City Manager Gets New, Five-Year Contract

City Manager Gets New, Five-Year Contract

City Manager Thomas Ambrosino got a new five-year contract and a healthy serving of praise from the City Council Monday night.

The council approved the contract with a 10-0 vote. Councilor-at-Large Roy Avellaneda was not present at Monday night’s meeting.

Ambrosino gets a three percent raise with the new deal, from $184,913 annually to $189,945.

Council President Damali Vidot said a sub-committee made up of Councilors Luis Tejada, Giovanni Recupero and Yamir Rodriguez had been evaluating Ambrosino for several months, and agreed that he has done a good job and should be invited back.

“He’s done a great job and he wanted to go five years instead of four years so he would be closer to retirement age at the end of this contract,” she said. “I think he deserved it. I felt he earned five years. He got a really good evaluation and people are very pleased with his performance.”

Vidot said the evaluation showed councilors and the public felt he was a little too hands-off on his management of departments, and wanted to see him be a little more hands-on with them. For Vidot, she said one of his strengths has been treating the City Council with great respect.

“He has really given the City Council the respect it deserves,” she said. “I didn’t see that in the previous administration. Chelsea seems to really be coming together. There seems to be so much more interest in social and civic issues and more unity overall.”

On Monday night, the praises continued at the Council meeting before they voted to extend the contract five more years.

“The city manager has done a great job,” said District 8 Councilor Calvin T. Brown. “He’s committed, a creative thinker, and a very approachable city manager.”

Several councilors commented on Ambrosino’s responsiveness to residents’ concerns.

“Whenever I have had a problem in my district and brought it to his attention, the city manager has been very responsive,” said District 1 Councilor Robert Bishop.

District 5 Councilor Judith Garcia said Ambrosino has been an incredible asset and resource for the community.

“He has invested a lot in the community, and I hear it from my constituents a lot,” said Garcia.

In addition to the three percent pay raise, Ambrosino will get an additional $500 per year for travel, and the former Revere mayor’s new contract will be for five years, compared to his current four-year contract.

“I’m very pleased and very grateful to the city council for giving me a vote of confidence,” Ambrosino said following Monday night’s meeting. “I will do everything I can to continue to make them proud of my work.”

Ambrosino has said since last fall he would like to be asked to return to Chelsea for another contract term. He said he feels like he has more work to do in the city, particularly with his downtown initiatives.

•In other Council news:

A resolution passed by the City Council Monday night recognized February as Black History Month and thanked the Lewis H. Latimer Society, Bunker Hill Community College, and the Chelsea Black Community “Remembering Black Migration, WWI, and the Chelsea Fire” for the contributions to the city.

The Council also recognized Feb. 21 as Dr. Maya Angelou Day in Chelsea.

•The council requested a meeting with Emergency Management Director Keith Vetreno to discuss 911 services.

•Councilor-at-Large Leo Robinson requested that City Manager Tom Ambrosino update the council on all planned development in the city. •District 6 Councilor Giovanni Recupero requested a brighter streetlight on Charles Street, as well as a study for traffic on the Meridian Street Bridge. The brightness of the new LED streetlights has been a problem point for several years, as most of them are on the lowest setting to save money on power. Recupero has routinely asked the City to increase the brightness on the new LED lights.

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Police Briefs 01-31-2019

Police Briefs 01-31-2019

MIDDLE SCHOOLER ARRESTED FOR KNIFE ATTACK

On January 14, officers responded to a matter being investigated by the School Resource Officers alleging an assault by means of a dangerous weapon, a knife. Officers spoke to a juvenile male who reported being assaulted by another juvenile male while heading home from the Browne Middle School. As the result of this investigation, an identification was made of a 14-year-old juvenile male suspect that was taken into custody a short time later. No injuries reported, and no weapon was recovered. Officers are continuing to work with the schools for ongoing safety concerns.

A 14-year-old juvenile was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (knife) and assault and battery.

SCREAMING AT BUSES

On Jan. 15, around 11:33 p.m., officers were called to assist an MBTA bus driver for unruly female shouting at passing cars. Officers arrived and encountered said female shouting obscenities at officers. Despite efforts to calm her down, she continued her tirade and was placed into custody for disorderly person without further incident.

Krysten Kulch, 32, of 58 Garfield Ave., was charged with disorderly conduct.

HEROIN DEALER FROM GARFIELD AVE BUSTED

On Thursday, Jan. 17, detectives were conducting an ongoing drug investigation in the Prattville area after complaints were received. Detectives arranged to contact a potential source of narcotics and subsequently arranged a purchase to be made. After the suspect agreed to meet the officers to sell narcotics at a prearranged spot, the officers observed him to arrive. He met the undercover officer to exchange an amount of US currency for what appeared to be Heroin. The suspect was taken into custody without further incident.

Jose Gonzalez, 48, 105 Garfield Ave., was charged with distribution of a Class A drug (heroin) and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.

DRUG DEAL WITNESSED

Officers received a call from dispatch regarding a drug transaction that was witnessed by a civilian in Bellingham Square. Based on the phone call and independent observations corroborating this tip, Officers encountered two individuals at the McDonalds in Bellingham Square. Officers then conducted an independent investigation and developed probable cause to arrest one subject for the Distribution of a Class C Substance as well as an outstanding warrant from the Roxbury District Court. The second subject was identified and criminal charges are being sought for the Possession of Class C. William Falasca, 34, of Medford, was charged with distribution of a Class C drug and one warrant.

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Thank You, Jay Ash

Thank You, Jay Ash

When Governor Charlie Baker was elected to his first term of office four years ago, his first major announcement was the appointment of Jay Ash to the post of Secretary of Housing and Economic Development.

The announcement by Gov. Baker, a Republican, came as a surprise to many political insiders because Ash was a lifelong Democrat and at the time was serving as the City Manager for the City of Chelsea, a post he had held for almost 15 years. Moreover, the Secretary of Housing and Economic Development is among the most important members of a governor’s cabinet, and typically goes to a person who is among those most trusted by the governor to implement his broad policy objectives.

However, Ash’s appointment by Gov.-elect Baker signaled two things about the incoming administration: First, that Baker was going to “reach across the aisle” to Democrats and second, that he was seeking the most-qualified persons he could find to serve in his administration.

During the past four years, Charlie Baker’s appointment of Jay Ash, who officially stepped down from his cabinet post in December to become the new president of a nonprofit business group known as the Massachusetts Competitive Partnership, has proven to be a win-win for Gov. Baker — and the people of Massachusetts — on both scores.

Ash, who had served for many years as the chief of staff to former House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Voke, not only knew the ins-and-outs of the legislative process, but also was on a first-name basis with many legislators, most notably House Speaker Bob DeLeo, who played a key role in working with Jay in implementing the many initiatives put forth by the Baker administration.

In addition, Jay Ash brought to the table his experience as the City Manager of Chelsea, a small city that is the prototype for both the potential and pitfalls of economic development of urban areas throughout the state.

During his tenure, Jay Ash brought to fruition many projects that will bring economic benefits for future generations of our state’s residents. Among Ash’s signature accomplishments, he played a key role in bringing the Pawtucket Red Sox to Worcester, which included the redevelopment of the city’s Canal District with $35 million in infrastructure and affordable housing funds; he brought $12.5 million in state funds to the Berkshire Innovation Center, which will focus on life sciences in Pittsfield; he played an integral role in persuading General Electric to locate its world headquarters in Boston’s Seaport District; and he was instrumental in bringing about a significant reduction in the number of homeless families living in motels.

All in all, Jay Ash’s tenure as Secretary of Housing and Economic Development has been among the most successful and remarkable of any Cabinet member of any administration in the state’s history.

We know we speak not only for the residents of his native Chelsea, but also for citizens throughout the state, in thanking Jay Ash for his years of public service and wishing him well in his future endeavors.

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Freezin’ for a Reason: Chelsea Rotarian Joe Panetta Will Jump into the Atlantic for Polio Eradication

Freezin’ for a Reason: Chelsea Rotarian Joe Panetta Will Jump into the Atlantic for Polio Eradication

Rotary District 7930 will hold its 9th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, February 9th, at Long Beach in Gloucester. The event is part of Rotary International’s ongoing campaign to eradicate polio in our lifetime. More than 300 people are expected to plunge into the cold waters off Cape Ann this year including the Rotary Club of Chelsea. Last year, over 250 people braved the icy waters, raising more than $100,000 and welcoming Rotarians, friends, and family members from 45 Rotary Clubs.

Since 1985, Polio has become the signature cause for Rotary International as it has teamed up with partners including The Global Poverty Project, The Global Eradication Initiative, The World Health Organization, and The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Since that time, more than a billion dollars have been raised among Rotary clubs worldwide and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. When Rotary International took on the battle against this disease, more than 350,000 people spanning 125 countries were impacted. Today there are three countries left where it has not been eradicated – Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. However, due to combined targeted efforts and donations,

Nigeria reported no new cases of polio in 2018 and the number of total cases last year fell to just 29 worldwide!

Again, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged a 2:1 match for every dollar Rotarians raise toward eradication efforts. For as little as $0.60, a donation can make the difference in changing a person’s life. Please support your local Rotarians as they brave the icy waters off Gloucester to help eradicate polio in our lifetime. The Chelsea Club has set a goal at $1000 to aid in the district’s goal of raising $250,000. The district is utilizing an electronic fundraising process. Supporters are encouraged to log on to Chelsea Rotary’s team page and make a donation to help Rotarians lead the way to eradicate this dreaded disease. https://app.mobilecause.com/vf/polio/team/Chelsea

For more information on how the Rotary Club of Chelsea serves the local and global community, visit chelsearotary.org or contact the club at mfoley@xsshotels.com

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Police Briefs 01-17-2019

Police Briefs 01-17-2019

ARMED ROBBERY OF CAR

On Dec. 31, at 10 p.m., officers were dispatched to 144 Bloomingdale St. for a report of a past armed robbery. Upon arrival, Officers spoke to the victim who stated while driving his car he was cut off by a vehicle on Bloomingdale St. He told officers that the two males exited the sedan and approached him saying that he had just struck their car.

The passengers of the suspect’s car then proceeded to rob him of his wallet and its contents. A short time later, the officers received information on the whereabouts of the suspect vehicle and stopped it. The victim was able to identify the two males in the car as the persons that robbed him. Both were taken into custody.

Rigoberto Ruiz-Cadiz, 22, of 146 Bloomingdale St.; and Efrain Alicea, 22, of 64 Addison St., were both charged with armed robbery.

NEW YEAR’S (WINDOW) BASH

On Jan. 1, at 11:30 a.m., CPD officers responded to 140 Shawmut St. for a report of an intoxicated male party that had destroyed a window to a residence. Upon arrival, a witness pointed out the male individual who caused the damage. He was placed under arrest for malicious destruction of property.

Ernesto Bonilla, 18, of East Boston, was charged with malicious destruction of property under $1,200.

TRIED TO USE A STOLEN CREDIT CARD

On Jan. 3, at 6:50 p.m., CPD officers responded to the Homewood Suites Inn for a report of a male party attempting to use a stolen credit card. At the hotel, the officers spoke with a hotel employee, who stated that the suspect just fled the hotel after he tried to pay for a room with a stolen credit card. A short time later, the same male was attempting to secure a room at the Residence Inn with another stolen credit card. He was placed under arrest.

Andy Joseph, 34, of 1 Webster Ave., was charged with unlicensed operation, possession of an open container in a motor vehicle, larceny of a credit card, and two counts of uttering/forging a credit card.

PUBLIC DRINKING

On Jan. 5, at 10:55 a.m., a CPD officer on foot was patrolling Luther Place. The officer observed a male party in the area behind 466 Broadway drinking out of a bottle of liquor. The male was placed under arrest drinking in public.

Jose Martinez, 56, of East Boston, was charged with violating the public drinking ordinance.

DA ROLLINS CHOOSES CHIEF OF STAFF

Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins announced last week that Jennifer Grace Miller will be her Chief of Staff, citing Miller’s broad experience in senior government positions, including stints at two statewide law enforcement agencies.

Miller’s first day will be Feb. 1, 2019.

Miller has most recently served as Counsel to the Massachusetts Senate, where she was the chief legal counsel to 40 senators and approximately 200 staff members. Prior to joining the Senate, Miller was Chief of the Government Bureau in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s office. As Chief, Miller supervised roughly 100 lawyers and staff in three divisions. She previously served as the Bureau’s Deputy Chief and as an assistant attorney general in the Administrative Law Division, focusing primarily on civil appellate work. Among other high-profile litigation, Miller argued the Massachusetts buffer zone case,McCullen v. Coakley, at the United States Supreme Court.

Miller began her public service career as Senior Staff Counsel at the Supreme Judicial Court. She then served as Assistant Solicitor General in the New York Attorney General’s office.

“Jennifer Grace Miller is a smart, dedicated public servant with deep experience managing complex government institutions and sophisticated litigation,” District Attorney Rollins said. “She has worked in all three branches of government and will bring a trusted set of skills and perspective to the District Attorney’s office.”

She also serves as a Commissioner on the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission.

Police Log

Monday, 12/31

Dilcia Menjivar, 31, 39 Lawton Ave., Lynn, was arrested for intimidation.

Rigoberto Ruiz-Cadiz, 22, 146 Bloomingdale St., Chelsea, was arrested for armed robbery.

Efrain Alicea, 22, 64 Addison St., Chelsea, was arrested for armed robbery.

Tuesday, 1/1

Ernesto Bonilla, 18, 155 Lexington St., East Boston, was arrested for malicious destruction of property.

Julio Portillo, 52, Pine Street Inn, Boston, was arrested for resisting arrest and on a warrant.

Wednesday, 1/2

Yancarlos Mejia-Gonzalez, 31, 72 Upham St., Malden, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended license, failing to stop for police, red light violation and immigration detainer.

Darnell Booth, 37, 560 Beach St., Revere, was arrested for probation warrant.

Carlos Ramos, 51, 27 Watts St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed.

Thursday, 1 /3

John Lewis, 34, 292 Salem St., Revere, was arrested on a warrant.

Andy Joseph, 34, 1 Webster Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed, possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle, larceny of credit card, utter forged credit card (2 counts).

Saturday, 1/5

Jose Martinez, 56, 264 Bennington St., East Boston, was arrested for ordinance violation of alcoholic beverage, marijuana/THC.

Faisal Yerow, 23, 120 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for probation warrant.

Sunday, 1/6 Quincy Parker, 42, 90 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

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Equitable Access:Chelsea School Leaders Demand Educational Equity for All Students at Malden Forum

Equitable Access:Chelsea School Leaders Demand Educational Equity for All Students at Malden Forum

Chelsea School Superintendent
Mary Bourque and Chelsea City Manager Thomas Ambrosino were two panelists
Tuesday night at Malden High School discussing school budget funding.

Chelsea School Superintendent Mary Bourque and Chelsea City Manager Thomas Ambrosino were two panelists Tuesday night at Malden High School during a forum calling on legislators to overhaul the state’s current educational funding model to ensure equity for all students, especially those in low-income areas.

During the state’s last legislative session a bill by State Sen. Sonia Chang-Diaz (D-Jamaica Plain) would have recalculated the cost to educate each student in public school districts known as the ‘foundation budget’ and poured millions of dollars into school over the next several years.

However that bill failed and educators like Bourque are calling this mechanism the state uses to provide students with equitable access to educational opportunities ‘obsolete’ and must be revised to meet the expectations of today’s economy.

Because the state has not updated its education funding formula since 1993 to reflect districts’ real health insurance and special education costs, the amount of aid being provided to cover those costs is too small.

To compensate, many districts like Chelsea end up using money that would otherwise have supported core education programs—including Regular Ed. Teachers, Materials & Technology, and Professional Development. This also results in dramatic cuts in other areas of education.

“The time is now because we have no more time left,” said Bourque at Tuesday night’s meeting. “There will be more cuts because we don’t know where the money will come from. We cut all of our after school programs…elementary (afterschool) programs two years ago and middle school after school programs last year. It’s time to make changes to the formula and we need to make the formula work for us. It is time to save the futures of our students and open those doors to the future. We can not afford to have our students go through another year of cuts in their school system.”

The problem for low income school districts like Chelsea is there is a growing equity gap between schools in Chelsea and schools in more affluent areas of the state. When faced with such shortfalls, high-wealth districts can often draw on additional, local revenue. Lower-wealth districts like Chelsea, however, are generally unable to do so and the consequence is that they spend less on resources that are critically important to the quality of education students receive.

“I do think there a lot of school systems in a financial crisis my expectation is that if this is not addressed in this legislative session we are going to have a lot of tough decisions to make like Brockton did where they had to lay off a significant amount of teachers,” said Ambrosino. “We are living in good economic times. State revenues have been running above estimates for quite some time so it’s time for the legislature to use this good fortune and make education a priority once again and invest in education. This is not easy and requires a lot of money so I don’t envy any legislators that have to work on this but budgets are all about priorities. A budget, simply put, is a policy statement on your (the legislation’s) priorities and the legislature once again has to make education a priority. If it doesn’t there will be too many ‘have nots’ in the Commonwealth once again.”

Estimates by lawmakers to fix the budget formula could be as high as $1 billion with Gov. Charlie Baker vowing to put forth his own proposal to fix the broken system after the House and Senate couldn’t agree on a solution last year.

However, Bourque said something has to be done and done soon because Chelsea is running a $7.4 million school budget gap between what the state covers for education and what the Chelsea School District is actually spending to educate students.

“Morally obligated to meet our students needs and provide for them so they can be successful and have futures,” said Bourque. “Sometimes, as a superintendent, I feel like we’ve been living on a ‘fixed budget’ since 1993 and that fixed income is not working. The result is that we are stretched too thin.”

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Chelsea Council Gets Back to Business for 2019 Session

Chelsea Council Gets Back to Business for 2019 Session

The City Council got back to business Monday night with a special organizational meeting and then quickly taking care of the new year’s first agenda items.

As expected, the Council approved a second term for Damali Vidot as council president. District 2 Councillor Luis Tejada was voted in as vice president, and Yamir Rodriguez as the Council’s delegate to the School Committee.

“I want to thank all my colleague’s for entrusting me with one more year as president,” said Vidot. She is the first female councillor to serve two back-to-back terms as council president.

Vidot said she is looking forward to a year of unity and respect on the council.

In other business, the Council unanimously approved funding for new contracts for the City’s two police unions.

The contracts include a retroactive salary increase of 2.5 percent for FY17 and 3 percent for FY18 and FY19. There is also a 3 percent increase slated for FY20 and an additional 1 percent increase that goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

The contract also implements residency requirements for all new hires for the Police Department.

Later in the meeting, the Council also approved an amended residency ordinance for all police, fire, and civil service employees.

The ordinance requires that all personnel who live in Chelsea at the time of the hire must maintain residency for five years from the date of hire. Personnel who do not live in the city at the time of hire have six months to relocate to Chelsea.

Councillor-At-Large Leo Robinson cast the lone vote against the amended ordinance, using the example of a child who might have to look after sick parents as a possible reason an employee may not be able to relocate.

•During the public speaking portion of the meeting, some familiar guests dropped in to say thank you to the Council.

Several members of the Chelsea High senior class thanked the council for its recent vote to fund a turf field cover to the tune of $170,000 for the new high school field.

With the field cover, the senior class and subsequent classes will be able to hold outdoor graduations.

“We’ve put so much hard work into this, and everything that has happened has been amazing,” said Senior Class President Jocelyn Poste.

Poste and several other seniors presented the Council with a signed letter in appreciation for their efforts. They also asked the council for their signatures on a proclamation documenting the students’ and the Council’s efforts to work together to make the turf field cover a reality.

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City Looks to Residents to Name, Define Neighborhoods

City Looks to Residents to Name, Define Neighborhoods

Ask 100 people where the Mill Hill neighborhood separates from the Mill Creek neighborhood and one would probably get 100 different answers.

Neighborhoods in Chelsea have been loosely defined for decades, with some not even named at all, but now Downtown Coordinator Mimi Graney is looking to residents of Chelsea to define the City’s neighborhoods more precisely.

“It came up because City Planner Karl Allen has been working on a project by the Produce Center and he kept calling it West Chelsea,” she said. “Every time he did that, people would laugh at it. It brought up the question as to what do you call that area. It was the same thing for the Walnut Street Synagogue area. Then you have people talking about Prattville. We decided to try to figure out what you call the various neighborhoods of Chelsea.”

That started with a query of the Chel-Yea group last month, and during that event and with online follow ups, Graney said she got very impassioned responses.

People, she said, took it very seriously.

“Several people said everything was just Chelsea, but others had strong opinions about Admiral’s Hill and Prattville,” she said. “It has solicited a lot of interested conversations.”

Graney has produced a map with suggested boundaries and names. So far, they have included Prattville, Mayor’s Row, Chelsea High, Addison-Orange, Soldiers’ Home/Powderhorn Hill, Cary Square, Mill Creek, Mill Hill, Spencer Avenue, Eastern Ave Industrial Area, Box District, Bellingham Hill, Salt Piles, Waterfront, Downtown (including Chelsea Square and Bellingham Square), Williams School, Carter Park, Mystic Mall, Produce District and Admiral’s Hill.

It was difficult, she said, to find the real boundaries of the Soldiers’ Home neighborhood versus Cary Square, she said, and many said the Spencer Avenue area should be called Upper Broadway. Mill Creek, on the other hand, has been confused in some ways with the Parkway Plaza.

She said the exercise is one that moves beyond the fun of talking about it, and moving towards making it a place.

“The legacy of the fire in the Mystic Mall area sort of upended most boundaries there,” she said. “People are uncomfortable with the area beyond Carter Park and Chelsea High area. If it doesn’t have a name, it becomes this no man’s land. Naming a place has a power to it. I’m hoping people in these areas claim that power in that naming.”

Graney said they will continue to take input on the neighborhood boundaries, and will likely present something to the community in the near future.

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Chelsea Man Arrested after Leaving Two in Serious Condition

Chelsea Man Arrested after Leaving Two in Serious Condition

Police have arrested a 24-year-old Chelsea man in connection to a shooting and stabbing at 16 Pleasant St. early Saturday morning.

Hector Emilio Hernandez, was arrested on charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm following the alleged attack, according to Jake Wark, spokesman for the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office.

Revere police and emergency medical personnel responded to 16 Pleasant St. at about 1:45 a.m. Saturday to find a 27-year-old man from Chelsea apparently shot and a 23-year old man from Chelsea apparently stabbed. Both were hospitalized. State Police detectives were notified and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit responded.

Hernandez is expected to be arraigned Monday in Chelsea District Court.

“The relationship between the parties involved remains under investigation, as do the circumstances surrounding the violent encounter,” Wark said in a statement.

Wark added that based on an investigation that continued through Saturday morning and into Saturday afternoon, troopers and officers developed information that the suspect may be in the area of Calumet Street in Revere.
Troopers and officers set up surveillance and observed a man matching the suspect’s description enter a residence on that street.

When police went to the house they observed the suspect exit a back door and try to climb a fence. He was caught and apprehended and transported to the State Police Barracks in Revere where he was booked on charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact the Revere Police Criminal Investigation Division at 781-286-8340 or the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit at 617-727-8817.

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So Far….So Good

So Far….So Good

With the rush and hub-bub of the holiday season now over, we’ll all be settling in for another long New England winter.

Up to this point, we have been fortunate. We have yet to feel the wrath of any truly wintry weather. A cold day here or there — including a chilly Thanksgiving — has not been hard to take. Indeed, the temperatures have been quite moderate since the Winter Solstice on Dec. 21, with the New Year’s Day temperature rising into the mid-50s, making it quite a nice day for a walk or a run outside, despite the strong breeze.

However, we know that Mother Nature typically saves her best (or worst) for later in the season. In just the past few years, we had winter storm Nemo in February of 2013, the Snowmageddon winter of 2015 (in which there was no snow in December), and last year we had those crazy storms in early January and early March that knocked out power throughout the region and brought coastal flooding to places along our bayside areas that never had experienced it to that extent before.

The images of Boston Harbor flooding into the Seaport District and water pouring into the Aquarium T stop were something we never had seen in our entire lives as residents of this area — and that includes the Blizzard of ‘78 and the No Name Storm of 1991. The highest-ever high tide (exceeding the Blizzard of ‘78) and the third-highest tide in Boston Harbor were recorded in those two storms last year.

As we are writing this, the 10-day forecast is pretty nice, especially considering that it is the first part of January. However, the models for the long-range forecast indicate that February will be colder, snowier, and stormier than usual in our part of the country.

But as any longtime New Englander knows, all that we can do is to take winter one day at a time and be grateful for the nice days when we get them. When it comes to the weather, especially in this era of climate change, we are at the mercy of the vicissitudes of Mother Nature.

We can hope for the best, but we must expect the worst.

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