Police Briefs 12-28-2017

Police Briefs 12-28-2017

Monday, 12/11

Stephanie Scali, 26, 207 Winthrop St., Medford, was arrested for possessing Class B drug.

Willie Jennings, 37, 251 Heath St., Jamaica Plain, was arrested for trespassing.

Kerven Julce, 33, 10 Lawrence St., Brighton, was arrested on a warrant.

Carlos Diaz, 44, 69 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Tuesday, 12/12

Salvador Pineda, 30, 153 Saratoga St., East Boston, was arrested on a warrant.

Jodelle Gabelus, 28, 41 Polk St., Charlestown, was arrested on a warrant.

Wednesday, 12/13

Ely Feliciano, 21, Address unknown, was arrested on a warrant.

Thursday, 12/14

Frank Dangelo, 64, 9 Sixth St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Caroline Cash, 22, 84 Otis St., Winthrop, was arrested on a warrant.

Friday, 12/15

Jose Gonzalez, 20, 64 Beacon St., Chelsea, was arrested for breaking and entering nighttime for felony, possessing burglarious instrument, larceny from building, resisting arrest, and malicious destruction of property and trespassing.

Juvenile offender, 16, was arrested on a warrant.

Dawid Sanek, 19, 56 Congress Pl., Dedham, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon and unarmed robbery.

 

Sunday, 12/17

Samuel Pensamiento, 26, 61 Meadow Ln., Lowell, was arrested for leaving scene of property damage and leaving scene of injury.

Read More

City Hall Clock Tower Unveils New Lighting Scheme

City Hall Clock Tower Unveils New Lighting Scheme

By Seth Daniel

Let there be light atop the Chelsea City Hall.

This Monday, the City officially unveiled a light illumination feature in the clock tower of City Hall – a feature that can be seen prominently from Rt.

The Chelsea City Hall clock tower has finally been illuminated after many years of advocacy by Councillor Matt Frank. The project was unveiled on Monday and displays holiday-themed colors at the moment.

The Chelsea City Hall clock tower has finally been illuminated after many years of advocacy by Councillor Matt Frank. The project was unveiled on Monday and displays holiday-themed colors at the moment.

1 and the Soldiers’ Home and adds some variety to the Chelsea skyline.

When it went on Monday night, the new lighting scheme alternated green and red colors to match the City’s new Christmas decorations in the downtown area.

The lighting coincided with the last meeting of Councillor Matt Frank, who has long asked for the City to look into introducing some creative lighting on the exterior of City Hall.

Afterward, he said he was very happy to see that the City had taken his request seriously and had actually implemented it before he left office.

“I am beyond delighted that the City was able to complete the first phase of the clock tower light project on the eve of my last City Council meeting,” he said. “It’s a project I have been pushing for since the late 2000s and I am hoping they take the next step by installing outdoor lights to also bring light to the outer structure. Currently the lights are going red and green for the holidays and I’ve been told they are considering using the new lights for snow emergency purposes with a blinking blue.

“Combined with the fixing of the lights on the clock tower, this gives the City a powerful new tool when it comes to civic pride,” he  continued. “The lights can be used to signal victory for our high school teams, to show holiday spirit and to showcase City Hall as a beacon for miles in every direction. Symbolism is a powerful thing. Hopefully this light will play it’s part in helping to bring more civic engagement to City Hall.”

Meanwhile, City Manager Tom Ambrosino said he gives all the credit to Frank and to Fidel Maltez of Public Works.

“It’s just another small part of our efforts to improve the Downtown,” said Ambrosino. “I have to give the credit for the idea to Councilor Frank. I would have never thought of that on my own.”

Read More

St Rose Piazza Christmas Décor Turns Heads on Broadway

St Rose Piazza Christmas Décor Turns Heads on Broadway

By Seth Daniel

Parishioners at the St. Rose Church on Broadway have returned to put up their spectacular Christmas light display this year on the new piazza. The volunteers spent most of 2016 building out the new structure, and this year is the first year they have been able to fully decorate it for Christmas – a tradition that goes back about six years.

Parishioners at the St. Rose Church on Broadway have returned to put up their spectacular Christmas light display this year on the new piazza. The volunteers spent most of 2016 building out the new structure, and this year is the first year they have been able to fully decorate it for Christmas – a tradition that goes back about six years.

An electrified Nativity scene outfitted with a blazingly bright star is just one of the many spectacular light displays on the new piazza to the north of St. Rose Church – a light display that started humbly a few years ago and now has grown to great proportions.

Father Hilario Sanez said the annual display is back this year courtesy of many dedicated parishioners from the Vietnamese-speaking contingent of the Parish.

The 20 or so men dedicate their time year in and year out to build out the bright display for the community and to honor the Christmas holiday.

The effort is now made all the more special due to the piazza patio that is in place to the north of the church – a patio that supports the colorful light display even more than the previous lights.

Cuong Pham led the Vietnamese parishioners in installing the piazza in the summer and fall of 2016. Working late into the night on weekdays and weekends, parishioners built out on a volunteer basis the new structure so that the church could host better get-togethers outside.

Their dedication to the project was unmatched, as many of those working came to volunteer late into the night after working full-day shifts in the construction industry.

Now, after a year break from the Christmas lights, this month the crew of Vietnamese parishioners were back to work putting up the light spectacular.

Within the community, many have commented on the display, and noted that the City’s new Christmas lights compliment the St. Rose display perfectly – making the downtown area much more festive.

Read More

Standish Steps Down,Collaborative’s Gladys Vega to Planning Board

Standish Steps Down,Collaborative’s Gladys Vega to Planning Board

By Seth Daniel

In the last meeting of the year for the City Council, members voted in several new appointments and re-appointments to City boards – including the approval of long-time activist Gladys Vega to sit on the Planning Board.

Vega received a 10-0 vote with Councillor Giovanni Recupero being absent for all the appointment votes.

Vega said she was looking to get more active in the City’s committees, especially since there has been a call for more people to fill the volunteer – yet critical – roles. She said she planned to become increasingly active in City matters in the coming years if all goes well on the Planning Board.

Meanwhile, Chelsea Housing Chair Tom Standish stepped down from the Board after a monumental and tremendous job in his role as chair for the past several years.

Former CHA Board member Bert Taverna was voted in 10-0 to replace Standish.

Standish was one of the first members of the new Board appointed by the state and former City Manager Jay Ash when the CHA went into receivership following the Michael McLaughlin scandal.

Standish was a solid presence on the Board in the years following the scandal, helping to  put the once-troubled CHA back onto solid footing after the fleecing done by McLaughlin to virtually every part of the organization.

Standish led the Board throughout the difficult process, and helped to take it from a troubled agency to a top performer.

After those two appointments, there was Council politics that entered the room, with Councillor Damali Vidot clashing with Councillor Roy Avellaneda on the nine re-appointments.

Vidot has been a staunch advocate for getting new and different people on the City’s boards and said she discovered in the Charter that the City is required to advertise open Board and Commission seats. However, due to an oversight, that hasn’t been done in some time.

Avellaneda disputed that such a thing was in the Charter, and read Section 4 that did not include any such language.

However, after some tussling between members, City Manager Tom Ambrosino said it is in Section 9 of the Charter and it was an oversight. He said he will begin to advertise quarterly any openings in the English and Spanish-language newspapers.

To make a point, Vidot voted against all nine re-appointments, which were mostly non-controversial and resulted in 9-1 votes of approval.

Planning Board member Todd Taylor did elicit some controversy, as he was approved by a vote of 7-3, with Councillors Judith Garcia, Vidot and Avellaneda voting against him.

Those voted in on a 9-1 vote were:

  • Olivier del Melle, Dudley Street, Planning Board
  • Emmanuel Tellez, Broadway, Board of Health
  • Robert Pereira, Gerrish Avenue, Historical Commission (replacing Ilana Ascher)
  • George Pazos, Union Street, Traffic & Parking Commission
  • Marlene Jennings, Breakwater Drive, Cultural Council
  • Mark Rossi, Clark Avenue, License Commission
  • Robert Lynch, Shawmut Street, Conservation Commission
  • Frances Mascolo, Breakwater Drive, Historical Commission.

Read More

Vidot Set to Become Next Council President

Vidot Set to Become Next Council President

By Seth Daniel

By a preliminary vote of 8-0, Councillor Damali Vidot received the support of her colleagues to become the new Council President in 2018 during a meeting on Monday.

The annual Conference Committee on leadership took place Monday with two possible candidates, current President Leo Robinson and Vidot. Both had been vying for the position behind the scenes, lobbying their colleagues for the position.

However, Robinson apparently had withdrawn his name before Monday’s conference, conceding the gavel to Vidot.

Those voting for Vidot to be president were Councillors Luis Tejada, Yamir Rodriguez, Giovanni Recupero, Calvin Brown, Bob Bishop, Enio Lopez, Robinson and Judith Garcia.

Vidot did not vote for herself, and Councillor Roy Avellaneda did not show up for the Conference. Councillor-elect Joe Perlatonda was absent during the president vote.

Vidot said she was honored to receive support from her colleagues, and will lean on the experience of long-time councillors to help her with the new role.

“I am honored to have received the support of my colleagues in serving as president of Chelsea City Council,” she said. “It is a responsibility I do not take lightly. I intend on leaning on the experience of longer-serving councillors while building on the passion and ideas of newer colleagues. We all have something different we bring to the table and I want to honor all of those voices while working cohesively on the concerns of our hard-working residents.

“More importantly, I want to ensure that we are always adhering to our City Charter and it’s ordinances and ensuring that the process is always fair and transparent,” she continued.

The vice president role was more hotly contested, with Councillor-elect Brown getting the nod over Recupero in a vote of 6-4.

Those voting for Brown were Vidot, Rodriguez, Brown, Bishop, Lopez, and Garcia. Those voting for Recupero were Tejada, Recupero, Robinson, and Perlatonda.

Avellaneda was not present for the vote.

Tejada was unanimously elected as the new School Committee liaison in a vote of 10-0, with Avellaneda absent.

The Council also participated in the annual drawing for Roll Call vote order and seating order.

Vidot will be the first vote next year in any roll call, with Recupero being the last vote.

In seating, there will be some interesting neighbors – with Councilors Recupero and Perlatonda sitting next to one another again. The old friends sat next to one another when Perlatonda was on the Council previously. Oddly enough, Perlatonda will also sit next to Garcia, who replaced him two years ago and whom he has criticized from time to time. Bishop will site on one end of the Council, while Calvin Brown will sit on the other end.

Read More

Plan, Wash Hands and Stay Healthy for the Holidays

Plan, Wash Hands and Stay Healthy for the Holidays

By Seth Daniel

The holidays present a unique month-long time of the year when people often can find themselves in a much different pattern than during the rest of the year. Such changes can often lead to unhealthy behaviors or illnesses – and triggers for those struggling with overeating disorders or substance use disorders.

Going into the holidays with a plan and a watchful eye – from the dinner table to the kids’ toys – is a necessity.

To learn how to stay healthy during this unique time of year, why not ask the best?

Dr. David Roll, a primary care physician for all ages and the medical director at the CHA Revere and CHA Everett Primary Care practices, was recently named on of the region’s Top Doctors in the Boston Magazine December issue. The annual list looks at top doctors in every specialty and in primary care as well.

Roll said he is fortunate to have a good team around him, and that is crucial in medical care delivery.

“I’m very fortunate to have a great team in Cambridge Health Alliance and at our clinics in Everett and Revere, with a great range of physicians, physician assistants, nurses and other staff to help improve the health of our communities,” he said. “Medicine today is a team sport and there are no top doctors without top teams.”

From the area’s Top Doctor, here are some things to watch for on the holidays as it relates to one’s health.

Q: Many people find it hard to stay healthy over the holidays. There are numerous flus, colds and other maladies that are brought into parties and celebrations. What are the best precautions to take over the holidays?

A:  I make sure everyone in my family gets a flu shot and I advise all my patients to do the same. It’s not possible to get the flu from the shots we use today. If you won’t do it for yourself, do it for the kids and grandparents in your family, who could end up in the hospital if they get the flu from you. Also, cover your cough and wash your hands frequently – simple but important.

 Q:  Food and the holidays are literally tied at the hip. For a lot of people, keeping to a diet or keeping a healthy eating pattern is difficult. What do you recommend?

A:  It’s all about balance. If you’re snacking more during the day, take a small plate for dinner. If you’re planning for a big holiday meal, eat light and drink lots of water throughout the day. If you want to try everything, take a bite or two of each dish.

 Q:  Everyone always talks about post-holiday depression. Is that really a thing? If so, how can people prepare for it and do they need to?

A:  I think it’s real. Sometimes people feel there’s nothing to look forward to after a long-awaited vacation and time with family. One solution is to schedule an event or a long weekend two or three weeks after the holiday – something else to look forward to. As the new year approaches, you might also want to think about scheduling your annual physical for 2018, to talk with your care team or schedule any health screenings that are overdue.

 Q:  Is it an old wives tale that one can get sick by going out in the cold without a hat and coat, or is there some medical soundness to that old claim?

A:  It’s mostly myth. Cold temperatures and dry air make a slightly more hospitable environment for some viruses in your nose and throat.  But colds are caused by viruses and the main reason people get more colds in the winter is spending more time indoors with other people.

 Q:  What are some of the common holiday-associated problems that patients have presented to you and your staff over the years?

A:  This time of year we see a lot of people worried about a persistent cough. Most people aren’t aware that the average duration of a cough is about 18 days. Usually it can be controlled with home remedies or over-the-counter medications, and it rarely requires antibiotics. At the CHA Revere Care Center, we offer sick visits Monday-Friday and Saturdays until 1 p.m., to help people who need to been seen for an illness.

Q:  Are there signs that parents should watch for in their children both before, during and after the holidays?

A:  Aside from the usual respiratory and stomach viruses, this is the time of year when food, fuel, and housing insecurity have their sharpest sting, and disproportionately affect our most vulnerable patients, especially the young and the old. For those who can, it’s a great time to think about donating to local food pantries and supporting the services that are most needed in the winter.

 Q:  Substance abuse can invade the holidays for some people. How do you address that with patients who struggle with substance use disorders?

A:  If you’re in recovery, make a party plan in advance for those high-risk or high-stress occasions:  Go late, leave early, and take a sober friend along. If you are struggling, don’t be afraid to ask for help. The assistance you need may be as close as a friend, a coworker, your doctor’s office at Cambridge Health Alliance, or one of our partners in the community.

 Q:  There are a lot of toys and gifts that can be harmful or dangerous to children. Should parents think about toy safety over the holidays, or is that overdoing it?

A:  Well-meaning family and friends often give gifts that are not appropriate to a child’s age. Age limits are on toys for a reason, mostly to prevent younger children from choking on small parts. In the end, there is no substitute for parental supervision, especially with small children and small toys. Also, if you gift a bike or skateboard, buy the protective gear to go with it.

 Q:  What is your favorite holiday treat?

A:  I love date bars, just like my mother used to make. It’s one of those rich treats you have to balance with good eating, especially if you can’t resist a second trip to the dessert tray.

Read More

Chelsea Hill Walking Group Formed Out of Community Spirit

Chelsea Hill Walking Group Formed Out of Community Spirit

By Seth Daniel

Members of the new Chelsea Hill Community neighbor group gather on the stairs near Lafayette Avenue earlier this fall. The group formed after a neighbor day in Malone Park last September, and their momentum continues to build.

Members of the new Chelsea Hill Community neighbor group gather on the stairs near Lafayette Avenue earlier this fall. The group formed after a neighbor day in Malone Park last September, and their momentum continues to build.

What started as a summer get-together for neighbors near the Chelsea Soldiers’ Home neighborhood has turned into an effort that has logged many miles this fall within their community.

Now dubbing themselves the Chelsea Hill Community, the group has grown significantly and engages in safety walks and meetings on a monthly basis.

On the first Wednesday and third Thursday of every month at 6 p.m., the group walks the streets of the neighborhood. On the fourth Thursday, they hold community meetings at 6 p.m. in the First Congregational Church on County Road.

It’s something that has been as much a surprise to the founders as it is to newcomers and those who have been in the neighborhood for years.

Monica Elias-Orellana, a life-long Chelsea resident, said the idea was born out of the Community Enhancement Team (CET) efforts, which focuses neighborhood betterment projects citywide.

Elias-Orellana is part of that effort, and she and Councillors Yamir Rodriguez, Luis Tejada Yahya Noor and Pastor Ellen Rohan Ball had scheduled a clean up of Malone Park.

Then on Sept. 2 this year, they decided to hold a ‘Meet Your Neighbor’ day as a follow up, enlisting Councillor Roy Avellaneda, Henry Wilson, City Manager Tom Ambrosino and Councillor Damali Vidot to the effort.

“After that day, we decided that we should try to keep the momentum going,” said Elias-Orellana. “We’re an independent residential group and we are now called the Chelsea Hill Community. We do similar things to the existing Sector Groups, but we also do events as a neighborhood too.”

The walks have been very productive and the group has added a police officer to accompany them. They are now doing winter walks and plan to have hot chocolate and cookies to accompany the effort.

“We have a lot of momentum right now, and I think this is something we can keep going for a long time,” said Rodriguez. “I think we can make this group strong enough to join the other groups in Sector 4 or in Admiral’s Hill.”

Rohan Ball said the meetings have brought many of her members of the First Congregational Church on County Road a lot of comfort.

“At one of the meetings, two sisters who are members of the church and had to leave Chelsea after the Great Fire of 1972, were reminiscing,” she said. “It really brought them back. I felt this instant happiness that I was thrilled to see. They enchanted us with stories of the fire and the old neighborhood. It was really great to have the newer neighbors come back with the old neighbors and learn from one another.”

The group is also trying to address an early concern of the elderly in the neighborhood, that being the task of shoveling snow. Working with the Boys & Girls Club, they are hoping to organize volunteers from the Club who will shovel the walks for elderly folks during snow storms.

Elias-Orellana said what is important about their group now is that they have recruited a strong base of neighbors who are passionate. That, she said, will endure even the coldest winter walks.

“We’re a small group now, but it doesn’t matter if we have 30 or 50 people, we are a group of passionate people who are looking to be impactful where we live,” she said.

The next Chelsea Hill Community Walk will be on Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. Check their Facebook page for the latest location.

Read More

Life Terms for Two Convicted in Murder of Roca Worker in JP

Life Terms for Two Convicted in Murder of Roca Worker in JP

Two men convicted last week of murdering 21-year-old Kenny Lamour as he worked on a Roca snow-shoveling crew in Jamaica Plain in 2015 were sentenced to life in prison Dec. 4.

At the conclusion of their Suffolk Superior Court jury trial last week, Donte Henley, 27, and Josiah Zachery, 21, were found guilty of second-degree murder for Lamour’s 2015 shooting death.

Judge Peter Lauriat sentenced each to life in prison with the possibility of parole after a minimum of 20 years. Zachery, who was also convicted of unlawful possession of a firearm and assault with a dangerous weapon, was ordered to serve an additional four to five years in prison, to be served after he has completed the sentence on his murder conviction.

During the course of the trial, Assistant District Attorneys Ian Polumbaum and Nicholas Brandt presented evidence and testimony to prove that Henley and Lamour were each members of a snow-shoveling crew organized by Chelsea non-profit agency Roca on Feb. 11, 2015.

Though the two men were known by the agency to be affiliated with rival gangs, each told a Roca crew supervisor that they could work together without issue.

Phone records, however, proved that Henley began to plot Lamour’s murder through an exchange of text messages with Zachery. In the messages, Henley expressed hostility toward Lamour and told Zachery to come to the Jamaica Plain worksite with a gun. Henley later provided Zachery with Lamour’s location and clothing description.

Zachery located Lamour on Centre Street and, at approximately 10:35 a.m., opened fire, striking Lamour in the head.

As Zachery fled on foot, he was pursued by a Boston Police officer. The evidence proved that Zachery pointed his gun at the officer and fired a single shot as he ran. The officer was not struck, and additional Boston Police soon located Zachery nearby on Centre Street. He was carrying shovel but had no gloves and was wearing sneakers rather than snow boots, prosecutors said. Boston Police located a resident of a nearby resident who reported that a shovel matching the one Zachery was carrying had been stolen.

Elise McConnell was the DA’s assigned victim–witness advocate. Henley was represented by James Budreau and Zachery by Robert Wheeler.

Read More

Collaborative, Other Groups Make Statement for the Rights of Chelsea Day Laborers

Collaborative, Other Groups Make Statement for the Rights of Chelsea Day Laborers

By Seth Daniel

The group is shown on the steps of the Shawmut Street residence.

The group is shown on the steps of the Shawmut Street residence.

The Chelsea Collaborative joined with two other human service agencies this month to begin several “actions” to put employers engaging in wage theft on notice that they will not let it go – even if employers manipulate a so-called loophole in the City’s pioneering Wage Theft Ordinance.

On Nov. 30, about 20 activists and one man who said he was owed nearly $3,000 in unpaid wages from a flooring company, marched up Shawmut Street to the home address of the owner – who has registered the construction business from his home.

“This is something we are doing to let employers know we will not stand by and watch the struggle of workers due to non-payment of wages,” said Yessenia Alfaro-Alvarez, of the Collaborative, while standing on the stoop of the purported wage violator. “At this time, we want to send a message and that’s why we’ve come out here. This is one of the parts of the law where we believe there is a loophole. That is with businesses that register from their homes. It’s very hard to track them.”

Jose Becerra was one of three workers owned money from the construction company. In total, all three are suspected to be owned $9,000 from the Chelsea company.

He was there with about 19 other activists who were prepared to deliver a letter directly to the owner of the company. The owner didn’t answer the door, and activists yelled up to he and his wife to no avail.

“Right now, it’s the loophole that is the problem,” said Sylvia Ramirez of the Collaborative. “Businesses don’t register. They are not in compliance, but the City isn’t aware of them. They have to find a way to investigate and cure this condition.”

The action is part of an overall effort to fight for workers rights, which was bolstered this week on Tuesday when the Collaborative launched its new ‘Journaleros’ project at its existing Workers Center. That Center has been around for 15 years, but now graduates from the Center are looking to empower other workers – primarily day laborers on the fringes who frequently have wages stolen.

Those workers are often recognized by the fact that they wait on certain corners in Chelsea, where construction companies will drive by and pick them up to work for the day.

Many of those corners are in the Shawmut Street and Central Avenue areas, while another major place is at the Home Depot in the Parkway Plaza.

“The project consists in organizing workers in the corners,” read a release from the Collaborative. “This project will allow us to educate these workers to prevent wage theft. The workers will acquire the right tools to defend and protect their rights as day labor workers.”

The project kick-off included canvassing many local businesses and also going to the major “corners” where workers are picked up.

As for the loophole, City Manager Tom Ambrosino said he isn’t clear about what the City could do. He said the City is only able to penalize someone for wage theft by not giving them a City contract or not giving them a municipally-required license.

He said the only fix would be to deny business certificates to those violating the Wage Ordinance. However, he said what would likely happen is small companies operating out of homes would simply not get a certificate, which is required only every four years.

“I suppose we could add a section that says the City Clerk can’t issue a Business Certificate…if a company has similar wage violations,” he said. “But, honestly, that statute is impossible to enforce, and we generally rely upon the goodwill of folks to come in and register. It is not as though this municipality or any municipality has a way of keeping track of every business operating from a home address.”

He said if there are licenses, such as liquor licenses, issued by the License Commission, they could have a better handle on it, but for private companies not needing such a license, it would be difficult.

“What is likely to happen if we added such a provision to our Wage Theft Ordinance is that someone who couldn’t secure a Business Certificate from the City Clerk because of Wage Violations would simply avoid getting one,” he said.

Read More

Massachusetts RMV Takes Steps to Make More Customers Eligible for Online Transactions

Massachusetts RMV Takes Steps to Make More Customers Eligible for Online Transactions

The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) is taking steps to allow more customers the opportunity to renew a driver’s license or ID card online. The RMV has extended the length of time a customer can use a license photo from 9 years to 14 years which means more customers than ever are eligible for online renewals.

In addition, customers will be eligible to renew their licenses or ID cards online for two consecutive renewal periods.  This will result in approximately 30,000 additional renewal transactions eligible to be processed online each month.  With thousands of additional customers now eligible to conduct renewals online, the amount of customers who must visit a service center will decrease, which will make in-person transactions more efficient for customers who do need to visit RMV service locations.

“The Registry is pleased to offer these helpful enhancements to service options that are currently available to our customers,” said Registrar of Motor Vehicles Erin Deveney. “We encourage customers to conveniently renew their driver’s license or MA ID card online if they are eligible to do so, saving a trip to a service center and perhaps avoiding holiday traffic too.”

Licenses and ID cards will need to be renewed in person at RMV service centers or AAA locations (for AAA members) every third renewal period (once every 15 years).  Customers should also know that they don’t need to wait for the RMV’s birthday card reminder to renew.  They can go online and renew up to 12 months in advance.

To be eligible for online renewal, a customer’s license/ID card photo must be less than 14 years old and must have been taken after the customer’s 21st birthday.

The RMV invites license and/or ID card holders to visit www.mass.gov/how-to/renew-your-drivers-license to check their license status and renew online.

Effective March 26, 2018, the RMV is changing the way customers get and renew their driver’s licenses and ID cards. On that date, the RMV will begin to issue driver’s licenses and ID cards which meet the federal requirement for credentials which are REAL ID compliant.

Massachusetts residents do not need a REAL ID until after October 2020, and will only need a REAL ID for air travel or to enter a U.S. government building.  On October 1, 2020, the following credentials will be accepted where REAL ID is required:  a valid U.S or foreign passport, U.S. passport card, military ID, or a driver’s license or ID that is REAL ID compliant.

Anyone with questions about REAL ID may visit: www.mass.gov/realID.

Additional information can be found on the website of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security: www.dhs.gov/real-id-public-faqs.

Read More