Enhanced Google Maps, Lime Integration Sets Sight on Improving City Commutes

Google Maps will begin displaying available Lime scooters in more than 100 cities around the world. On Android devices, users will be able to see if a Lime vehicle is available, how long it’ll take to walk to the vehicle, a price estimate of the ride, battery range, along with total journey time and ETA in the Google Maps app. iOS availability for this feature will launch in late August.

In the Metro-Boston area, Lime riders have taken close to a half million rides on its bikeshare program and over 60,000 rides on its scooter program. Lime bikes are available Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, Newton, Quincy, Watertown, and Winthrop. Lime scooters are available in Brookline.

“This integration will help unlock an even easier way to explore their cities and reduce commute times,” said Scott Mullen, Director of Northeast Expansion at Lime. “Lime believes in the gift of time, and our scooters offer a convenient and fun way of cutting through Metro-Boston congestion. We’re excited that this partnership with Google Maps provides the opportunity for Lime to connect people to their destination faster as scooters continue to become a core part of the transportation ecosystem in the Bay State.”

If available, users will see Lime vehicles as an option from their biking, walking and transit tab if they’re traveling a relatively short distance that may also be accessible via scooter. Google Maps will show information about the nearest Lime, such as: if a Lime vehicle is available, how long it’ll take to walk to the vehicle, an estimate of how much the ride will cost, battery range, total journey time and ETA. Users can tap on a Lime in the Google Maps app, and Google Maps will show information about the selected vehicle.

Finally, Google Maps will show a walking route to the selected Lime vehicle and bicycling route for the rest of the journey in the biking tab.

“Whether you’re planning your daily commute or traveling to a new city, Google Maps is making it easier to weigh all your transportation options with real-time information,” said Vishal Dutta, Product Manager, Google Maps. “In addition to showing you the best biking and transit route in Google Maps, you’ll now be able to see if Lime scooters or e-bikes are available, how long the trip will take, and the most efficient route to get there. From Stockholm to Sao Paulo, you can now use Google Maps to locate Lime scooters to get you to your destination.”

Lime scooters first surfaced in Google Maps in December 2018 and the two companies expanded the partnership to 80 more cities in March 2019.

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Thank You, Bruce Harrison is Leaving REACH After 12 Years of Service

Bruce Harrison has been a championship coach and a champion for Chelsea’s youth since his days in the Chelsea Youth Basketball League at the old Chelsea High gymnasium on Clark Avenue.

For the past 12 years, Harrison has been a group leader at the Chelsea REACH after-school program led by Executive Director Linda Alioto-Robinson.

REACH Executive Director Linda Alioto-Robinson thanks Bruce Harrison for his 12 years of outstanding service.

“We help students to stay in school, graduate, go to college or trade school, or get a job,” said the 57-year-old Harrison, a 1981 CHS graduate, the father of three children and grandfather of two.

Harrison announced this week that he will be leaving REACH to take a position in the Chelsea school system.

“I’m going to be working in school security,” he related. “I’m sad about leaving. I like the REACH program and helping kids. But I’m doing it for my family.”

Robinson-Alioto said that Harrison was a valuable member of the REACH staff.

“We’re going to miss Bruce a lot – he’s the best group leader ever,” lauded Robinson-Alioto. “But we’re all happy for him for his new job. It’s a full-time position and he’s a father and a husband and you need a full-time job. REACH was just part time, so we’re happy for him and we’re happy that he’ll still be in Chelsea.”

Harrison was busy with REACH Monday running the annual Lemonade Stand fundraiser at the Stop & Shop store. Proceeds went to REACH and the St. Luke’s Church Food Pantry. Sean O’Regan and his brother, James O’Regan Jr. donated the supplies for the lemonade stand.

Harrison has coached in the Chelsea Youth Basketball League for many years. He led the Bucks team to multiple championships alongside assistant coach Leo Robinson. Many observers felt that “Brucie” was at the top of the list of legendary coaches of the 1980s that included Larry Notkin, Steve Selbovitz, Gerry Godin, Ronald Robinson, Mark Zamansky, Steve Fried, and Dave Drinan.

Harrison was honored at an event earlier this year as the Boston Boys and Girls Club “Volunteer of the Year” for his coaching efforts at the Jordan Boys and Girls Club (JGBC), Chelsea.

Josh Kraft, CEO of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston and the former executive director of the JGBC, made the presentation to Harrison at the ceremony held at Fenway Park.

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GreenStar Herbals Gets Planning Board Approval; Will Head to ZBA in August

A retail marijuana shop is one step closer to opening at the site of the former King Arthur’s strip club at 200 Beacham St.

Tuesday night, the Planning Board approved the site plan for the 3,800-square-foot facility by a 7-1 vote. The board also recommended that the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) grant a special permit for the proposal when it comes before that board on Aug. 13.

Planning Board member Mimi Rancatore cast the lone vote against the project, citing traffic concerns.

Rancatore noted that she has heard from drivers from the neighboring New England Produce Market who are concerned about the additional traffic on the site.

“Twenty to 30 additional cars per hour is still a lot,” said Rancatore. “There is a lot of traffic on that road, and it is very close to the casino in Everett.”

Representatives from GreenStar Herbals, the company proposing the pot shop, said they have worked closely with City officials and the police to alleviate traffic concerns at 200 Beacham St.

The revised plan brought before the Planning Board includes clearly defined entrances and traffic flow in the parking lot, as well as an appointment system for customers that will limit the number of customers at the store at any one time.

But Rancatore noted that the appointment system is only required for the first month of operation. City Planning Director John DePriest countered that any changes to GreenStar’s approved plans will have to come back before the Planning Board for approval.

Unlike the Dunkin (Donuts) next door, there will not be significant spikes in traffic at the shop during the day, according to traffic consultant Jeffrey Dirk of Vanasse and Associates.

“Any use on the site will generate traffic,” said Dirk. “But the nature of this use is not a significant traffic generator.”

City Manager Thomas Ambrosino spoke in favor of the project, stating it is a major improvement over the current condition of the property.

“In terms of the use, it is a strong proposal to revitalize this property with this use,” said Ambrosino. “It’s been a problem for the city for the four years that I have been City Manager, and probably for a generation before that. We have fought to keep that property from continuing as an adult-entertainment venue.”

Ambrosino said the adult-use recreational marijuana facility is the best the City can hope for at that property.

“Given all the other potential uses for the site, this proposal makes a lot of sense for the City,” he said.

GreenStar originally came before the city with a proposal for 200 Beacham St., but withdrew that proposal to make adjustments more in line with suggestions from City officials and residents.

GreenStar representatives noted that the new building will be an improvement over the existing two-story building on the property.

The new building will be one-story as opposed to two, and will be set further back from the road than the King Arthur building.

There will also be improved landscaping and traffic flow on the site, according to GreenStar officials.

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Paddle Night a Hit as People Flock to Float on the Creek

A few years ago, kayaking and canoeing on the Chelsea Creek was a novel – and to some a dangerous – proposition for those in Chelsea.

However, after more and more have taken their turn at the paddle, the idea of getting on the water has become relatively normal – and fun.

The proof was in the paddle last Thursday night, June 27, when GreenRoots hosted their annual Paddle Night on the Marginal Street pier – and lines of residents waited their turn patiently to get a chance to paddle around in a kayak or canoe on the Creek.

AHOY! Kimberly Vasquez holds on tight to the sides of the canoe while Jose Alvarez paddles to the dock on the Chelsea Creek last Thursday night, June 27 during the GreenRoots first Paddle Night of the season.
Scores of residents came to the pier on Marginal Street and lined up for their chance to take a canoe or kayak on the Creek. Also pictured were a few resident who paddled into the Creek and were framed by the Mystic/Tobin Bridge while navigating the waters.

GreenRoots Director Roseann Bongiovanni said it was the first of several Paddle Nights this year in Chelsea and East Boston – all an effort to normalize an activity that no one would have participated in 10 years ago.

“We are having these activities three times this summer in Chelsea and three times in East Boston,” she said. “We’re trying to get as many people out on the water as possible…The hope is that we’re attracting people from the neighborhood so they can come down. Many of them may have seen the water here for a long time, but didn’t know they could come on the water for recreation. Getting them out here on a beautiful Thursday evening give them hope they can do it more frequently.”

The biggest challenge of the night ended up being the fact that GreenRoots needed more boats to accommodate all of the young people and families that showed up to go out.

Jose Alvarado said it was the first time he had ever been on Chelsea Creek in a boat.

“I’ve seen it, but this was my first time ever going out there,” he said. “I will definitely do it again.”

Chelsea Paddle Nights this summer will be on Thursdays, July 25 and Aug. 15, starting at 5 p.m.

Kayaking in East Boston at 300 Condor St. will be on Saturdays, July 13 and Aug. 31, at 10 a.m.

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FRONT – 0096 AND 0123 –

AHOY! Kimberly Vasquez holds on tight to the sides of the canoe while Jose Alvarez paddles to the dock on the Chelsea Creek last Thursday night, June 27, during the GreenRoots first Paddle Night of the season. Scores of residents came to the pier on Marginal Street and lined up for their chance to take a canoe or kayak on the Creek. Also pictured were a few resident who paddled into the Creek and were framed by the Mystic/Tobin Bridge while navigating the waters.

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Paul Pivaral, Akanni Hernandez, Edgar Pivaral and Ann Moscoso ready to try their hand paddling on the Creek.

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John Walkey of GreenRoots was all smiles in his kayak, providing safety for the participants.

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David and Ivette Martinez paddle around the Creek.

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Kenya B. and Sydney B. took out the two-person kayak and found tranquil waters off the pier.

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On the pier were plenty of fun and games as well, with Catherine Paviola practicing her dribbling skills ahead of the Women’s World Cup matches last week.

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Karalyn and Eduardo Montes play a game of Connect Four on the pier.

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From the GreenRoots ECOYouth team: Bryan Hernandez, Skakaya Moore-Perkins, and Jary Perez.

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Stacking it up! Little Pamela Pineda gets the blocks just right for a tall tower.

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GreenRoots folks chillin’ on the pier at Paddle Night. (L-R) Maria Belen Power, Giselle Barahona, Noemy Rodriguez, Sarah Levy, Roseann Bongiovanni, and John Walkey.

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Rollins Speaks at Chamber of Commerce Luncheon

Suffolk County District Attorney announces community meeting in Chelsea on June 19

Rachael Rollins, the dynamic district attorney who became the first female elected to the esteemed Suffolk County position last November, was the guest speaker at the Chamber of Commerce Luncheon Wednesday at the Holiday Inn/Boston Logan Airport Chelsea.

Rollins proved to be as dynamic a speaker as she is a public official.

“The people that are most impacted negatively by the criminal justice system – it has nothing to do with race and almost everything to do with poverty,” Rollins told the luncheon audience. “If you can’t afford somebody who can navigate fluently through the criminal justice system – you are at a significant disadvantage.

“I don’t care what hue your skin is – if you have no money, the system does not work well for you, period, end of story,” said Rollins.

In well-received remarks, Rollins spoke about the DA’s mission as the chief law enforcement office of Suffolk County. She addressed serious issues such as the opioid crisis. She talked about the marijuana industry and law enforcement’s efforts in the field since recreational marijuana became legal in the state.

Chamber President Joseph Mahoney noted Rollins’ achievements as a Division 1 college athlete at UMass/Amherst. While at UMass, she challenged school leaders to increase the number of athletic scholarships given to female students.

Rollins also used the forum to make a major announcement: she will hold a community meeting on June 19 at 6 p.m. at the Chelsea Senior Center.

It is the second such quarterly meeting in the county following the inaugural session in Roxbury. It will be in the style of a state of the union/state of the city, followed by a question-and-answer session.

Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson and Chelsea Police Community Engagement Specialist Dan Cortez praised Rollins’ initiative to host a community meeting in the city.

“A community meeting on a regular basis is a great idea,” said Robinson, an early supporter of Rollins in her campaign for office. “It follows through on her pledge to be accessible and accountable to our residents. I expect to see a tremendous turnout of people welcoming her to Chelsea on June 19 and learning about the important role the DA’s Office has in our lives.”

Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes was a guest at the luncheon while Roca Assistant Director Jason Owens, who provided an overview of Roca’s efforts during brief remarks, led a delegation from the agency.

Rollins called on Kyes to elaborate on the challenges facing police officers in regard to the new marijuana laws.

“We have individuals in the state, police officers in the state who are known as drug recognition experts (DREs),” said Kyes. “There are only about 200 DREs out of 17,000 police officers, including the State Police. At the end of the day, when an officer sees somebody and they’re unsteady on their feet, bloodshot eyes – they could potentially get probable cause to make an arrest, but then without that DRE to do an added evaluation, when it goes to court, these individuals aren’t getting convicted.

“Right now, some judges will allow the testimony pf a DRE and some will not,” concluded Kyes.

Rollins’ remarks were videotaped by Chelsea Community Cable Television. Executive Director Robert Bradley said the luncheon will begin airing on the cable television station.

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New Chelsea Stadium Pegged to Be Completed by End of May

The new Chelsea Stadium is only a few weeks from being completed and put into use, school officials said this week.

The new track will be named after late teacher/track coach Bernard Berenson, who is in the state Coaches Hall of Fame.

Facilities Director Joe Cooney said the rainy weather has slowed down the surfacing of the track, but that most everything else in the long-awaited Stadium project is completed.

“We’re getting very close,” he said. “When it’s done, it’s going to look dynamite.”

The football field is completely done, he said, but the track has been tricky.

An overview of the new football field looks spectacular but getting the track down has been tricky in the recent rainy weather. The project began last summer and will be completed at the end of May.

Already there has been a base coat of asphalt put down, but the rubberized surface on the track cannot be placed down in the rain – which pretty much means it has been delayed for quite some due to the deluge that has been seen lately.

He said there are two layers of rubberized surface, and that when it is done, it will be a very fast track for the runners.

The only other things outstanding are the conduits for the lights, permanent bathrooms, and bleacher improvements.

He said they have to complete the project by early May because graduation is taking place on the new field on June 9.

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FBISpecial Agent in Charge Bonavolonta Wows the Audience at JGBC Breakfast

He had his audience totally engaged on every word, his knowledge so overwhelming, his delivery so confident and precise.

Breakfast Chair Mark Robinson, FBI Assistant Special Agent in Charge Kevin White, FBI Special Agent In Charge Joseph Bonavolonta, and Jordan Girls and Boys Club Executive Director Gina Centrella.

Joseph R. Bonavolonta, FBI special agent in charge of the Boston Field Office, was the guest speaker at the Jordan Boys and Girls Club Breakfast Series Tuesday and his remarks were so captivating that he received two other guest speaking invitations before he left the hall.

“It’s been an incredibly interestingly and enlightening morning – that was great,” said Breakfast Chair Mark Robinson at the conclusion of Bonavolonta’s remarks.

Bonavolonta took the guests on an up-close look at the vital work that the United States’ principal law enforcement agency does around the clock and how it affects people not only in this nation but around the world.

He began by illuminating “about the types of threats we’re facing in our AOR (Area of Responsibility),” which is the four-state region of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

He divided the subject matter between the categories of national security threats and criminal threats.

“I’ll start with pure national security, that’s really where we’re focusing on our counter-terrorism and counter-intelligence threats, two of the absolute top threats, not only here in our area, but also nationally,” said Bonavolonta.

He said the FBI is focusing on two types of counter-terrorism, international terrorism and domestic terrorism.

“International terrorism is where you have your historical terrorism threats, really pre-and-post 911: Al Qaeda and ISIS, They still are persistent. They still are significant threats for us, but the threat landscape in terrorism has really changed every year since September 11, 2001,” he said.

Bonavolonta noted that the primary threat here is Homegrown Violent Extremists (HVE). “What I mean by that, simply, are individuals who have been self-radicalized primarily over the Internet – it could be by other means as well. They go out and commit significant acts of violence against what we would call or they call to be soft targets: schools, shopping malls, any areas where there are public gatherings where you can potentially inflict mass casualties with the lowest amount of risk or immediate interaction with law enforcement.

“It’s something that concerns us every day,” said Bonavolonta.

He said the agency has to take each threat seriously and be very quick to react. “We’ve had cases right in our own area where we’ve had individuals that have one day woken up and they’re in that radicalization process and they’ve decided that today’s the day they’re going to go out and they’re going to attack or kill members of law enforcement or other individuals.

“These are threats that have to be acted on immediately and we have to ready to mobilize and cut them off before they commit these acts of violence,” he said.

Bonavolonta defined domestic terrorism “as individuals who are associated with or inspired by US-based movements that are promoting ‘violent extremist ideologies.”

He said what makes domestic terrorism a complex issue is “the fact that a lot of what we see in that realm potentials butts right up against First Amendment freedom of speech issues.

“That’s something that we really have to be incredibly careful when we’re looking at it. It’s a very, very high threshold for us to predicate a case where we’re charging acts related to domestic terrorism.

“In a lot of cases, these issues start with individuals that are spewing certain types of speech that are protected under First Amendment activities,” Bonovalonta clarified.

During the question-and-answer session that followed, Bonavolonta was asked about FBI resources, hiring and personnel.

He said the FBI is always looking for “cyber-talented people with a true background in cyber skills.”

“And nationally we are making a significant push for much more aggressive recruitment – we are aggressively recruiting people with skills in the STEM field,” said Bonavalonta. “We are placing a specific emphasis on recruiting females into the agent cadre as well. We need to make sure that from a diversity perspective that our agent cadre, as much as it can, mirrors overall society. And just within the last three or four years, there has been a very definitive effort to proactively put on female law enforcement symposiums.”

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CHS Concert Band, Cantare Win Big at Music in the Parks Festival

The Chelsea High Concert Band and Cantare Choir gave yet another reason why it should be considered the best urban – or suburban – music program in the state, taking home numerous awards at last weekend’s Music in the Parks Festival.

The Festival took place at the Westfield South Middle School and Westfield High School, and typically ends with an awards ceremony and fun day at Six Flags New England. However, due to the inclement weather, the Chelsea musicians had to be content with simply taking home some of the top prizes in the state.

Cantare Director Pete Pappavaselio and Concert Band Director Shannon Sullivan reported that both groups did outstanding at the Festival.

The CHS Percussion Ensemble took first place and received the highest adjudicated score of all of the ensembles present that day, with a score of 98 (out of 100) and a rating of Superior.

The CHS Band received a rating of Excellent and placed fourth overall.

The CHS Cantare received also received a rating of Excellent and came in third place, and the CHS Choir received a rating of Superior and came in second place. Additionally, Dimas Villanueva was recognized as the Best Student Accompanist of the competing ensembles and received an award for his guitar playing on “California Dreamin'” and “Blackbird.”

The CHS Band’s next performance will be on Memorial Day at City Hall, at a ceremony which begins at 9 a.m. All of these ensembles will be performing at Arts Night Out, which is the combined year-end event with the Visual Arts Department. That celebration is on Fri., May 31, with the art gallery opening at 6 p.m., and the concert beginning at 7 p.m. Viewing the art gallery is free, and tickets to the concert are $4.

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An Elite College Athlete, DA Rollins Got a Taste of the Law and Never Turned Back

New Suffolk County DA Rachael Rollins has quickly come to be known as an agent of change, a passionate advocate for equity in the law and a solid leader ready to stand up for a cause – but few know that before all that she was an elite Division 1 college athlete, and it was on the playing field where she first gained her love and respect for the law.

Rollins grew up in a large family in Cambridge, and sports were part of her family from the beginning, long before she ever thought of the legal system.

Rollins said she was a team captain of every sport she played going back to youth soccer, and an All-Scholastic in basketball at Buckingham, Brown & Nichols School (BB&N), but it was on the lacrosse field where she was the most outstanding. The sport – which was somewhat newer to New England in the 1980s when she was in high school – was fast moving and, having been recruited to play after a basketball practice, Rollins had a great skill set to be a high achiever.

“I was the oldest of five siblings and my parents worked very hard to make sure we got a great education,” she said. “I got into BB&N after the third grade, but at one point my parents sat me down and told me I was a good athlete and a good student and needed to get a scholarship if I wanted to go to college.”

Her skills led her to a full Division 1 Scholarship to UMass-Amherst for lacrosse, this coming after winning a national championship on the high school level in 1989. After an outstanding freshman year, Rollins and her teammates were shocked to learn that their sport was being eliminated by the university due to budget cuts.

Though she was able to keep her scholarship, she said she eventually missed the athletic fields, and that’s when she and some other women athletes turned to the law – which she found to be a powerful leveler for those without much of a voice.

“At first, I was kind of relieved because I didn’t have to wake up at 5 a.m. for conditioning anymore, but later I began to miss sports,” she said. “I’d played sports my entire life and missed the camaraderie you feel when you have the team behind you and you score a goal.

“We only had three or four scholarship players and we were good,” she continued. “The men’s football team hadn’t won a game in years and they had 75 full-time scholarships with everything provided for them, including food and lodging. I didn’t know a lawyer or a judge, but it seemed so unfair. Myself ,and a few other athletes from the women’s teams, asked to meet with the Athletic Director.”

That meeting didn’t go so well, and there was no change, but DA Rollins said everything changed when they got a lawyer.

“Our lawyer threatened a Title 9 lawsuit,” she said. “The AD completely changed his tune. We got all or our teams re-instituted after a while.”

Rollins – who attended Northeastern University Law School after UMass – said it was her first taste at how the law can be used to empower and bring about justice.

And it was a powerful experience.

“I saw that lawyers matter and words matter,” she said. “As a young person, I thought, ‘Oh my God, lawyers are awesome.’ They make everyone fall into line and things change.”

It was the defining moment she points to after a long legal career with MassPort, the MBTA, and now as the Suffolk District Attorney, where the law became her passion.

However, when it came to leadership – another characteristic she said has been critical as the newly-elected DA in an office that has had the same leader for almost two decades – it was what happened after the teams were re-instated that taught her the most.

She said when the team was finally brought back, she was the only player left with any real experience. Most of the players and coaches had been plucked from other sports like track and volleyball. The elite athlete soon found herself the captain of a team that couldn’t win a game to save themselves.

Yet, she said it was the most important time of her life, leading a team that likely wasn’t going to win, but could still accomplish some goals in the meantime.

“It was one of the best learning experiences I ever had,” she said. “You show up with a smile on your face and give 100 percent even when things aren’t going well. It taught me character…Anyone can be present when things are going great, but where are you when things get hard? Do you still show up? I like to say it costs very little to pay someone a compliment or be respectful. Yet so few do it.”

That kind of optimism for a competitive person in the midst of a losing season was life changing.

“What’s beautiful is to learn not to be discouraged and to be optimistic,” she said. “Those are actually the years I broke records because the numbers of goals I scored. There are still records out there 26 or 27 years later that I set and I’m proud to say I still hold.”

Certainly, the end of her athletic career did not mean an end to those valuable lessons. In fact, she said, it has been sports that taught her about justice and leadership.

“We are breaking down barriers,” she said. “When you see a woman in leadership roles, it happens quite often that in the past that woman had some athletic ability or played some sport. It teaches us about inclusion or teamwork or perseverance. Sports doesn’t care about how much money you have or where you live, it’s about how well you perform on the field. It’s a great leveler. It’s been invaluable for me.”

And in the office, she is adjusting to being that new person who is also the leader of the office. That, she said, takes the kind of skills she honed on the athletic fields some years ago.

“I’m the new person to the team here in the DA’s office and I’m also their leader,” she said. “Change is difficult. What I try to do is show up, know the great work they do and be as encouraging and purposeful as I can.”

Nowadays, Rollins doesn’t spend much time on the playing field, but still enjoys watching her daughter run track, where she has won national championships in the 100m and 200m races. Such things are encouraging, she said, to see girls and young women have so many opportunities that were hard-fought by the generation ahead of them – a generation such as the women athletes like Rollins who used the legal system to challenge decision makers.

“It’s really exciting to see young women are getting the same opportunities men have had a long time,” she said. “Being excited for my young girls playing sports doesn’t take away from my excitement for young men playing sports. We want everyone to have the opportunity for success, on and off the field.”

DA Rollins indicates her office will be more present at crime scenes

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins said one change she has made immediately to the office is making sure at major crime scenes, she and members of her office are on scene.

That includes homicides and other such crimes.

Whether in Boston, Chelsea, Revere or Winthrop, she said it is important to be present at the scene, even if it’s the middle of the night.

She said she has instructed everyone to call her no matter what time, and not to wait for the morning to brief her on major crimes.

“For me, it’s important to kind of be proximate and present when things happen so people know we not only handle the case, but also we had boots on the ground from the beginning. A lot of the work we do is behind the scenes and people don’t see it…So, it’s important they see us and we experience what they are dealing with because it really makes us have insight into the work we do every single day.”

She said that, particularly at homicides, she and her office would make every effort to be on scene throughout the county.

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Bunker Hill CC Changes Mascot

After more than a year of research, reflection and evaluation, Bunker Hill Community College (BHCC) has revealed a newly designed bulldog mascot to represent the College’s Athletics program. The new BHCC Athletics Bulldog was revealed at the College Faculty/Staff Forum on March 12.

The refreshed mascot design features a running bulldog, energetic and with its eyes focused forward, seeking success in a manner congruent with the program’s mission and consistent with the uniqueness of BHCC.

The bulldog has long been the mascot of BHCC Athletics. New Director of Athletics Dr. Loreto Jackson, who joined the College in 2017, felt that the mascot needed a refresh to better align with the College’s purpose and values. “The former bulldog had many different renditions,” explained Dr. Jackson. “The designs were not unique to BHCC, and, more importantly, did not embody the philosophy of BHCC.”

The College enlisted national brand identity firm Phoenix Design Works to assist with the mascot development. After research and discussion with department stakeholders, Jackson wanted to remove the common ideas of bulldogs—that they are mean-spirited, arrogant, combative or lazy. Instead, the BHCC Bulldog should portray respect, tenacity, a competitive spirit and loyalty. Also important was a gender-neutral mascot, unrestrained by the classic bulldog spiked collar. Bunker Hill Community College is a member of the National Junior Collegiate Athletic Association (NJCAA), Division III. For more information on BHCC Athletics, please visit bhcc.edu/athletics.

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