team, in particular the driving force of the last 30 years – Molly Baldwin. Ash, the former Chelsea City Manager, presented Baldwin with a award honoring her service and summed up the accollades of many by noting her personal relentlessness as an indisputable driver of Roca’s success.

“If not for Molly Baldwin, there are so many people who wouldn’t be where they are or even alive today,” said Ash. “Molly’s life of service and her relentlessness is an inspiration to us all.”

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Obituaries 10-11-2018

Faublas Etienne

Chef in USA and former Judge in Haiti

Faublas Etienne passed away at his Revere home on Saturday morning, Oct. 6 surrounded by his loving family.  He was 86 years old.

Born in Saint-Michel-de-l’ Attalaye Gonaives, Haiti, the beloved son of the late Gabelius Etienne and Elvira Pierre, Faublas was a former judge in Haiti but when he came to the United States he made his living as a chef.  He worked as a chef in New York for several years before moving to Massachusetts.  Faublas dedicated 28 years of service as a chef at the Sheraton Newton Hotel, retiring in 2013.

A Revere resident for the last 16 years, Faublas was a member of the Haitian Missionary Church in Somerville.  As a member of the men’s group, he participated in many church activities over the years.  He will be greatly missed by his large family and friends in the community.

The beloved husband of Marie J. (Norvil) Etienne, he was the devoted father of Virginie Etienne Bois, Fournel Etienne, Faubert Etienne, Yola Etienne, Jeff Etienne, Kennel Etienne, Kenny Etienne, Mirlande Cenat and the late Josette Etienne and Wesner Etienne, dear brother of Yolande Etienne of Florida and Marie Ange Etienne of Port au Prince, Haiti.  Faublas is also lovingly survived by 27 grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren.

Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to attend Faublas’ visiting hours at the Haitian Missionary Church of Somerville, 100 Temple St., Somerville on Friday, Oct. 12 from 6 to 8 p.m.  His funeral will be from the above named Church on Saturday at 10 a.m.  An hour of visitation will be held prior to the service, from 9 to 10 a.m. Interment will conclude the service at the Woodlawn Cemetery in Everett.  Funeral arrangements are entrusted to the Carafa Family Funeral Home in Chelsea.

Susan Jean Pizzano

March 28, 1953 – September 24, 2018

Susan Jean (Perry)_Pizzano of East Boston passed away unexpectedly on Sept. 24. She was 65 years old.

The wife of 39 years to Henry Pizzano III of East Boston and formerly of Chelsea. Susan was born in Lynn and grew up in Saugus. She was a graduate of Saugus High School, Class of 1971. Susan worked in all aspects of the department store industry. Later in life, she was a school bus driver as well as a taxi driver and dispatcher with No. Shore Taxi Co. She retired in 2000. She was an animal lover at heart.

Susan was the daughter of the late Paul L. and Inez (Puffer) Perry and sister of the late Christine Collins. She is survived by her husband, Henry; sister, Barbara Maw of Nashua, NH, brothers, Paul Perry of Loudon, NH and Robert Perry of Pennsylvia and her brother in law, Cliff Collins of Hinesburg, Vt. She is also survived by several nieces and nephews as well as her beloved cat Lucy “Lulu.” Funeral services were private with arrangements by Anthony Memorial-Frank A. Welsh and Sons Funeral Home, Chelsea.
Should friends desire, contributions in her memory may be made to Northeast Animal Shelter, 347 Highland Ave, Salem, MA 01970

Kathy Ann Dwyer

Of Chelsea

Kathy Ann Dwyer 68 of Chelsea passed away peacefully at the Everett Nursing Rehab and Nursing Center in Everett on September 27, 2018.  She was preceded in death by her parents, David L. Dwyer and Hazel G. Dwyer, and a brother David L. Dwyer, Jr.  She is survived by 7 brothers and sisters:  William and J. Barry, both of Chelsea, Robert of Pennysylvania, Richard of Boston, a sister Linda of Georgetown, Ma., a twin brother Michael of Penna., and her sister Jacqueline of Saugus, Ma. as well as many nieces and nephews.

Kathy worked for many years as a bookkeeper and for awhile owned and operated her own dance studio in Chelsea.  As a  lifelong resident of Chelsea, Kathy had many dear friends and acquaintances.  She had a very endearing personality and a big heart.  To know her was to love her.  She will be sadly missed.

In addition to the wonderful care that Kathy received at the Everett Nursing Facility for the past several years, she was also given tremendous love and affection from the Compassionate Care Hospice in her time of need.  The family is forever indebted to both outstanding agencies.  Through the benevolence of the Casper Funeral Home of Boston, arrangements were made.  Burial services will be private.

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Day Center on Broadway Making Strides, Ready for Next Step

Day Center on Broadway Making Strides, Ready for Next Step

The Chelsea Day Center in the Light of Christ Church on Broadway has been a haven for those who had nowhere to go during the day, the folks that formerly hung out all day in Bellingham Square, and though it hasn’t been perfect City officials believe there is still a great need for the Center.

One wouldn’t get an argument from those who attend the Center.

“I came here to get away from the stress outside, and I have no stress here,” said Ovidio Ortiz, who has been coming for one year since the Day Center opened. “Shelters in Boston are very far and they have too much violence and drugs. Here, they don’t have that. This beats a shelter. There aren’t any problems inside and I wish they had it Saturday and Sunday too. Outside on the street people are fighting and drinking and doing drugs. Not here. I’m safe here and I can rest. We need this here.”

He was but one of about 20 people who were at the Day Center last Friday, Aug. 10. The Center is open Monday through Friday from the morning until 1 p.m. Those who attend can get food, three times a week they can take a shower, and they have access to medical care and a host of recovery services.

At the heart of it all has been Pastor Ruben Rodriguez and Pastor Ricardo Valle – who shepherds the Light of Christ Church.

Rodriguez has worked with the street population in Chelsea for years, and made a commitment to shepherd the Day Center for a year until it was up and running. On Aug. 20, he will move on to new things, and CAPIC will begin managing the Center with Valle and his volunteers.

“It’s been a great run, but it’s also been humbling,” he said. “There are pros and cons to it. We have had problems outside, and we’re working on that. What’s going on inside, people have gotten a lot from it. There’s been 6,000 meals served, hundreds of showers and hours and hours of rest for people who had nowhere to rest that was safe. We’ve had hundreds resourced to programs.

“The best part about this place though is a lot of the people doing the work are the people who come here,” he continued. “They have taken ownership of this place. That’s very good for them. They respect it. I hope they continue to respect it and build this community when I leave and CAPIC takes over.”

Pastor Valle said little by little they are making progress.

“When they come the first time, it’s really new to them and they aren’t sure about it,” he said. “But soon they come and it’s a home to them. The people who do really good, we give them work to do. When you start something like this, people will be against it and people will be for it. You do what you can to help. We pray about it, but the City agrees we need this place.”

And that is the case.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said there is still good work going on at the Day Center. While the functions inside have been exemplary in helping people have a safe place and access to resources, there have been some problems outside after the Center closes. It has been a sore spot with neighbors, but Ambrosino said he believes they can solve that issue with CAPIC.

“The City still feels it is of very great need to have and overall we think it has been helpful, providing food and shelter and resources for a population we’re really trying to reach and engage,” he said. “There’s been some hiccups there with people loitering outside. We think based on our discussions, some actions we’re taking with the pastor and CAPIC will address these things. CAPIC will begin to be more engaged in the operation Aug. 20.”

Rodriguez said he is very proud of the work they have done, and is excited to get back to working directly with those on the streets – a calling he is very passionate about.

“You always are surprised who shows up here,” he said. “Sometimes it’s good, sometimes it’s bad. I want people to know we tried to know we tried to make it the best way we could. I think it was a success. I hope as it goes on these people in the community that need this help are blessed.”

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Temple Emmanuel, a Renaissance in Chelsea

Temple Emmanuel, a Renaissance in Chelsea

Chelsea was a thriving center of Jewish life during the last century.  Located just four miles northeast of downtown Boston, Chelsea had the densest concentration of Jews outside of New York City.  The Jewish immigrants to Chelsea established about two dozen orthodox synagogues and one conservative temple.  Temple Emmanuel was formed in the 1930s and continues with a dedicated congregation from the local area and across the US.

As a commitment to Temple Emmanuel and Chelsea, the members raised almost $100,000 and just completed an extensive renovation.  The sanctuary was built in the 1840s as a Methodist-Episcopal church with high ceilings and excellent sight lines to the ark.  In the 1950s the sanctuary, which seated almost 500, was often full for the high holidays.  We still attract crowds to our major functions.  A few years ago we mounted a Jews of Chelsea Exhibition that attracted more than 500 visitors.

The re-invigoration of Temple Emmanuel reflects a loyal membership and a dynamic tireless president, Sara Lee Saievetz Callahan.  Sara Lee learned effective leadership from her mother and grandmother, who were very active in the community including the Chelsea Soldiers Home and the Assumption Church.  Rabbi Oksana Chapman has been very creative in preserving some religious aspects of conservative traditions while adapting to embrace a diverse community.  For example, services now include a chorus and musicians; interfaith and same-sex weddings and congregants are celebrated.  The temple renovations include a large social hall and an updated kitchen, which can accommodate up to 135 for both religious and secular functions.

Chelsea is in the midst of a renaissance and is growing with the construction of government, commercial, and residential buildings plus a new transportation hub.  Temple Emmanuel welcomes new residents, those with roots in Chelsea, and anyone seeking a welcoming and warm environment (haimish in Yiddish).  We invite visitors and prospective members at any service or function.

Temple Emmanuel is throwing a party and invites you to celebrate our recent renovations and continued commitment to the renaissance of Chelsea.

Saturday evening

June 16, 2018

7-11 PM

Temple Emanuel

60 Tudor Street in Chelsea

Enjoy our food stations!

Dance and enjoy our entertainment!

View our exhibit: a century of Chelsea cultural life!

Just $100 per person, which includes two tickets for beer and wine. Call 617-889-1736 for more information.

Come see the preservation of Chelsea history.  The Temple Emmanuel building dates from the 1840s as a Methodist-Episcopal church with high ceilings, excellent sight lines, and solid elegant woodwork.

As a commitment to Temple Emmanuel and Chelsea, we raised almost $100,000 and are completing an extensive renovation.  We continue as enthusiastic supporters of our community by investing in the renewal of Chelsea.  Come see our progress and celebrate with us!

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Remembering Kathy Finklestein

Remembering Kathy Finklestein

They came from all walks of life, bowlers and business people, friends and family, people of all faiths and backgrounds – and what they all had in common was this: to have known Kathleen “Kathy” (Pawlak) Finklestein was to have known an extraordinary human being.

Kathleen “Kathy” Finklestein

Kathleen “Kathy” Finklestein

Many, like Joe Surette, who came with his wife, Cathy Walata, to the Welsh Funeral Home to say good-bye, said just so with their words and actions.

“She was truly one of the nicest people I ever met in my life,” said Surette. “We are all so saddened by her passing.”

Kathleen “Kathy” Finklestein died on April 10 after experiencing a sudden and overwhelming advance of cancer that had struck this brave and seemingly indestructible woman four years ago. She was 62 years old.

The daughter of the late Chester P. and Carole M. (Lombardozzi) Pawlak, Kathy grew up in the family home on Broadway. She was an excellent student who attended St. Stanislaus Parochial School on Chestnut Street, Shurtleff Junior High School, and Chelsea High School, Class of 1973.

During her high school years, she started dating another “All-A” student with a similarly warm personality and generousness, Neal Finklestein. They were married in 1979 and shared 39 years of happiness together. As Kathy’s sister, Chrissy Pawlak, told the large assemblage at the Mass at St. Mary of the Assumption Church in Revere, “It was at Chelsea High School where she hit the jackpot of all jackpots, she started dating Neal. Everyone should have a Neal in their lives.”

Many knew Kathy from the candlepin bowling scene. She helped her wonderful father, “Chet,” run Chelsea Square Alleys, a place where the Pawlak family made everyone feel welcomed and safe.

Kathy became an outstanding bowler and she and her sister, Chrissy, reached the top tier of the sport when they appeared on the Channel 5 “Candlepin Doubles” professional bowling show. She also won a mixed doubles championship in the old Chelsea Record Bowling Tournament, leading the way with a record-setting, five-string score of 610.

Hall of Famer Richie “Hawk” Halas, one of so many bowlers who paid their respects to Kathy, said of his fellow professional, “As great a bowler as she was, she was an even better person.”

Known for her keen organizational skills, Kathy directed candlepin bowling leagues in Chelsea and Malden, providing bowlers with a fun night of competition and camaraderie each week.

Chelsea business owners became admirers of Kathy Finklestein and her incredible work ethic through her efforts at the Chelsea Chamber of Commerce. Programs such as the Pot-O-Gold Dinner and the Brighter Holidays Committee Awards presentations brought so much enjoyment to Chamber members because Kathy put her maximum effort in to every endeavor she undertook.

Allan I. Alpert, past president of the Chelsea Chamber of Commerce, said Kathy, who owned Chelsea Secretarial Services, was a tremendous asset to the organization.

 “Kathy was very active as an outstanding member of the Chamber of Commerce as our secretary, and when we didn’t have an executive director, she pretty much filled the role on a voluntary basis, and would not take any compensation from the Chamber that she loved so dearly,” said Alpert. “She is really going to be missed.”

Peter Zaksheski, also a past president of the Chamber, said of Kathy, “You could not have a truer friend and confidante than Kathy. When I was Chamber president, if I were good, Kathy was the reason. She was the backbone. She was such a great person.”

The Rev. Richard A. Uftring presided over the funeral Mass at the church. He knew Kathy personally through her being a faithful parishioner and a Eucharistic Minister and her membership in the Church Crochet Club.

“Kathy lived her faith, she loved her family – this is her family of friends,” said the Rev. Uftring.

 Kathy’s cousin, Judy Covino, and sister, Chrissy Pawlak, each delivered beautiful words of remembrance.

“Kathy was all about giving and she gave it all to her involvement in the Chelsea Chamber of Commerce where you would find her on the planning committees for the Pot-O-Gold, the Christmas Holiday Children’s Holiday Party, and of course my favorite, the annual trip to Foxwoods or Mohegan,” said Covino.

“She was a great behind-the-scenes person who never took the credit. The success of so many fundraisers were the results of her tireless efforts.”

Covino noted how Kathy and Neal loved going to the Boston Garden to cheer on the Boston Celtics and Boston Bruins. “She also attended many Red Sox games, including Big Papi’s last game.”

Covino told how Kathy would assist others as the family caregiver.

“If you look up caregiver in the dictionary, Kathy’s picture would be right beside it. She was always there for everybody.”

Chrissy Pawlak said as time went on, “Kathy became my first and forever best friend. Following her through life was easy, even though those were really big shoes to follow. My sister was the smartest person I will ever know academically and in life.”

Chrissy recalled how much Kathy and Neal enjoyed being with their family and friends at gatherings and on trips. “I know Kathy loved every minute of it. She took over the holiday traditions, keeping everybody together at her house. The summertime was her favorite where the backyard and the pool were open and the barbecue was going.”

Chrissy perfectly articulated what everyone, including their good friend, Jimmy Manzo, will know forever, “Kathy really was a beautiful person and a blessing to the world. She was the first one to step up to help anyone. She loved doing a lot of things for a lot of people. She will always be my hero. Give mom and dad hugs and kisses. I will forever be proud to be Kathy’s sister and you, Kathy, truly were the wind beneath our wings.”

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Station of the Cross

Station of the Cross

ChelseaRecord

Julio Figueroa as John The Apostle, Ramona Rodriguez as Mary Mother Of Jesus, and Kinian Lobo as Mary Madeline march in grief at Jesus’s suffering during the annual St. Rose of Lima Church’s Stations of the Cross throughout the streets of Chelsea on Good Friday, March 30. Hundreds of parishioners came out to participate in the march.

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2018 Black History Month

2018 Black History Month

CHEL_20180215_A1

The Chelsea Black Community’s 2018 Black History Month Celebration continued Tuesday with an art exhibit opening at the City Hall Gallery. Pictured are some of the guests at the event, from left, Councillor-at-Large Calvin Brown, Beverly Martin-Ross, Sharon Caulfield, Councillor Luis Tejada, Yahiya Noor and son, Khasim Noor, Henry Wilson, Lisa Santagate, Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson, CBC President Joan Cromwell, and Ronald Robinson. The next Black History Month event is a Taste of Culture Cook-Off Monday at 5 p.m. at La Luz de Cristo Church, 738 Broadway.

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