In Appreciation: Remembering Elaine Richard

In Appreciation: Remembering Elaine Richard

The greatest legacy of Elaine Marie Richard was seated in the front rows at the Our Lady of Grace Church.

The four loving and devoted sons, Ken, Jim, Jack, and Edward – these four scholar-athletes, all graduates of Chelsea High School and the best universities in the nation – led a beautiful tribute to their beautiful mother.

When it came time to encapsulate all that Mrs. Richard had meant to her family and the great example she had set for her children and the family, it was Jack Richard, who stepped to the lectern to deliver the eulogy.

A brilliant, personable man who excelled at Tufts University and Boston College Law School, Jack rose to the occasion with words that showcased the richness of his talents.

“Before I speak for my brothers, I should first speak for my mother,” he began. “Many of you here today have been so good to her through the years, and I know she would want me to begin by thanking you all and by telling you how much she and we appreciate all your kindnesses to her big and small.”

Jack told the assemblage that the day truly was “a celebration of life, a full life very well-lived and filled with great joys, but also marked by great sorrows.”

Jack said their mother grew up in a big triple decker in Chelsea “in a house full of family and faith” where she was doted on by her older sister, Marjorie, and brother, Edward.

Elaine Doherty Richard was an excellent student herself and graduated at the top of her class at the St. Rose School.

“When Elaine Doherty, that cute little girl, grew to become a beautiful young woman, she met the one and only love of her life,” said Jack. “Ken Richard was talented, handsome, strong, and as we kids would say, ‘wicked smart.’”

Elaine Doherty and Kenneth Richard married when she was 22. “The four of us were always so proud of both of our parents,” said Jack.

The four boys were born five years apart. Mrs. Richard would prepare meals for her four sons and her husband each day. She would send her sons off each morning to Our Lady of Grace School. The boys did their homework at night at the dining room table with the assistance of their mother.

“But day after day, every day, Elaine Richard did it all with grace and with cheer,” said Jack. “All in all, our mom, against all the odds at that time and place, she succeeded. She was proud to say she went 4-for-4 with her sons.”

But just as Elaine and Kenneth Richard “were about to enjoy all the benefits of their work – with all four kids in college, they were finally about to get some well-deserved time together for themselves, my young and healthy dad passed away suddenly,” related Jack. “My mother’s sweet and happy world was crushed. She was only 44 years old.”

Following the death of her husband, Elaine Richard “never quit on life and she soldiered on, and day by day, year by year, she built a new life and she taught us a lesson in grace and in perseverance, a truly good example.”

“If you know my brothers and me,” then you know Elaine Richard,” said Jack. He praised his brothers, “Ken, who was thrust in to the role of the man of the house when he was just a college kid, protective of us all and the most solid dependable man there is; Jim, a deeply spiritual man whose faith and his family are the very center of his life; and Ed, the best guy with the biggest heart who would do anything for you, but also with the strongest will of anyone I’ve ever known. We are what we are because of her.”

Jack Richard said this Christmas their mother gave the family “the most important gift and lesson.”

“She taught us how to die,” said Jack. “For two weeks, we had all been taking turns at her bedside, just as she had done with us so many times when we were sick as children. We got to say how much we loved each other. We held her hand and we told her how good she was. She spoke of how this family she had built would live on, in us, in her 12 grandchildren, in her five great-grandchildren.”

Elaine Doherty Richard died on Christmas day. She was 86 years old. She will be missed.

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Police Briefs 01-03-2019

Police Briefs 01-03-2019

Monday, 12/10

Alberto Garcia, 51, 303 Carter St., Chelsea, was arrested on warrants.

Krysten, Kulch, 32, 58 Garfield Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Tuesday, 12/11

Wilson Ruiz-Rivera, 33, 137 Eutaw St., East Boston, was arrested for red light violation and operating motor vehicle with suspended license.

Katherine Guzman, 36, 18 Watts St., Chelsea, was arrested for receiving stolen motor vehicle.

Thursday, 12/13

Laura Basum, 32, 600 Main St., Everett, was arrested on warrants.

Friday, 12/14

Edward Diaz, 34, 11 Starbird St., Malden, was arrested on a warrant.

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9-1-1 Gets Thanksgiving Treat

9-1-1 Gets Thanksgiving Treat

Chelsea 9-1-1 Dispatchers were treated to a full course homemade Thanksgiving Dinner with all the fixings compliments of Emergency Management Director Keith Vetreno and his wife Tina during their Thanksgiving shift. Their act of kindness was greatly appreciated by all. Pictured above are 911 Dispatchers Richard Smith, Paul Koolloian, Emergency Management Director Keith Vetreno and Dispatcher Edward Collina.

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Hundreds Join Roca for Its 30th Anniversary Celebration Party

An outpouring of community love, relentlessness and transformation echoed around Park Street Wednesday as the region’s leaders joined hundreds of young people, the adults that love them and community partners in celebrating Roca’s deep impact the last three decades.

Roca’s participants, staff, alumni and partners came together for a night of live music and food to celebrate Roca’s 30th anniversary. Roca leaders thanked the community, its partners and allies in making such a difference in young people’s lives.

“I am in awe of all of you and all the young people we have met, had the honor of working with the last 30 years and all of the Roca team, our partners and this community who made all this relentlessness possible,” said Roca Founder and CEO Molly Baldwin.

At the event, Roca honored its Roca30 Unsung Hero Awardees, including state Sen. Sal DiDomenico, Probation Commissioner Edward Dolan, Youth Services Commissioner Peter Forbes, Boston Police Captain Haseeb Hosein, Chelsea Police Captain David Batchelor, Hampden County First Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Fitzgerald and Kim Hanton, director of diversionary addiction services at North Suffolk Mental Health Association.

“These seven individuals work on issues and for people who are well out of the headlines and far from the limelight because it’s the right thing and because it makes a difference,” said Baldwin. “They are truly unsung heroes.”

Featured speakers at the event were Jay Ash, secretary of housing and economic development under Gov. Charlie Baker, Harry Spence, the former Receiver of Chelsea and Massachusetts Court Administration and Eric Rodriguez, a founding Roca youth member and lead pastor of The Way Church.

The most special part of the evening came when Roca also honored seven youth participants as unsung heroes as well – seven young people whose lives have been upended by Roca’s relentless outreach, its transformative programs and its many partnerships.

Those young people are:

  • Joseph Acosta
  • Caralis Rosario Hernandez
  • Dakwam Johnson
  • Ana Mejia
  • Amauris Melendez
  • Gage Morrow
  • Dennis Rodriguez

Each of the speakers paused to honor Roca and its team, in particular the driving force of the last 30 years – Molly Baldwin. Ash, the former Chelsea City Manager, presented Baldwin with a award honoring her service and summed up the accollades of many by noting her personal relentlessness as an indisputable driver of Roca’s success.

“If not for Molly Baldwin, there are so many people who wouldn’t be where they are or even alive today,” said Ash. “Molly’s life of service and her relentlessness is an inspiration to us all.”

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Celebrating Pride in Our Communities

Celebrating Pride in Our Communities

Every June, our communities come together to celebrate Pride Month, a tradition that grows stronger every year. In 1989, Massachusetts became the second state to pass a law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. In 2004, Massachusetts became the first state to allow same-sex couples to marry. Our state has always been a national leader on defending LGBTQ rights, and I’m proud of our communities’ work and reputation as a place that promotes inclusion and acceptance.

As we celebrate Pride in our communities, we look at how far we have come as a country, and how far we have to go. In Washington, Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress are trying to roll back the gains the LGBTQ community has fought so hard to make. As your representative in Congress, you have my promise: I’ll never stop fighting for equal rights for everyone.

Last June, I sat down with bipartisan leaders at the Edward M. Kennedy Institute to focus on advocacy and activism within the LGBTQ community in the wake of the 2016 presidential election. The theme of the panel was “stronger together” — despite the people that try to drive a wedge between communities, we are the strongest when we stand united in the face of discrimination. That’s a value I truly believe in.

The LGBTQ community is no stranger to fighting for their rights, and I’m proud that I’ve supported my constituents on the issues that matter. This includes co-sponsoring legislation to repeal the Defense of Marriage Act; fighting against defining marriage as a union between a man and a woman; working to repeal Don’t Ask Don’t Tell; supporting the Employment Non-Discrimination Act; and supporting the right of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents to sponsor same-sex spouses for green cards before court decisions upheld that right.

I’m proud of my 100% rating from the Human Rights Campaign, but even prouder of the fact that when I served as Somerville’s mayor, I fought hard for equal benefits, including fighting against insurance companies who refused to extend benefits to same-sex couples. As mayor, I was successful in redefining who was eligible for extended maximum bereavement leave to include domestic partners — and all these fights came before our laws allowed or required these actions.

Today, we’ve come far. On Saturday, I’m honored to march in the 48th Pride Parade in Boston. 48 years of celebrating who people are, who they love, and the battles we’ve had to fight to make our city, our state and our nation a place where inclusion and acceptance are the norm, not the exception. I know we have work to do here in Massachusetts, and around our country. And during Pride Week in Massachusetts, I’m proud to join the LGBTQ community and celebrate what makes each and every person unique.

Happy Pride Parade, Pride Week and Pride Month — and here’s to another year of creating more opportunities for all.

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Court Graduation:One of the Few Good Days at Chelsea Court

Court Graduation:One of the Few Good Days at Chelsea Court

By Seth Daniel

Those who work in the Chelsea Courthouse and those who frequent it with criminal cases know that there aren’t a lot of great days marked in the building.

It’s not exactly a place to come celebrate.

But occasionally, the smiles come out and the celebratory cake gets cut, and that one day of happiness in the Court is Drug Court graduation day.

On Tuesday, June 27, just such a celebration took place in the Chelsea Courthouse and four graduates from the grueling life-turnaround program celebrated sobriety, clean living and getting their path straight.

“Honestly, nothing good really ever happens in a courthouse,” said Judge Matthew Nestor. “One of the only good days in a courthouse like this is drug court graduation day. It’s really a great day for the participants. We’re proud to have watched them come such a long way and to see that they have accomplished a lot. It’s a day by day thing for them, but we’re proud.”

Drug Court is a special program pioneered and refined at Chelsea District Court many years ago, and a program that has been replicated in numerous other jurisdictions where drug use and addiction is a problem. Some defendants are given the opportunity to enter the program in lieu of their punishment, and strict and rigorous requirements for sobriety are enacted upon them.

Tara Fleming, a graduate, said she had been through it all – on the streets, doing drugs and making a life out of coming in and out of the court. That was until she began Drug Court in 2014. Now, she is on the right path and said the graduation day marked a huge milestone in her life.

“It has been an absolute turnaround,” she said. “I was homeless on the street. I hurt myself on the streets. I ended up in drug court after being arrested three times in two weeks. It saved my life. I’ve been fighting through it every since. I refuse to go back.”

Another graduate, Heather Harper, described the day as “colossal.”

“It’s colossal because since the age of 14 I’ve doing this – drugs and court,” she said. “Drugs, prostitution, everything. I’ve done it all. This is great right now to have accomplished this. Nov. 8, 2015 is the date that stands out to me. That’s the day I decided to start this. Eighteen months of Chelsea Drug Court and this is it. I have one thing that I like to remember, ‘Never look back unless it’s to see how far you’ve come.’”

Other graduates included Christopher Bonsai and Edward Sarmanian.

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Obituaries 06-02-2016

Claire Ells

Dedicated her life to husband, family and home

Claire L. Ells of Chelsea passed away on May 24 after a brief illness while convalescing for the past two months at the Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home. She was 86 years old.

Born and raised in Revere, she was one of six children of the late John and Mary (McAvinue) Costello. She was a graduate of Revere High School. After high school,l she worked for a brief time in Boston with Kennedy’s Men Store, and later with Forbes lithograph and Travco Industries in Chelsea.

She married her beloved Harry M. Ells in April of 1952 and has been a Chelsea resident since that day and for the past 64 years. Her life was dedicated to love of her husband, family and home. She enjoyed bingo, was a voracious reader and kept sharp with crossword puzzles and other word games.

In addition to her parents, she was also preceded in death by a sister, Dorothy Doherty and two brothers; John and Edward Costello. She is survived by her beloved husband of 64 years, Harry M. Ells, Jr. of Chelsea. She was the loving and devoted mother of Harry M. Ells and his wife, Patricia of Everett, Susan Silvia and her husband, Michael of Reading, Barbara Camoscio and her husband, Anthony of Tewksbury and Edward Ells and his companion, Eileen Gurska of Chelsea. She was the dear sister of Helen Condelli of Medford and Virginia Legner of Westwood, the loved and cherished grandmother of Jillian Ells, Jonathan and Tiffany Ells, Daniel Silvia and his fiancée, Paula Goguen, Mary Silvia, Michael and Kathy Camoscio and David Camoscio and the adoring great-grandmother of Elizabeth Ells and Molly Camoscio.

Funeral arrangements were by the Frank A. Welsh & Sons Funeral Home, Chelsea. In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to the Arthritis Foundation, 29 Crafts St., Ste. 450, Newton MA, 02458

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Police Briefs 05-12-2016

Monday, 4/25

Anna Andrades, 54, 768 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for distribution of Class A drug, conspiracy to violate drug law.

Olga Torres, 55, 113 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for conspiracy to violate drug law, possessing Class A drug.

Francisco Correa, 40, 28 Malden St., Everett, was arrested for conspiracy to violate drug law, distribution of Class A drug.

Brian Kobs, 31, 14 Reynolds Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for interfering with police officer, threat to commit crime, 6 warrants.

Carla Borum, 48, 165 Cottage St., Chelsea, was arrested for being incapacitated person.

Oscar Oliva, 24, 1926 Franklin Rd., Nassua, NY, was arrested on a warrant.

Julio Mota, 34, 442 Sumner St., East Boston, was arrested for robbery, armed firearm & masked, aggravated assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, robbery, firearm-armed & masked, aggravated assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, 3 counts of intimidation.

Michel Nogueira, 24, 122 Bennington St., East Boston, was arrested for robbery, firearm-armed & masked (2 counts), aggravated assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (2 counts), intimidation (3 counts), trespassing.

William Rios, 44, 220 Webster Ave., robbery, firearm-armed & masked ( 2 counts), aggravated assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (2 counts), intimidation (3 counts) receiving stolen property +250 (2 counts), trespassing.

Jeffrey Jean-Charles, 27, 104 Bow St., Everett, was arrested for trespassing.

Tuesday, 4/26

Nain Montiel, 46, 87 Garland St., Everett, was arrested for trespassing.

Claudia Dias, 42, 189 Campbell Ave., Revere, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Wednesday, 4/27

Dionicio Ayala-Roche, 30, 155 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Claudia Dias, 42, 189 Campbell Ave., Revere, was arrested for affray, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and disorderly conduct.

Eddie Bailey, 47, 122 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Eddie Bailey, 47, 122 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Joyce Ratcliffe, 55, 32 Annese Rd., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Farah Ibrahim, 21, 4 Clinton Ct., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Diego Merino, 27, 119 High St., Haverhill, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Wilver Merino, 36, 206 Lexington St., East Boston, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, disorderly conduct and affray.

Thursday, 4/28

Juvenile Offender, was arrested for breaking and entering daytime for felony, larceny over $250.

Jefferson Dyett, 27, 215 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for lewd, wanton & lascivious conduct, possessing Class B drug and trespassing.

Stacy Gordon, 36, 24 Wamesit Ave,. Saugus, was arrested for lewd, wanton & lascivious conduct, trespassing, possessing Class B drug.

Friday, 4/29

Edward Craffey, 67, 8 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested for conspiracy to violate drug law, possessing Class B drug.

Deqyann Whyte, 24, 14 Torrey St., Dorchester, was arrested for distribution of Class B drug, possessing to distribute Class B drug, possessing to distribute Class A drug, Conspiracy to violate drug law, intimdation, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Adrianna White, 25, 55 Milk St.,Methuen, was arrested on a warrant.

Saturday, 4/30

Juvenile offender, was arrested on probation warrant.

Christopher Gallagher, 48, 1 Breed Ave., Woburn, was arrested for unarmed robbery, assault and battery on pregnant person.

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Police Briefs 03-03-2016

Monday, 2/15

Tiffany Green, 23, 124 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

Tuesday, 2/16

Anthony Ferullo, 26, 14 Union Ave., Everett, was arrested for shoplifting.

Sergio Amado, 26, 124 Bow St., Everett, was arrested for operating a motor vehicle unlicensed and for shoplifting.

Wednesday, 2/17

Mary Sackor, 29, 25 Staniford St., Boston, was arrested on warrant and possessing Class B drug.

Justin West, 43, Kasneck House, Malden, was arrested for possessing Class B drug.

Thursday, 2/18

Steven Carter, 48, 7 Brinsley St., Dorchester, was arrested for assault and battery, assault with a dangerous weapon, attempted murder, assault and malicious destruction of property.

Bianca Gell, 18, 104 Lindon St., Everett, was arrested for receiving stolen motor vehicle, receiving stolen credit card, furnishing false and withholding evidence from criminal proceeding, breaking and entering nighttime vehicle/boat for felony.

Juvenile Offender, 16, Everett, was arrested for receiving stolen motor vehicle, possessing heroin.

Brian Belew, 30, 179 Franklin Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for conspiracy to violate drug law, trespassing and possessing heroin.

Rose Sheehy, 34, 828 Salem St., Malden, was arrested for sexual conduct for a fee.

Friday, 2/19

Sidney Pierre, 28, 16 Reynolds Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for possessing to distribute Class A drug, conspiracy to violate drug law.

Pamela Blankinship, 46, 625 Main St., Reading, MA was arrested for forge/misuse RMV document, conspiracy to violate drug law.

Saturday, 2/20

Bladimir Aracia-Lopez, 31, 691 Saratoga St., East Boston, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Peter White, 46, 40 Powder House Rd., ext., Medford, was arrested for shoplifting, furnishing false name and on a warrant.

Phillip Ruiz, 43, 120 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Sunday, 2/21

Isidoro Cruz, 46, 27 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Miguel Rodriguez, 23, 155 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for probation warrant.

Lynne Walsh, 54, 132 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (2 counts) and on a warrant.

Christina Dorsi, 29, 48 Suffolk ST., Medford, was arrested for shoplifting.

Monday, 2/22

Okbay Bahatu, 31, 318 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Melvin Maldonado, 29, 25 Whittier St., Boston, was arrested on a warrant.

Tuesday, 2/23

Nathan Andrews, 31, 46 Tudor St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Abele McCabe, 30, 423 Eastern Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Wednesday, 2/24

Omar Baires, 36, 57 Grove ST., Chelsea, was arrested for affray.

Nain Montiel, 46, 87 Garland St., Everett, was arrested for affray.

Philip Hebert, 38, 2022 General Delivery, Boston, was arrested on a warrant.

Thursday, 2/25

Juvenile Offender, 27, was arrested on warrants.

Friday, 2/26

Edward Perez, 25, 501 Washington St., Lynn, was arrested for disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Kelley McDougall, 29, 58 Newcomb Rd., Stoneham, was arrested for operating motor vehicle with suspended/revoked license and reckless operation of motor vehicle.

Guillermo Duran, 41, 11 John ST., Chelsea, was arrested for possessing Class B drug, conspiracy to violate drug law.

Miguel Figueroa, 22, 116 Hawthorne St., Chelsea, was arrested for distribution of Class B drug, possessing Class B drug, possessing ammunition without FID card, conspiracy to violate drug law, possessing to distribute Class B drug and drug violation near school/park.

Saturday, 2/27

Claudio Flores, 42, 83 Chester Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operation of motor vehicle unlicensed.

Wayne Clark, 58, 10 Magnolia St., Dorchester, was arrested for possessing to distribute Class A drug, possessing to distribute Class B drug, possessing to distribute Class B drug, drug violation near school/park.

Jocelyn Valentin, 29, 23 Eleanor St., Chelsea, was arrested on probation warrant.

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Displaced Tenants at Broadway Glen Worry about Apt. Conditions

Long before a flood inundated several floors of the Broadway Glen low-income high rise apartment building on Sept. 12, tenants said owners had allegedly sat on reoccurring problems that plagued the building, and tenants who are now displaced from the building are worried about what their apartments will look like when they return later this month.

Police are still looking for a suspect who is pictured on surveillance video opening a Fire Department standpipe in the stairwell of the sixth floor, unleashing thousands of gallons of water on the residents below and causing more than $500,000 in damages. Yet, as the police continue their investigation, tenants who have been displaced have been on a mission of their own to get the attention of a landlord they say has been unresponsive and hasn’t answered their questions.

“We heard the alarms go off, but we didn’t go out because the alarm goes off all the time,” said Jamie Vasquez, who has lived in the building for six years with her three young children. “We thought something was just wrong with the fire alarm again. Then I looked up and the water was coming out of the ceiling. I opened my door and water was everywhere. My closets were full of water. All of my kids’ clothes were ruined and had to be thrown away. We lost almost everything and we’ve been in a hotel every since. We were evacuating the building when we realized that a handicapped man was trapped inside. Nobody was here to help. The owners weren’t here. We went in and helped bring the handicapped man out. There wasn’t anyone else. I want some answers about all of this, but I don’t even get an apology. No one says they’re sorry.”

Tenants are now dealing with what to do with October’s rent payments, and an attorney has been brought in by the Chelsea Collaborative to advise tenants about what to do with rent and damages.

“I’m surprised it’s been three weeks and the landlord hasn’t done anything,” said Attorney Ed Rice. “This is a multi-million dollar building and it seems like there hasn’t been anything done. You have people who are displaced and have no way to cook or eat…The landlord needs to step up and take responsibility. The landlord is part of the issue.”

The landlord, Sam Horowitz of Capital Realty Group in Spring Valley, NY, said his company is frustrated that the police have not caught the perpetrator yet. He said they are doing everything they can to accommodate tenants.

“Tenants see only one side of it,” he said. “We really do care about accommodating them. “We’re trying to make accommodations there for tenants in alternate housing or hotels. All residents that are requesting accommodations have been moved to hotels…I know there are some frustrations and we’ve been addressing them when they come through…In fact, we’ve relocated many of them from hotels without kitchens to suites with kitchenettes. We’re doing all that we can to accommodate them.”

Many tenants have been living in hotels since the flood as renovations have begun on the apartments. Many of the apartments have been partially stripped to the studs and tenants cannot return. They have been told they will be living in the Wyndham or the Residence Inn until Oct. 25. At that time, they will move back in.

However, in the interim, they said things have not gone well.

There is no property management company, but employees within the building are assigned to manage problems and concerns. Tenants said these employees were in over their heads after the flood, and the ownership was not responsive to the disaster at all.

One tenant had a video made of a meeting with building employees. He had been meeting with them about accommodations for a quadriplegic man who was his neighbor and was displaced to a hotel room that had a bed that was horribly inappropriate for his disability.

In that video, the building worker is heard telling the tenant that the owner is on a Jewish holiday and cannot be bothered until next week regarding the quadriplegic man’s predicament.

There are incidents where diabetics and cancer survivors on strict diets are placed for weeks on end in hotel rooms without the ability to cook.

“I’m a cancer survivor and have had bone marrow transplants,” said tenant Roberto Rodriguez Lugo. “I am on a strict diet because of that and my doctor is trying to keep me out of the hospital for a year. I can’t eat things from outside. I have no immune system and if I get sick, that could be it for me. I have a very specific diet that I have to follow and I need a kitchen to prepare my food.”

Rodriguez said he was not initially given a hotel room, even after he complained conditions were making him sick, but was suddenly told in late September to pack seven days’ worth of clothes and go to a hotel. That room, he said, didn’t have a kitchen and having to eat prepared food has affected his condition. It was only after a great deal of haggling that, he said, he was transferred to a room with a kitchen.

Now, when he gets back, he said he is fearful of what he will find.

“I am fearful about returning to the apartment,” he said. “It was everything to me. I couldn’t really leave. It was my safe haven. It’s dangerous for me to be in crowds because of my immune system. What am I going to find when I come back? Right now, dust is everywhere. If they want to continue with construction while we’re here, that cannot happen.”

Even with the upheaval, the problems, Rodriguez said, are not new. Last winter in the midst of one of the season’s brutal snowstorms, the building lost heat, and nothing was done for days – despite an order from the Fire Department.

“We went for two or three days here without heat right in the middle of a storm last year,” he said. “A boiler broke and the Fire Department came and said everyone had to leave. They didn’t take us out though. We were freezing in our room. They didn’t do anything. The management told me they knew about my health situation and just didn’t care.”

Vasquez said she has had problems with mice forever.

“We have been living in horrible conditions,” she said.

Cecilia Viera said she continued living in her apartment after the flood, but eventually had to demand that they move her to a hotel, which came about 10 days after the flooding.

“All those days I was living in here,” she said. “I was out of breath in here and had a horrible rash. I was sick. There’s always been a lot of problems here and I’ve lived here 16 years.”

Robin Yianacopolus said it is routine to have elevators at the high rise not working, and to have the back door locked because it is broken.

“The elevator is out all the time, and on Aug. 28 this summer, both elevators were out,” she said. “I remember because a man on my floor, who is a renal patient, had his catheter bag break and his personal care attendant, who lives on the 11th floor, couldn’t get down to help him. She should always be able to get to him. We also have 122 units here and 10 washers and dryers. Nine out of 10 times, some don’t work. They always repair them, then they break again.”

She said she worries for her neighbor, Edward Bunn, who is a diabetic and in Stage 3 kidney failure while living in a hotel room for a month.

“How do you keep a diabetic alive who is in Stage 3 kidney failure with only a small fridge and a little microwave?” she asked. “That’s inhuman. The owner is absent. We only saw them the following Thursday after this happened. It took them a week to come here and look at it. You can’t expect anything from them.”

Meanwhile, at an impromptu meeting with Attorney Rice last Thursday morning in the lobby of the building, tensions were running high.

One mother, who declined to give her name, was having trouble getting the $10 stipend for food from the landlord. They had told her it would take a week, and she said food pantries only give out food that requires cooking. With all her food ruined from the flood and living in a hotel with her children, she was in tears and at wits end.

“They told me that next Friday they would give me a check, but that doesn’t feed my kids right now,” she said, in tears. “That’s something that had to be done yesterday. I went to the food pantries, but they only give out stuff I can’t cook because I’m in a hotel room without a kitchen. What am I supposed to do?”

Horowitz told the Record on Wednesday that his company will be relocating all tenants in hotels to suites with kitchens likely by today, Oct. 8.

“By tomorrow they will all the r

Cecilia Viera stands in what used to be the kitchen of her apartment in Broadway Glen. Viera has been displaced by the flood that occurred on Sept. 12, and she and other tenants say inaction by the landlord has made the catastrophic flood even worse.

Cecilia Viera stands in what used to be the kitchen of her apartment in Broadway Glen. Viera has been displaced by the flood that occurred on Sept. 12, and she and other tenants say inaction by the landlord has made the catastrophic flood even worse.

elocated to suites with kitchenettes per their request,” he said. “I think it is likely that by tomorrow they will all be moved to accommodations that satisfy their needs.”

Attorney Rice fielded numerous questions, and the Chelsea Collaborative announced that they have established an escrow account for tenants who wished to deposit rent payments until they have returned and find conditions satisfactory.

Rice, however, said the process was likely to play out for quite some time. “This is going to be very frustrating,” he told tenants. “It’s going to be months, not days and weeks.”

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