Chelsea School Official Gerry McCue Honored at Retirement Celebration

Chelsea School Official Gerry McCue Honored at Retirement Celebration

The guests at the retirement celebration for popular Chelsea Public Schools official Gerry McCue gave him a

Assistant Supt. of Schools Sarah Kent, Human Resources Director Tina Sullivan, Deputy Supt. of Schools Linda Breau, and Supt. of Schools Dr. Mary Bourque make a special presentation to their retiring colleague, Gerry Mccue

prolonged standing ovation.

“I’m not done yet,” McCue politely told the crowd.

McCue continued his farewell speech, and when the guests knew he was done, they stood up again and showed their gratitude to a man who truly made a positive impact in Chelsea.

McCue, executive director for administration and finance for the Chelsea Public Schools, was honored at a retirement party June 14 at the Winthrop Yacht Club.

At the request of Supt. of Schools, Dr. Mary Bourque, McCue took a seat in a chair at the front of the hall as colleagues and associates took the podium to laud his 26 years of service in the Chelsea School Department.

Kelley and Lindsey McCue, his two daughters, spoke of how “our father has always led by example and he will be a tough act to follow.”

“Our dad has always been a role model, not only for his family, but for also for his extended family. He has a tremendous work ethic, he’s a compassionate leader, and a true advocate for the community he has worked in. Chelsea has been his home away from home for the past 26 years. Thank you for joining us tonight to celebrate Gerry’s next chapter in life which I’m sure will be filled with the same reward and fulfillment he’s had during his career here.”

Bourque said when she asked colleagues across the school district to describe Gerry McCue in one word, “we got, patient, listener, passionate, caring, dedicated, smart – but universally everyone one said, ‘calm.”

Bourque praised McCue’s wit and humor and his ability to remain calm no matter the chaos.

“Gerry, thank you for taking a risk on Chelsea public schools back in 1992 when the city was in receivership and the schools were not doing well,” said Bourque. “But we are a better school system because you have been here  and I am a better superintendent because I have had the honor of working with you as an assistant superintendent, deputy superintendent, and superintendent.”

In a warm and gracious speech, McCue said how much he enjoyed his work in Chelsea and being part of the Chelsea community at-large. He thanked his colleagues and his family for their support during his career and said the city will always have a special place in heart.

The two standing ovations said it all about the high esteem in which Gerry McCue was held and the valuable contribution he made to the Chelsea schools.

As Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson said afterwards, “This was a great tribute, a wonderful celebration for a true professional.”

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New School Finance Director Chosen from UMass’s Collins Center

New School Finance Director Chosen from UMass’s Collins Center

A senior associate from the Collins Center at UMass Boston has been chosen as the new School Department executive director of Administration and Finance, replacing long-time director Gerry McCue – who will retire this summer after 26 years at the post.

Monica Lamboy, a Charlestown resident, has accepted the position and will start on July 1 in the critical School Department position.

“In these changing times in our City and within our schools, Ms. Lamboy’s extensive background in financial and administrative management, organizational development, strategic and long range planning for both municipalities and for schools makes her uniquely qualified to step into the position of Executive Director of Administration and Finance,” wrote Supt. Mary Bourque.

Lamboy holds a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Princeton University and a Masters in City and Regional Planning from the University of California. For the last seven years, she has worked as a Senior Associate for the University of Massachusetts, Edward J. Collins Center for Public Management.

The Collins Center was the same organization used to conduct and choose the City Manager in Chelsea a few years ago.

As Senior Associate at the Collins Center, Lamboy has served as team leader working with municipal and school executives, and elected officials across the state on finance-related efforts including financial forecasts, financial policies, and capital improvement plans. Her organizational studies and strategic planning projects include economic development plans and trend reports which analyzed changes in population, business, housing, transportation, and infrastructure. She has led a team for the Brookline public schools that studied the district’s central administration, instructional and educational programs, special education, information technology functions, and salary structures all with recommended changes for efficiency and efficacy.

Prior to her work with the Collins Center she served the City of Somerville, District of Columbia (Washington, D.C.), and the City of Oakland in multiple departments and in various capacities. In the City of Oakland, she served as Special Assistant to the Superintendent for Business Services for the Oakland Unified School District.

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Massachusetts Falling Behind Rest of the Nation in Health Care Access, Efficiency

Massachusetts Falling Behind Rest of the Nation in Health Care Access, Efficiency

While Massachusetts has led the nation with health care reform, residents of the Commonwealth continue to lack basic access to primary and specialty care across the state. Poor patient access to care, an uncontrolled opioid epidemic and rising healthcare costs together present a perfect storm.  Many states however, have been proactive about removing practice barriers to increase access to NP driven care.

While other states have taken steps to position the NP workforce to meet rising needs, antiquated and unnecessarily restrictive laws and licensing requirements leave Massachusetts as one of only 13 states in the nation – and the only state in New England – that continues to maintain a such a restrictive nurse practice act. The unintended consequence of health reform is access to healthcare coverage without the same level of access to health care.  Without intervention for those patients seeking health care in Massachusetts, it is not likely to improve.

There are 9,500 qualified, educated Nurse Practitioners available to meet the healthcare challenges facing the Commonwealth. NPs are licensed, board certified and have achieved a master’s or doctoral degree.  With documented high quality outcomes, they are equipped to fill the gaps, enhance access to care, provide life-saving treatment for opioid use disorder and deliver a much-needed cost savings to the Commonwealth – and to patients. In failing to use NPs to the full extent of their education and training to optimize the state’s healthcare delivery system, Massachusetts is missing an opportunity to best serve patients.

For patients seeking access to basic healthcare services in Massachusetts, including both primary and specialty care, restricted NP practice contributes to longer wait times.  Research supports that for those patients seeking a new family medicine appointment, access delays in the Commonwealth are amongst the worst in the nation. Faced with longer wait times for appointments and contending with significant delays in care, patients may risk adverse health outcomes or rely on more costly care delivery settings, such as emergency rooms, for treatment.

Like the rest of the nation, the Commonwealth is experiencing an escalating number of opioid related deaths. According to the MA Department of Public Health, in 2016 there were 2,155 reported opioid related deaths in Massachusetts. Heartbreaking stories of neighbors, friends, coworkers, and family members dying from overdoses have become too familiar.  All available resources must be leveraged to combat this public health crisis, including access to Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), which has proven to be lifesaving. Nationally, NPs have contributed significantly to treating this disease. However, in Massachusetts, antiquated and unnecessarily restrictive laws and regulations mandating physician supervision for NP prescriptive practice are limiting the ability of NPs to respond to the epidemic. For those patients with opioid use disorder, such delays in receiving care can be life-threatening.

In 2009, a study by the Rand Corporation evaluating access and cost of care estimated Massachusetts could save millions of dollars through increased utilization of NPs.  Despite these recommendations, the state has still not acted. Office visits with an NP are 20 – 35 percent lower in cost than physician driven visits, without compromise in quality outcomes.  Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers presently reimburse NPs at rates that are 75-85 percent of the physician rate. As Healthcare costs continue to increase, utilization of NPs in care is a viable and responsible way to help bring costs down.

Presently, there is legislation pending on Beacon Hill, which will remove barriers impeding Nurse Practitioners’ ability to practice to the full extent of their training and education. H.2451/S.1257, An Act to Contain Health Care Costs and Improve Access to Value Based Nurse Practitioner Care as Recommended by the IOM and FTC, will modernize Massachusetts licensure laws and grant Full Practice Authority to Nurse Practitioners in Massachusetts, thus removing the requirement for physician oversight for NP prescriptive practice. In doing so, NPs will be better positioned to respond to the evolving care delivery needs of the Commonwealth.  Increased access to basic healthcare, specialty services and opioid use disorder treatment all mean significant cost savings for the Commonwealth.

As registered nurses with advanced master’s or doctoral level education and national certification in advanced practice nursing specialties, Nurse Practitioners have the knowledge and experience needed to deliver high-quality, cost-effective healthcare to patients.

Stephanie Ahmed, DNP, FNP-BC

Chair of the Massachusetts Coalition of Nurse Practitioners’ Legislative Committee and Former MCNP President

Donna Hanson, MS ANP, BC, MGH Emergency Medicine

Resident, Wintrhop, MA

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Community Preservation Committee Announced

Community Preservation Committee Announced

The newly established Community Preservation Committee will lead Chelsea’s use of funds provided by the Community Preservation Act (CPA).

Chelsea voters approved the adoption of the CPA in November 2016.  It will provide hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to be used for the creation and acquisition of affordable housing, historic preservation, open space and recreation.

Nine members appointed to the Community Preservation Committee are: Bea Cravatta, Judith Dyer, Caroline Ellenbird, Jose Iraheta, Michelle Lopez, Yahya Noor, Ron Robinson, Juan Vega, and Tuck Willis. Five members, by statute, represent City boards and commissions. The remaining four members are appointed by the Chelsea City Manager with the following requirements for each of the seats: one seat requires expertise in open spaces, housing and/or historical preservation; one seat requires expertise in development, business, finance, and/or construction; and the two remaining seats will be for individuals with a history of community involvement.

Community Preservation Committee (CPC) members serve a three-year term in a volunteer capacity, and must be residents of Chelsea. The CPC’s primary responsibilities include: approving an administrative budget for the City’s Community Preservation program; developing an annual Community Preservation Plan; reviewing project applications and making recommendations for funding approval. Further, CPC members are required to meet with regularity and engage with community groups throughout the City as needed.

The Committee is organized by John DePriest, AICP, Director, City of Chelsea Department of Planning and Development. An RFP has been prepared to hire a Professional Planning consultant services to develop the Community Preservation Plan. The Community Preservation Committee solicits and reviews proposals for use of the Community Preservation Act funds and  makes recommendations on how funds should be used. The funding of any project requires a recommendation from the committee.

For more information go to:  https://www.chelseama.gov/community-preservation-committee.

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Albanese Upset Over Council’s Cut

Albanese Upset Over Council’s Cut

Saying he is disappointed with the Council’s posture toward the Fire Department during last week’s successful $100,000 budget cut to his department, Chief Len Albanese said the Council missed an opportunity to help bring the Department forward.

The Council, particularly Council President Damali Vidot, called for the cut and said the Fire Department overtime budget had requested an increase. She and others felt like that number – which in the past has been described as being abused – should be doing down.

Albanese said it wasn’t fair, and he said he Council hasn’t listened to his calls for an appropriate percentage of funding and more staffing.

“I’m disappointed with the cut that was made and the comments made by Council President Vidot,” he said. “This year we made budget. I told the Council that if they properly funded the Fire Department we would do our best to live within that range, and we delivered. We require no supplemental funding to finish the year.

“I have advocated for more staffing since my first month on the job,” he continued. “We have acquired both the staffing and apparatus to make that happen. Now, we need this additional staffing to translate into more boots on the ground daily. If the recent fire on John Street is not indication enough of that, I’m not sure what is. These major fires in our densely populated neighborhoods are a significant threat to our community. We need as much help as possible in the first 10 minutes of these fires to protect our neighborhoods.”

He said the John Street fire was one where they lucked out because had other calls been going, the staffing might not have been there to respond correctly.

“We are lucky that all of our apparatus was available at the time of that alarm and not tied up on other calls,” he said. “I assure you, the devastation would have been much worse. Twenty homeless could have been 100. We cannot count on luck. We need to be prepared with a reasonable amount of protection based on the threat that we face.”

In 2016, Albanese presented to the Council that the Fire Department budget is around 6.25 percent of the overall budget, and national standard indicate it should be between 6.5-7 percent based on the call volumes.

This year, they would be 6.25 percent and that represents less percentage-wise than in 2016.

“Our overall budget represents only 6.25 percent of the overall City Budget which is actually less percentage wise than we received in 2016,” he said. “Even when you consider that we will eventually take over the new hire salaries in full, we will still be between 6.5 and 6.75 percent of total budget, well within a reasonable and acceptable range.”

For his overtime request, he said he requested a 4 percent increase to the current year’s $1.25 million overtime budget. That, he said, is because salaries increased by 4 percent and so there would be less overtime coverage.

“It’s one thing to hold the line, but to cut our entire request, plus an additional $50,000 that we had this year makes no sense,” he said. “It’s like saying thanks but no thanks.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said he believes the chief can make things work despite the cut.

“I was opposed to that cut,” he said. “I think the chief can make his overtime and salaries work. He has some open positions. There are three now…Hopefully he’ll make it and if he can’t, I’ll have to come to the council in the spring and ask for more money.”

Albanese said the cut won’t stop them from carrying out their plan, but it does no one any favors.

“The $100,000 cut will not keep us from continuing on our plan to increase daily staffing, but it doesn’t help,” he said. “With the amount of information we have provided the council, I think those members who voted to support this cut missed an opportunity to show their commitment to protecting our neighborhoods. The $100,000 is literally one-half of 1 percent of the City Budget, but it can translate into having an extra firefighter searching for a trapped occupant. To me, that’s money well spent.”

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City Expected to Begin Design on Beacham Street in July

City Expected to Begin Design on Beacham Street in July

The City will begin design of a major rehabilitation of Beacham Street in the New England Produce Center area from Spruce Street to the Everett line, said City Planner Alex Train.

That comes due to the fact that the City was just recently awarded an unexpected $3 million grant for the project from the federal Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration.

Train said the City has proposed a $5 million capital investment in the project for the Fiscal Year 2020 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP), giving them $8 million total to complete the project.

He said they will begin as soon as they can.

“We are excited to get this started,” said Train. “We are scheduled to start design and engineering on July 1. We will hopefully break ground on construction July 1, 2019. I expect there would be a three-year construction timeline. During that time and before, we will be coordinating with abutters, residents and businesses.”

The plan includes completely repurposing the roadway from a predominantly industrial truck route to a major automobile/pedestrian/cyclist east-west corridor throughway.

That will mean it will get a new surface, a new roadway, a new sidewalk on one side, a shared-use path on the southerly side with a buffered bike/pedestrian path, stormwater/drainage improvements, new lighting, new street trees, new signals at the intersection of Spruce and Williams Streets.

In addition, Train said they are working with the City of Everett to coordinate the design so that the Everett project matches the Chelsea project.

“They will be mimicking our design so there will be a contiguous and similar cyclable and walkable roadway from Chelsea to Everett,” he said.

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DiDomenico Delivers for Chelsea in FY19 Budget

DiDomenico Delivers for Chelsea in FY19 Budget

Sen. Sal DiDomenico and his colleagues in the Massachusetts Senate recently passed a $41.49 billion budget for Fiscal Year 2019, including targeted investments to create opportunities and ensure access to the tools that individuals, children and families need to succeed in the economy and in their communities. This budget invests in key areas related to education, local aid, health and human services, housing, and tools for low income families.

“After careful deliberation, the Senate has passed a thoughtful budget that both reflects the shared priorities of our chamber and addresses the pressing needs of our communities,” said Sen. DiDomenico, Assistant Majority Leader of the Massachusetts Senate. “This budget includes key investments in many of my top priority items that will have a positive and direct impact on Chelsea, and I am happy to report that all of my amendments providing additional resources for our community were adopted to the final Senate budget. I would like to thank Senate Ways & Means Chairwoman Karen Spilka and Senate President Harriette Chandler for all of their great work to craft a budget that will undoubtedly help to move our entire Commonwealth forward.”

The budget invests significantly in education for people of all ages and backgrounds and focuses particularly on elementary and secondary education, including $4.91B for the Chapter 70 education formula, its highest level ever. This funding allows for a minimum aid increase of $30 per pupil for every school district across the state and 100% effort reduction to bring all school districts to their target local contribution. Under the Senate budget, Chelsea would receive $77.4M in Chapter 70 funds- $4.3M more than they received in state funding last fiscal year.

Additionally, this budget takes much needed steps to offset the cost to some school districts-like Chelsea and Everett- of educating economically disadvantaged students and allows these districts to more accurately count their students. In recent years, many Gateway City school districts have faced dire budget gaps due to a 2015 change in the way the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) calculates low-income or “economically disadvantaged” students. This count plays a key role in the Chapter 70 formula that determines the amount of funding school districts receive from the state.

As a result of this change, only students who are registered for social welfare programs like SNAP and Medicaid are categorized as economically disadvantaged, missing thousands of additional low-income students who are not accessing social services. However, under the Senate budget, communities will be allowed to choose their preferred method of counting economically disadvantaged students, thereby ensuring that Chelsea is able to count all of their students.

“I am thrilled that this change has been included in the FY19 Senate budget,” said DiDomenico. “This is a solution that I have long been advocating for, and I am confident this will have a major impact on the amount of Chapter 70 funding schools in my district will receive and will go a long way towards remedying the fiscal challenges that our local schools have been facing.”

As Assistant Majority Leader of the Massachusetts Senate, Sen. DiDomenico was able to secure a number of amendments providing additional funding for his local communities. In total, the Senator secured an additional $100K for the Chelsea community:

  • $25,000 CONNECT, a financial opportunity center in the city of Chelsea
  • $75,000 for a youth social worker in the Chelsea Public Schools

This budget also invests in programs and advances policies to encourage self-sufficiency and economic mobility for low income families, providing them with the tools to secure their essential needs and develop skills to join the workforce. Policy changes include:

  • Sen. DiDomenico’s bill to eliminate the family cap- a failed and outdated policy that denies Department of Transitional Assistance benefits to children conceived while the family was receiving assistance.
  • An increase in the child clothing allowance to $350 per child- a $50 perchild increase over FY18- to help families secure their basic needs
  • An increase in the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) state match to 30% of the federal credit

Other top priority items for Sen. DiDomenico that were included in the Fiscal Year 2019 Senate Budget and will benefit Chelsea residents are:

  • $3.8 million for the state’s pediatric palliative care network to ensure there is no wait list for these critical services so children and their families have the extra care and support that they need;
  • $319.3 million to fully fund the Special Education Circuit Breaker;
  • $100 million to reimburse school districts for costs incurred when students leave to attend charter schools;
  • $8.7 million for Childcare Resource and Referral Centers to boost salaries and decrease caseloads for caseworkers helping parents, childcare providers, employers and community groups navigate the state’s early education landscape;
  • $4 million for Youth-At-Risk Matching grants, including support for YWCAs, YMCAs and Boys & Girls Clubs;
  • $33.4 million for adult basic education services to improve access to skills and tools necessary to join the workforce;
  • $10.3 million for summer jobs and work-readiness training for at-risk youth;
  • $16 million for the Massachusetts Cultural Council to support local arts, culture and creative economy initiatives;
  • $16.2 million for local Councils on Aging to strengthen programs and services in senior centers in communities across the state;
  • $142.9 million for a range of substance abuse treatment, intervention and recovery support services, including funding to open five new recovery centers; and
  • $18.5 million for Residential Assistance for Families in Transition (RAFT), including $3 million to expand eligibility to include persons with disabilities, seniors, unaccompanied youth and individuals.

A Conference Committee will now work out the differences between the Senate budget and the version passed by the House of Representatives in April. Fiscal Year 2019 begins on July 1.

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Residency Ordinance for Police, Fire Hires Holds Firm at Council

Residency Ordinance for Police, Fire Hires Holds Firm at Council

A last ditch effort by Councillor Roy Avellaneda to reverse the new police and fire residency ordinance successfully passed by Councillor Giovanni Recupero failed on Monday night, June 4, in a close vote.

It represented seven years of twists and turns for Recupero’s number one issue and one that has been before the Council in several forms about a dozen times.

On Monday, the victory came in a narrow defeat of Avellaneda’s proposal, 5-6, which allowed the proposal to become the new law.

Those voting to keep the residency ordinance were Councillors Damali Vidot, Enio Lopez, Bob Bishop, Luis Tejada, Joe Perlatonda and Recupero – a one vote margin of victory.

Those voting to reconsider and repeal the ordinance were Councillors Yamir Rodriguez, Calvin Brown, Avellaneda, Leo Robinson and Judith Garcia.

“This is a good thing,” said Recupero. “It’s something the citizens of Chelsea wanted and I’ve fought for it for seven years solid. Now the councillors wanted it too. I think it’s good for the City and for the people. The police and fire can live in the neighborhood and understand the people and the people can understand them and respect them. The young men and women of the city will relate to them because they live in the same community.”

The matter will apply to anyone hired in the Police or Fire Department after July 31, 2018. It will require them to live in Chelsea for five years after starting on the job. After five years, they can move out of the city if they choose.

The negative came in that to get the measure, it had to become a collective bargaining issue. That meant that the entire Police and Fire Departments would get a raise in order to include the new condition in their contracts. Even those for whom the measure doesn’t apply will get additional pay to accept the new condition.

“Hey, it’s good for those on the department too,” said Recupero. “They’re all going to get a raise, but we’re going to get new officers that want to live in Chelsea.”

Councillor Leo Robinson said he was against the measure because of the cost. He said he was once in favor of residency, but that changed when he learned about the collective bargaining costs.

“The bottom line is you have 40 police living in the city and 26 firefighters right now,” he said. “ When we have to go and negotiate with the union that means 110 police and 96 firefighters get raises. That’s $200,000 we’ll have to give them. I think it’s foolish to do. They think it’s a great thing. You have Bob Bishop voting against the budget because he says it out of control and then he votes for this without knowing what it costs.”

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Top 100 City Salary Earners Dominated by Public Safety Employees

Top 100 City Salary Earners Dominated by Public Safety Employees

The Top 100 City employee earners list (below) from 2017 was released this week and it showed that, as has become routine, that it is dominated by police and fire personnel.

A total of 41 of the top 100 came from the Police Department, though it should be noted that some of those earnings come from paid details which aren’t paid for in total by City funds. In the Fire department, 31 members were on the Top 100 list. That rounded out 72 police and fire earners in the Top 100.

The School Department came in third with 24 members on the Top 100 list, but most of them falling in the bottom one-third of that list.

The highest paid City employee in 2017 was Chief Brian Kyes, who said he was grateful for being able to serve as chief in his hometown. He made $219,752 in 2017 – the first year that he did not work details as the chief.

“My current salary is based on an employment contract that was negotiated between the City Manager and myself last year in an effort to allow me to finish my career here in Chelsea,” he said. “Based on the terms of the contract I have agreed to serve as the Police Chief for an additional five-year term and continue to do the job that I absolutely love. Although there are lucrative opportunities beyond the borders of our city whether in the legal world or public safety, my commitment remains here in the city of Chelsea.”

Kyes said his is now beginning his 32nd year with the Chelsea Police, with the last 11 as chief. He said others have recruited him from outside the city and state, but he has decided to stay here under his new contract.

“Over the past few years I have been recruited by other agencies both within Massachusetts and outside the state to either lead or compete to run their departments,” he said. “I have also had offers from the private sector as well.  This all being said I honestly know that there is no police department like the one that we have here in Chelsea with the enduring partnerships that serve as the life-blood of our agency. This is in no small part to the dedication and commitment of the men and women, sworn and non-sworn who make up our department.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino appeared at number eight on the list, making $180,209. He said the list is dominated by police and fire because they work hard for their money in Chelsea.

“Public safety officials are paid good money and in this city they earn it,” he said. “This a difficult city to be a police officer and a firefighter. They put their lives on the line all the time. I don’t begrudge the salaries they earn. They work hard for it here.”

Name                                                     Job                                    Location                      Gross Pay

Kyes, Brian                                     Chief of Police                     Police Department               219,752.46

Fern, Joseph                                        Sergeant                          Police Department               205,227.09

Dunn, Thomas                        Captain  Police Department            Police Department               203,853.47

Batchelor, David                     Captain  Police Department            Police Department               196,668.15

Quatier, John T                                Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 194,200.46

Houghton, Keith E                  Captain  Police Department            Police Department               191,969.00

Dana, William J                     Captain  Police Department            Police Department               183,002.94

Ambrosino, Thomas  G                     City Manager                    City Managers Office             180,209.33

Bourque, Mary                             Superintendent 225               Superintendent’s Office            178,697.92

Houghton, Robert                             Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 171,818.69

Delaney,  Daniel                   Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               167,164.94

Moschella, Robert  F                           Patrolman                         Police Department               166,551.53

Addonizio,  Michael J                           Sergeant                          Police Department               165,570.61

Giancola,  Paul R                              Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 159,609.20

Krasco, William N                              Patrolman                         Police Department               159,422.55

Eaves, Paul                                      Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,387.51

Cameron, Robert  T                          Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,286.42

McGarry, Edward J                          Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 157,039.03

Masucci,  Michael  F                         Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 155,518.72

Conley, Scott                                      Patrolman                         Police Department               155,203.52

Purcell, Stephen M                 Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 153,053.03

Albanese, Leonard  A                          Fire Chief                          Fire Department                 152,062.60

Nelson, Edwin                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               151,547.85

McCue, Gerald A                           Director Exempt                      Business Office                  149,881.45

Thompson, Michael                   Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 147,058.30

Doherty, Paul W                      Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 146,525.98

Abell, Lyle Robert                              Patrolman                         Police Department               146,403.33

Denning,  Robert                      Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 146,005.01

Gurska,  Michael P                   Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 145,917.85

Brizuela,  William F                             Sergeant                          Police Department                I45,799.72

Carroccino, Richard                  Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 143,729.68

Noftle, John                                        Sergeant                          Police Department               143,399.35

D’alba, Anthony  F                               Sergeant                          Police Department               142,601.43

Rizzuto, David M                  Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,577.35

McLain, Thomas  H               Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,257.64

Dunn, Brlan A                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               142,075.70

Flibotte,  David A                                Sergeant                          Police Department               139,282.59

Breau, Linda                          Deputy/Asst. Superintendent       Curriculum & Instruction          138,723.52

Johari, Priti                                     Principal  220                    Chelsea High School              137,504.49

Betz, David K                       Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               136,752.02

Merritt,  Philips                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 135,078.38

Bevere  Maloney, Jacqueline             Principal  220                   Early Learning Center             134,399.98

Gonzalez,  Hector  L                             Sergeant                          Police Department               134,150.63

Tarraza,  Luis 0                                   Patrolman                         Police Department               132,435.96

Keefe, Edward P                         Deputy City Manager              City Managers Office             131,692.35

Ulwick, Wayne                                 Deputy Chief                        Fire Department                 131,310.43

Lubarsky,  Adele                              Principal 220                     Edgar Hooks School              130,524.94

Ramirez,  Emilio                                Patrolman                         Police Department               130,435.94

Wilcox, Richard J                   Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 129,511.67

Nee, Michaela                                      Sergeant                          Police Department               129,262.60

Tiro, Anthony J                      Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 127,929.36

Lee, Michael W                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 127,554.60

Gobin, Rony R                         Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 126,838.72

Rogers, Philip R                       Captain  Fire Department               Fire Department                 126,715.84

Rosenberg, Cindy D                          Director/Sped                Special  Education  Office          126,704.50

Bower, John C                      Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               126,621.69

Lam,Longt                                         Patrolman                         Police Department               126,017.51

Torres, Jose                                        Firefighter                          Fire Department                 126,016.67

Grajal, Randy A                                   Teacher                         Edgar Hooks School              125,460.58

O’Brien, Joanne  M                             Patrolman                         Police Department               122.517.49

Bellomo,  Richard  R                           Patrolman                         Police Department               122,434.05

Barber.  Linda                       Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              122,340.06

Andreottola, Miguel                   Director- Admin Union           Information Technology           122,263.17

Martinello, Michelle                          Principal 220                   Eugene  Wright School            121,300.01

Schmidt,  Ronald L                Assistant  Principal 220 Days         Chelsea High School              120,863.05

Bevere, Joseph                                     Sergeant                          Police Department               120,723.24

DeleiDi, Adam  M                            Principal 220               William A Berkowitz School        119,725.05

Sanchez-Gleason, Magdalena             Principal 220                     George Kelly School              119,725.05

Chung, Starn                                      Patrolman                         Police Department               119,622.05

Fisher, Cheryl  W                             City Solicitor                       Law Department                 118,212.79

Kent, Sarah A                             Assistant  Super 220              Superintendent’s Office            118,180.01

Casucci,  Augustus  M                         Patrolman                         Police Department               118,042.21

Talbot, Michael                                Principal  220                   Clark Avenue  School             117,799.89

Noone, Michael J                                Patrolman                         Police Department               117,652.42

Sanchez, Miguel                    Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               117,208.79

Crowley, Kevin M                  Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 116,736.44

Griffin, Robert  E                 Lieutenant Police Department           Police Department               116,607.77

Perisie, Rjchard                        Captain Fire Department                Fire Department                 116,068.89

Almquist-Cevallos, Kristen L  Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              115,766.02

Cooney, Joseph F               Director Of Buildings & Grounds      Buildings & Grounds             115,378.83

Maldonado, Jonathan                           Patrolman                         Police Department               114,386.68

Valdes, Reinaldo                                 Firefighter                          Fire Department                 113,953.54

Dent, Sarah E                        Assistant Principal 220 Days          Chelsea High School              113,563.97

Rodriguez, Luis R                               Patrolman                         Police Department               113,325.68

Vazquez, Sylvia E                                Teacher                         George Kelly School              113,032.18

Ostler, Ryan P                                    Patrolman                         Police Department               112,945.35

Glass, Carter R                       Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,886.11

Conlon, Joseph                       Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,711.04

Stutto, Joseph C                                  Patrolman                         Police Department               112,582.33

Peters, Albert W                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 112,509.80

Griffin, Kevin M                   Assistant Principal 205 Days      Joseph A. Browne School          112,400.07

Shea. Julie C                                    Principal 220                 Joseph A. Browne School          112,196.08

Davis, Cove J                              Assistant Super 200               Superintendents Office            112,086.00

Meyers, Nathaniel S                          Principal 220               Frank M. Sokolowski School        111,946.05

Caissie, Arthur J                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 111,895.39

Taverna. Bertram                     Director Of Public Works                  Admin dpw                    111,811.66

Vega. Carlos J                                    Patrolman                         Police Department               111,585.26

Aliberti, Mark A                     Lieutenant Fire Department              Fire Department                 111,494.68

Lawlor, John W                      Lieutenant Fire Department               Fire Department                              111,374.27

Garcia, Stephen  Patrolman                         Police Department              111,132.25

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City Leaders, Community Rejoices with Ban of Alcohol Nip Bottles

City Leaders, Community Rejoices with Ban of Alcohol Nip Bottles

The bottles are little, but their size does not hide the volume of litter they create, nor the public drunkenness they spark.

And so it is, the License Board and City leaders worked together with Chelsea Police recently to ban alcohol nip bottles (1.7 oz. plastic bottle liquor shots) that litter the City’s streets and are believed to be a major cause of the open drinking in Bellingham Square and other locales.

The decision came down on May 22 with a 4-0 vote, with the impetus for the ban coming from City Councillor (and former License Commissioner) Roy Avellaneda. The measure not goes to the state Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission (ABCC) for final approval, but it is expected to meet muster there.

License Commissioner Roseann Bongiovanni said it was quite a coup for the City to make this step.

“The licensing board took a big step forward in trying to crack down on the proliferation of public drinking and drunkenness by banning the sales of nips throughout the entire city,” she said. “We will also be discussing banning the sale of pints of alcohol and single beer cans at our upcoming meeting in June.  I’d like to thank Captain Houghton, Officer McLaughlin and the full CPD team who made a robust presentation about how alcohol abuse is far more problematic in Chelsea than heroin addiction is, yet the latter gets so much more attention. I also offer our deep gratitude to Gladys Valentin from CAPIC who spoke about the efforts she is leading to curb substance abuse and help those with addiction get the services they need.”

Avellaneda said he had always wanted to ban nips when he was on licensing, but was told it couldn’t be done legally. However, he said he read an article about Everett banning nips recently, and decided it was time to revisit the issue.

He wrote a letter to the License Commission, and once new Chair Mark Rossi took the reins, he scheduled the hearing – which took place on May 22.

“This alcohol abuse in public has been going on since I was a kid and I walked back and forth from St. Rose School and my dad’s baker on Broadway,” said Avellaneda. “You have to go the point of the source and we believe part of the problem is the sale of these nips. We hope this is a first step. We also want to stop the sale of single-cans of beer. I think anyone who wants a single serving can get that in a bar instead of in a brown bag on a park bench…This is about cleaning up the downtown and making it more family friendly and business friendly.”

Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes said the Department has been pushing for the ban for many years.

“This extremely important decision by the Chelsea Licensing Board is a huge step forward…,” he said. “For well over a decade the Police Department has been pushing for the elimination of sales of these so-called ‘nips’ – comprised of 1.7 ounces of alcohol – and single cans or bottles of malt beverages from our local licensed liquor and convenience stores. Far too often we have made observations of individuals in an inebriated state in the area of Bellingham and Chelsea Square because of the overconsumption of these particular alcoholic beverages. They have secreted the containers in their clothing only to be tossed in the street after their use. This local measure should go a long way towards reducing open air intoxication in our vibrant downtown neighborhoods.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino also supported the measure, saying it will help solve part of a long-standing problem.

“I think the impact on the downtown will be very positive,” he said. “We have an issue with litter and alcohol consumption in public. This is one of many positive steps we’re trying to address the problem.”

Avellaneda said it could end up helping the stores that depend on the sales of nips.

“We may see an environment created downtown that helps these stores in terms of sales in a different way to a different clientele,” he said. “Maybe they will increase their sales to other customers and that could make up the difference.”

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