School Budget Cuts Starting to be Felt in the Community

School Budget Cuts Starting to be Felt in the Community

Closing a $3.1 million budget gap is never painless, but now in the weeks after those cuts were announced, many in the community are starting to take notice.

This week, one of the most notable cuts that is being discussed is the removal of the librarian from the Chelsea High  School (CHS) Library.

Supt. Mary Bourque said the cuts, including the librarian, were part of the School Committee’s attempt to deal with state funding discrepancies that have been dealt to the City over the last few years. She pointed out that last year, the Schools had to cut the elementary school librarian as well.

Now, the school system is left with only two librarians at the Middle School level.

Bourque said they had to prioritize teaching and learning, as well as their turnaround plan that is already in place. When making tough decisions, the librarian at CHS was a hard, but clear, choice.

“We needed to stay close, first and foremost, to the principles that would help meet the needs of our students,” she said. “We used data and we based the decision on the data. This is our third year of budget cuts. It’s illustrative of the broken state funding formula…This year we’re cutting the librarian at the high school because of the standards we stood on. We looked at the data and circulation numbers are down. Kids at the high schools are doing a lot of research online now. There were only about nine books a day being checked out for a 1,500-student body.”

Speaking up big for the CHS librarian was fellow librarian Martha Boksenbaum, who is the Children’s Librarian at the Chelsea Public Library. She said a school librarian shouldn’t be sacrificed, especially since the librarian at the elementary school was cut last year.

“One might argue that if there isn’t a School Librarian, students can just go to the Public Library instead,” she wrote in a letter to the Record this week. “In reality a School Librarian does things the Public Library cannot possibly do. School Librarians are part of the school; they know the teachers, the teachers know them and they work together on a daily basis so School Librarians can make sure students have what they need to complete their assignments.

“Students in Chelsea deserve more than this,” she continued. “While school funding is tight and hard decisions have to be made, this is a sacrifice Chelsea High students should not have to make.”

Bourque said she did a survey and found that most schools in the area were down to one librarian districtwide. That was true in Revere, Saugus and Malden. In Winthrop, there is no librarian in the schools.

In Chelsea, they left the two middle school librarians because they also teach classes, where the elementary and high school librarians did not teach.

“Librarians are the support services for students and are necessary, but when you have to decide whether to increase class sizes by keeping the librarian or keeping class sizes at 30 and cut support services like librarians, that the choice,” she said. “We can’t cut the teachers in the classrooms.”

The school librarian was only a small part of the cuts made to the School Budget.

Other cuts included:

  • Three administrative positions.
  • 10 instructor positions.
  • Two whole-class paraprofessionals.
  • 10 one-on-one paraprofessionals.
  • Discontinuation of the 5th to 8th grades Citizens Schools at the Brown Middle and Wright Middle Schools.
  • Mandatory Connect Digital Lead Teacher Platform.
  • Reduction in the extraordinary maintenance and technology budget.

Of all of those, Bourque said they needed to be careful about pushing off the maintenance and technology budget.

“You can only do that so many years in a row before it comes back to bite you,” she said. “We have to be careful in doing that.”

Meanwhile, Bourque said the cuts are a call for the community to unite in lobbying the entire legislature to support Senate Bill 2325, which was proposed by Sen. Sonia Chang Diaz. Bourque said that bill contains all of the fixes to make sure cuts like this wouldn’t have to happen for a fourth year in a row.

“It behooves us all to be on the same path with our advocacy,” she said.

House Budget contains pothole account to help schools like Chelsea

The House Budget passed last week by the state House of Representatives has some encouraging news regarding school financing – and word from Beacon Hill is that the funding changes will outlast any vetoes from Gov. Charlie Baker.

The House put in a $12.5 million “Pothole Account” to help districts hurt by the change in ‘Economically Disadvantaged’ definitions a few years ago. Last year, there was no such funding, but this year it looks like that money will make it through.

The money would be allocated to the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), and they would be charged with disbursing it to the affected district.

Supt. Mary Bourque said the pothole account in the House Budget is good news, but she hopes that there are some changes.

“First of all, $12.5 million will go fast,” she said. “I have asked Sen. Sal DiDomenico to petition that DESE isn’t in charge of disbursing that account…We need to get it passed first, but second I would like to see that DESE isn’t in charge of that money.”

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Chelsea Public Library – Wingmasters Bird Exhibit

Chelsea Public Library – Wingmasters Bird Exhibit

Six birds of prey that are native to Chelsea were presented during the Chelsea Public Library’s Wingmasters Bird Exhibit on April 7. Jim Parks and his partner, Julie Collier, rescue, rehabilitate, and release raptors such as eagles and osprey. The falcons, owls, and hawk displayed were born in the wild, but due to permanent injury are non-releasable; and so Parks and Collier care for them permanently.

“Ninety percent of the time the birds we rescue are releasable. They’re resilient,” said Parks. “Sometimes they are injured in such a way that their injuries can’t be fixed by any doctor.”

Parks and Collier visit 200 schools, museums, and libraries each year to educate the public about these remarkable animals. They work closely with Tufts Wildlife Clinic in North Grafton where veterinarians help Parks and Collier free most birds back into the wild.

“One of the biggest problems these birds deal with is their reputation. They’re often thought of as being dangerous,” explained Parks. “It’s good that we have birds of prey. These birds do us a huge favor by controlling the populations we want nothing to do with.”

Parks presented a four-ounce male, and a six-ounce female American kestrel falcon with cataracts. The female’s larger build is excellent for protecting her young; and her brown-shaded feathers keep her camouflaged.

“Falcons are built for speed because they hunt other birds. This is an incredibly difficult lifestyle,” Parks said. “They get high above the earth, close their wings and drop. They accelerate and capture a bird below. They can outfly every other bird in the world.”

The male falcon was picked up off the ground at three-weeks-old and hand fed. He bonded with a human and will never understand what it is like to be a wild falcon. Male falcons, built for hunting, are considered the most colorful bird of prey in North America.

“Unfortunately, this is a bird about to be added to the government’s endangered species list,” said Parks. “This is a bird running out of a place to live.”

Seven species of hawks live in Massachusetts, with the most common being the red-tailed hawk. The female red-tailed hawk that Parks exhibited was once a mile-high flyer. At 32-years-old, the six and a half-pound bird is the oldest bird that Parks and Collier have ever rescued. Her wing was shattered when she was hit by a car while hunting a rodent on the grassy median of Rt. 128 on Thanksgiving Day 13 years ago.

“A circling hawk is showing off his red tail in the sky as a way of telling other birds to go away,” described Parks. “When they’re hunting they stand in trees, keep their bodies still, and dart out feet first after their prey. Eagles and hawks have the best eyesight.”

Parks also showed an eastern screech owl, the most common owl living around us, a barred own, New England’s second largest owl, and the great horned owl, New England’s largest owl. Owls are one of the slowest and most silent flying birds in the world. They hide during the day, and hunt and nap at night; but because of their incredible camouflage often go unseen. Owls can also see eight times better at night than humans can, and use their acute hearing to locate prey.

“They are masters of deception. They know how to blend in,” said Parks. “No other bird looks like this. We stand upright, have round faces, and have eyes on the front, and so do owls.”

Parks explained that most birds are injured in their first year of life while they are still learning. He has been working with birds for 24 years; and prior to that worked at an engineering firm in Boston.

“As a photographer, I was always interested in the natural world,” explained Parks, who grew up in Lynn. “I liked all aspects of nature growing up.”

With decreasing habitats and an increasing human population, Parks hopes that more corporations will develop properties to accommodate wildlife.

“Impact injuries are sad because there are many man-made obstacles now in the world that cause them. Julie and I do what we do to give birds a second chance to live,” said Parks. “If you want to help, donate to an organization that buys land. If you don’t have a place to release a species, they won’t know where to go. Many animals cannot adapt, and that’s when you see animals fall off the map.”

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Garcia Selected as Political Surrogate for Senator Elizabeth Warren

Garcia Selected as Political Surrogate for Senator Elizabeth Warren

Chelsea City Councilor Judith Garcia announced that she has been selected as a political surrogate on Senator Elizabeth Warren’s reelection campaign, chosen from a sprawling list of notable political figures in the state.

Councilor Judith Garcia.

Councilor Judith Garcia.

The 26-year-old, now in her second term, kicked off her efforts to reelect Sen. Warren at the Chelsea Public Library during this past Saturday’s caucus, where Garcia served as a spokesperson for the campaign.

“Senator Warren has remained committed to protecting the most vulnerable in our community, rebuilding economic security for our working families, and making a difference in our state,” Garcia said.

“During the last six years, Elizabeth has been a devoted leader who remains connected to our residents and the issues that affect us,” continued Garcia. “She pushed for the permanent extension of Earned Income and Child Tax Credits helping to keep 250,000 Massachusetts residents and more than 100,000 children out of poverty. Her values and morals are where they need to be.”

Councilor Garcia is a native of Chelsea, who grew up in a proud Spanish-speaking household. As the City Councilor of District 5, she is the first Honduran American woman to serve on the Chelsea City Council, as well as the youngest current member. Now, Judith dedicates her time to creating government that truly represents and works for its people.

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Ward 4 Democratic Committee Elects Delegates to the State Convention

Ward 4 Democratic Committee Elects Delegates to the State Convention

Registered Democrats in the City of Chelsea Ward 4, held a Caucus on February 3, 2018 at the Chelsea Public Library to elect Delegates to the 2018 Democratic State Convention.

Elected Delegates are:

Olivia Anne Walsh

91 Crest Ave.

Luis Tejada

103 Franklin Ave.

Thomas J. Miller

91 Crest Ave.

Theresa G. Czerepica

21 Prospect Ave.

This year’s State Convention will be held June 1-2 at the DCU Center in Worcester, where thousands of Democrats from across the Commonwealth will come together to endorse Democratic candidates for statewide office, Including Constitutional officers and gubernatorial candidates

Those interested in getting involved with the Chelsea Ward 4 Democratic Committee should contact Attorney Olivia Anne Walsh, Ward 4 Chair, at 617-306-5501.

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Chelsea Public Library Holds NASA@ My Library Community Dialogue

Chelsea Public Library Holds NASA@ My Library Community Dialogue

The Chelsea Public Library (CPL) held a NASA@ My Library Community Dialogue on Jan. 31, to discuss the community’s view of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). City leaders, library and school administration, high school students, and parents participated in the casual conversation to plan programming that will positively impact the entire city and inspire a passion for STEM learning among residents.

“We should try to build bridges between what’s happening in schools and formal education, and what’s happening in the community as we develop and grow,” said Lisa Santagate, Chelsea Public Schools/Chelsea Public Library trustee. “Science pervades our lives. STEM is everywhere and all connected.”

The Chelsea Public Library is one of 75 libraries across the country that was awarded the NASA@ My Library Grant, funded by NASA and the American Library Association. The initiative collaborates with libraries to increase and enhance STEM learning opportunities and activities.

“The main focus of this grant is to help underserved groups — especially youth – find more resources within STEM, and have more models for STEM careers,” said Martha Boksenbaum, CPL children’s librarian. “Often, women and people of color are underrepresented.”

Since May 2017, CPL has hosted a solar eclipse viewing party on City Hall lawn, offered a science café for adults, and presented a series of Tinker Time Workshops for children to explore scientific instruments such as a green screen and inferred thermometers.

Some panelists explained that, while there are elementary school events and an abundance of library programs for children, teenagers are an underserved population. Members of the community suggested increasing connections to the schools and library, and creating a more inviting atmosphere for young adults.

“In school there are a lot of classes in biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering, but it’s usually announced to the younger kids, and I think that’s great. The younger you are when you learn about science, the more you love it,” said Stephanie Alvarado, Chelsea High School senior. “We do tree mapping and water quality testing. That’s how I’m able to connect with STEM, but not the community as a whole.”

One of the main concerns mentioned during the community gathering was outreach to local STEM professionals that Chelsea residents could better relate to.

“A struggle I am experiencing in implementing this grant is showing examples of role models. I would like to represent people of color and women, but when I reach out, they are overwhelmingly not a representation of the majority of people here in the community,” explained Boksenbaum. “If the kids are learning that somebody next door is in a STEM field and looks like them, then they’re going to feel like that’s something they can do as well.”

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Chelsea Public Library Wins NASA@ My Library Grant

Chelsea Public Library Wins NASA@ My Library Grant

The Chelsea Public Library announced Tuesday that it has been awarded a grant from NASA and the American Library Association called NASA@ My Library.

Chelsea Public Library is one of 75 libraries that have been chosen from a total of 513 applicants to receive the NASA@ My Library grant, and is the only library in Massachusetts selected to participate in the initiative.

The NASA@ My Library project is led by the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute. Partners include the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, Pacific Science Center, Cornerstones of Science, and Education Development Center. NASA@ My Library is made possible through the support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate as part of its STEM Activation program.

The Children’s Librarian Martha Boksenbaum said, “We are very excited to have won this grant, it will enable the library to bring more STEM programming to Chelsea, and build an environment of exploration, play and learning.”

The library will receive the following from this grant:

  • Two NASA STEM Facilitation Kits including STEM tools and programming materials including a green screen and solar eclipse viewing glasses
  • A $500 programming stipend
  • Travel reimbursement for the Children’s Librarian to travel to Denver, CO for training

In implementing this grant, the Chelsea Public Library will run at least three programs between May 2017 and October 2018.

  • A Solar Eclipse Viewing Party on August 21.
  • A series of workshops in which children and adults can explore the NASA Facilitation kits

materials and activities

  • An Earth Day Celebration in Spring 2018
  • Guest visits from Subject Matter Experts to engage with children and families

The Chelsea Public Library provides programming free of charge, and strives to create an environment of learning and exploration to the Chelsea community.

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Girard, Cathedral Parish Partner for Great New Housing

By Seth Daniel

On rare occasions, community institutions and residential property developers come together in synchronicity – with both parties meeting at the intersection of win-win.

The development of the Girard apartment building on Harrison Avenue, behind the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, is by most accounts just such an occurrence.

The Girard began moving new residents in to its 160-unit apartment building on Harrison and Malden Streets last weekend, continuing full-force this week, and has hopes that it has delivered the best property on the market right now.

“We’re hopeful that it will be regarded as a contemporary landmark in the community now that we’re through the construction and it is becoming occupied,” said developer and Southender Peter Roth, of New Atlantic Development. “It’s a strong building and very respectful to its historic context, but there’s nothing historic about it. It’s strikingly contemporary…Our goal is to really share information about design, architecture and the arts and build that into a community…We’ve really tried to make the experience more than having just a fantastic apartment…Now that we can move people in, qualified renters who walk through the door, and are interested, are closing the deal because the quality of our apartments. We really do have the best product on the market.”

While there are curated finishes, extensive art program, unique amenities and a noted property manager (Pezzutto Management, which is fairly new to Boston), the best part of the Girard story is the cooperation between the Cathedral, Roth and the community to produce a project nearly everyone sees as a positive in a booming area of the neighborhood.

Roth began working on the Girard soon after completing the ArtBlock condos on Harrison Avenue near the Boston Medical Center campus – a successful partnership with the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) that opened in 2008. Roth lives and works out of the ArtBlock, and got high marks from the community, something that the Cathedral’s Father Kevin Balliri heard about.

Father Balliri was in a conundrum at the time.

He had a parking lot that was very valuable, but not getting used all that much. He also had a large congregation that was unable to sustain the Parish. Putting two and two together, Father Balliri approached Roth though a mutual friend.

“He had these severe deficits,” said Roth. “He had property in an area with the largest increasing property values in New England and also he had one of the poorest Parishes in the system. He wanted to see how the land could actually sustain this institution through the future. The idea was really his. We met through a mutual friend and sat down and talked and also had to sell the idea to other members of the Archdiocese. That took time and there were complexities. It was a three-year process to assemble the land transaction. We finally succeeded in getting that ironed out.”

He added that Father Balliri’s commitment and inspiration led to a great new apartment building and a sustainable Parish.

“The reason for this project, though it’s turned into a great apartment community, was to strengthen the future of the Cathedral of the Holy Cross,” said Roth. “I think we’ve achieved that as well.”

After that great partnership was memorialized with the land transaction, Roth began designing the project with extreme care – taking a year to iron out the space plans and to dig into the details of every square inch of the Girard, right down to analyzing how the closets would work.

The thoughts behind the design were inspired by Alexander Girard – a designer from the mid-20th Century who is the namesake of the building. Girard used very contemporary design, but also leaned on bright color pallettes and the use of folk art.

Beyond that, a major influence on the spirit of the Girard came from the living room of the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum.

“It’s a room designed to be comfortable with big couches and comfortable chairs and rugs from Afghanistan,” said Roth. “It has a wonderful Library and you want to spend some time there. We thought if we could create anything like that, it would be a success. We took that space and…tried to emulate that spirit. Yes, we copied some of the pieces, but it was the spirit we were after.”

The amenities for the project include one very unique thing in that there is a guest suite that any resident can reserve for a visitor. There is also 3,600 sq. ft. of retail that Roth said would likely be a restaurant, with the tenant to be announced this month.

“We see the building as something a more mature professional or empty nesters or a professional who might be coming to Boston for a post-doctoral program might be attracted to,” said Roth. “Our units are a little larger…They all have real dining areas and not a place where you struggle to find where the table goes. The kitchens are designed actually for people who like to cook. They aren’t just cabinets slapped on a wall. Some units have gas cooking ranges available, which is almost never found in apartment units. We have a great location that can support it and a great part of the neighborhood to seek out art, restaurants and parks. It has all the things people love about the South End.”

Being a resident of the South End himself, living just down the street in ArtBlock, Roth thanked the community for putting up with the construction and the seven years it took from conception to completion. He also thanked the community for the kind words of encouragement, saying it has been well received.

“Every time I’m stopped by a friend or neighbor on the street – I only live two blocks away – they are thrilled by the way it’s turned out,” he said. “It’s great to have all our hard work acknowledged by these friends and neighbors I see every day…Certainly, I will acknowledge neighbors have been immensely inconvenienced because the building fills up most of the site…We had to close down half of the street for a little longer than expected…It’s all coming to an end though…We hope neighbors will like what we’ve done and enjoy a new landmark in the South End.”

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Police Briefs 07-23-2015

FIREARM ARREST ON LYNN STREET EXT.

On July 17, at 10:08 p.m. a Chelsea Police officer who was in the area of Central Avenue and Shurtleff on an unrelated call observed two young men walking away from him towards Lynn Street Extension. The officer made observations of one of the two males pull out what was believed to be handgun. He then observed a single muzzle flash and the discharge of the weapon. The two fled on the approach of the officer. He and other responding officers placed the two juveniles into custody on firearm charges and recovered the firearm.

The officer believed the gun was most likely accidently discharged when the suspect removed it from the waistband. No injuries or intended victims were noted. The firearm recovered has been turned over the State Police Crime Lab for analysis.

POLICE TO SPONSOR CHILD FINGERPRINTING JULY 27

Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes announced that the Chelsea Police would be conducting two events in the coming weeks for children and elderly.

On Monday, July 27, from 4-6 p.m., the Police will be at the Chelsea Public Library for child fingerprinting and identification kids. The goal is to aid parents and guardians in keeping their children safe through the fingerprinting program. The fingerprint kids can be done in the library or at home and the information will belong to the family. The police will not keep the prints or the kits.

For questions on the initiative, contact the police at (617) 466-4855.

Another service for elderly resident called SafetyNew Service is also being debuted by police, but not in the library event.

The service helps police find and rescue people who wander and get lost in the city. SafetyNew by Lojack aims to protect residents with autism and Alzheimer’s Disease. The CPD has been trained and certified on the SafetyNet service. Officers are equipped with search and rescue equipment so they are able to locate anyone who signs up for the program and goes missing.

Lojack provides emergency support 24-hours a day.

The service uses bracelets for the wrist or ankle that emit a signal. Chelsea Police can detect the signal from the bracelet within a one-mile radius during searches.

To sign someone up, called the CPD at (617) 466-4855.

CHA EMPLOYEE SENTENCED

A former executive of the Chelsea Housing Authority (CHA) and a former public housing inspector were sentenced this month for their roles in rigging the inspection process of federally funded housing units.

James Fitzpatrick, 63, of Acton., and Bernard Morosco, 50, of Utica, NY, were sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Douglas P. Woodlock to three months and six months in prison, respectively, and one year of supervised release. The two were convicted in April 2015 of conspiring to defraud the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) by impairing, impeding, and defeating the proper operation of HUD’s inspection process.

Pursuant to federal regulations, to determine whether a public housing authority is meeting the standard for its residents of conditions that are “decent, safe, sanitary, and in good repair,” HUD’s Real Estate Assessment Center (REAC) is required to “provide for an independent physical inspection of a public housing authority’s property or properties that includes, at a minimum, a statistically valid sample of the units in the CHA’s public housing portfolio to determine the extent of compliance with the standard.” REAC inspections are conducted by independent contractors who have received training from REAC on the inspection protocol and applicable regulations, and have been certified by HUD. Once certified, an inspector is given an inspector number, and with a password, can access the secure REAC server, which contains data on all public housing authorities and also later enable the inspector to generate a random sample of units to inspect on the scheduled date of the inspection.

Before the REAC inspections of the CHA in 2007, 2009, and 2011, Morosco gave Fitzpatrick, the Assistant Director of the CHA, an advance list that revealed which units at the CHA would be inspected. During those years, Morosco, who was a REAC-certified inspector, worked for the CHA as a consultant, advising the CHA about how to get better scores on its REAC inspections.

One or two months before each REAC inspection, using information provided by Fitzpatrick, Morosco accessed HUD’s secure database and downloaded information to which he was not entitled. That information enabled him to use his REAC software to generate, in advance, the random sample that would later be generated by the assigned REAC inspector. Morosco then gave the samples to Fitzpatrick who, in turn, provided it to the CHA’s Executive Director, Michael McLaughlin.

McLaughlin divided CHA employees into pairs, calling each pair a “SWAT team,” and sent them to inspect the units identified by Morosco. For the month before each inspection, the “SWAT teams” visited several apartments a day, inspecting and re-inspecting them as maintenance crews visited the units to make repairs, fumigate, and exterminate. When the REAC inspectors conducted the inspections, the units that were selected were the same as the ones provided in advance by Morosco.McLaughlin, the former Executive Director of the CHA, was previously sentenced to serve an additional 12 months in prison for this offense after having already been sentenced to 36 months for other illegal conduct involving the CHA.

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Police Briefs 07-16-2015

POLICE NAB ALLEGED DRUG DEALER

Chelsea Police Announced the arrest of Angelo Ciocco, 58, of Revere, for Trafficking in Cocaine and other related charges. Chelsea Detectives assigned to the Drug Control Unit utilizing controlled buys and surveillance of several transactions throughout the city obtained a search warrant for Ciocco’s Revere home on July 1.

Police recovered 450 Grams of Cocaine and over $10,000 in cash. Police also seized two vehicles used in the illegal operation.

Ciocco was arraigned in Chelsea District Court.

SHOOTING INCIDENT ON MARLBOROUGH

On July 6 at 5:55 a.m., units were dispatched to the area of Broadway at Marlborough Street for a report of a victim of a shooting.

Upon arrival, Officers already in the area quickly learned there was no victim to be found.

Witnesses stated they observed two people fighting, a male party wearing a black shirt with black shorts and another male wearing a white shirt. They told officers they heard what they believed to be gunshots. A witness stated he then observed the male party wearing all black shoot at the person wearing the white shirt. He stated the male party wearing the white shirt was running away from the shooter. At that time, he stated he called 9-1-1 and never lost sight of the shooter (male party wearing all black). No victim was found and a check of area hospitals revealed no victim.

The alleged suspect was observed by officers and placed into custody. No firearm was recovered. Officers checked area to find the firearm, but did not recover any after an extensive search.

Ramon Valdez-Sanchez, 30, of 43 Eleanor St., was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, discharging a firearm with 500 feet of a dwelling, burning land/tree, carrying a dangerous weapon, possessing a firearm silencer, carrying a loaded firearm without a permit, firearm violation with three prior violent/drug crimes, possessing ammo without a permit, possession of a firearm without a permit (2nd offense), and assault and battery.

‘SNITCH’ REMARK GETS ARREST

On Saturday, July 11, at 1:41 a.m., officers were dispatched to 74 Spencer Ave. for a report of a man being assaulted. While en route, they received further information that possible suspects were fleeing the area. While officers were on scene tending to victims and speaking to witnesses, other officers located the alleged suspect and brought him back to be identified. While the suspect observed the witnesses cooperating with the police he began to make threatening statements toward the witnesses. Officers indicated he was yelling at them for being “snitches” and vocally cursed them for cooperating with police.

The suspect was arrested on scene and charged for such, and taken into custody after a struggle.

Maslah Ibrahim, 23, of Kingston, was charged with disorderly conduct and intimidating/harrassing a witness.

POLICE TO SPONSOR CHILD FINGERPRINTING JULY 27

Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes announced that the Chelsea Police would be conducting two events in the coming weeks for children and elderly.

On Monday, July 27, from 4-6 p.m., the Police will be at the Chelsea Public Library for child fingerprinting and identification kids. The goal is to aid parents and guardians in keeping their children safe through the fingerprinting program. The fingerprint kids can be done in the library or at home and the information will belong to the family. The police will not keep the prints or the kits.

For questions on the initiative, contact the police at (617) 466-4855.

Another service for elderly resident called SafetyNew Service is also being debuted by police, but not in the library event.

The service helps police find and rescue people who wander and get lost in the city. SafetyNew by Lojack aims to protect residents with autism and Alzheimer’s Disease. The CPD has been trained and certified on the SafetyNet service. Officers are equipped with search and rescue equipment so they are able to locate anyone who signs up for the program and goes missing.

Lojack provides emergency support 24-hours a day.

The service uses bracelets for the wrist or ankle that emit a signal. Chelsea Police can detect the signal from the bracelet within a one-mile radius during searches.

To sign someone up, called the CPD at (617) 466-4855.

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