Summer Youth Job Lottery Takes Place at City Hall

City Manager Tom Ambrosino and members of the Chelsea Collaborative held a lottery on April 4 to pick the names of scores of young residents who will secure a summer youth employment job.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino picks names for the summer jobs lottery.

Director Gladys Vega said that while it was a time to celebrate the employment of more than 100 youth in the community, the need was far greater than the jobs.

“This year we received more than 300 applications, with more that came after the deadline,” she said. “Due to our funding, we are able to offer only 150 spots this year. We are excited to pair youth with more than 40 of our longstanding partners, including City of Chelsea, Chelsea Police, Intergenerational Literacy Program, Jordan Boys & Girls Club, North Suffolk Mental Health and others.”

At the lottery, 185 names in several different age groups were selected.

Some were put on a waiting list, and a vast majority of those applying were of a younger age.

Youth that were picked in the lottery are now going through several interviews this week, during School Spring Break. If they successfully pass those interviews, they will meet their employers in June and receive more training.

The Summer Youth Employment Initiative (SYEI) begins on July 1.

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License Commission Approves License for Carnival at Chelsea Commons

The carnival is coming to Chelsea.

On Wednesday, April 3, the Licensing Commission approved a four-day license for New Hampshire-based Fiesta Shows to hold a four-day carnival on the Chelsea Commons this spring.

During the short public hearing to approve the license, Chelsea Police Captain Keith Houghton said the City’s public safety agencies have never had an issue with Fiesta Shows. The company also runs events nearby in Revere and Lynn, among other communities.

At-Large City Councillor Roy Avellaneda said he’s had experience with Fiesta Shows owner John Flynn in the past, and that Flynn has always run a tight and secure ship with his shows. In addition, Avellaneda noted that Fiesta Shows will make a donation to the City’s summer jobs program.

Licensing Commissioner Roseann Bongiovanni said she did have some concerns about the carnival operating until 11 p.m., especially on Thursday night.

Flynn said while the license has the closing time at 11 p.m., festivities and rides typically wind down around 10 p.m., giving police time to sweep the area by 11 p.m. Music and amplification is usually shut down at 9 p.m., he added.

•In other business, the Commission denied a permit that would have allowed for Friday night social events at the Rincon Hondureno Function Hall at 194 Broadway. Commission members and City officials expressed concern that the social night would effectively turn the function hall into a nightclub.

•The Licensing Commission also approved a liquor license transfer for La Esquina Mariachi Restaurant at 170 Washington Ave., the former site of the Plaza Mexico restaurant.

The pastor and parishioners from the neighboring church expressed concerns about the new restaurant, given their experience in the past.

While the Commission approved the license, members asked that the owners are mindful of the past history at 170 Washington Ave.

“You need to be very conscious of the environment you are stepping into,” said Licensing Commission Chair Mark Rossi. “Please don’t disappoint us.”

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Top 100

Top 100

The City released the 2018 payroll figures for the City of Chelsea this week. The top earner was once again Chief Brian Kyes at $230,344, as per his recent contract. For the police earners, much of the gross salary listed also include detail pay, the vast majority of which does not come from City funds. Of the Top 10 highest paid, eight were from the Police or Fire Departments. City Manager Tom Ambrosino checked in at number 10, making $180,441.

NAME TITLE EARNINGS

Brian Kyes Chief of Police $230,344.33

Joseph Fern Sergeant $211,872.46

Thomas Dunn Captain Police Dept. $205,872.85

Waynen Ulwick Deputy Chief $203,288.67

Keith Houghton Captain Police Dept. $197,453.50

David Batchelor Captain Police Dept. $194678.46

John Quatieri Deputy Chief $183,497.21

Mary Bourque Superintendent 225 $182,148.98

Robert Houghton Deputy Chief $182,019.22

Thomas Ambrosino City Mgr. $180,441.72

Hector Gonzalez Sergeant $176,440.18

Michael Thompson Captain Fire Dept. $166,379.54

Michael Masucci Deputy Chief $166,189.31

Paul Giancola Deputy Chief $166,978.20

Edwin Nelson Lt. Police Dept. $164,488.50

Michael Addonizio Sergeant $162.911.18

Edward McGarry Deputy Chief $161,706.80

David Flibotte Sergeant $160,531.80

Rony Gobin Capt. Fire Dept. $158,983.82

John Noftle Sergeant $156,654.04

Robert Denning Capt. Fire Dept. $156,582.07

Leonard Albanese Fire Chief $156,436.80

Paul Doherty Capt. Fire Dept. $156,210.97

William Dana Capt. Police Dept. $155,886.74

Daniel Delaney Lt. Police Dept. $153,015.37

William Briquela Sergeant $151,980.26

Stephen Purcell Capt. Fire Dept. $151,220.30

Michael Gurska Capt. Fire Dept. $150,926.52

David Betz Lt. Police Dept. $149,452.67

Scott Conley Patrolman $148,971.14

William Krasco Patrolman $148,129.25

Thomas McLain Patrolman $147,994.81

Brian Dunn Lt. Police Dept. $146,432.04

Richard Wilcox Lt. Fire Dept. $146,159.30

Lyle Abell Patrolman $145,456.77

Robert Moschella Patrolman $144,743.05

Linda Breau Dep/Asst. Superintendent $144,048.58

Anthony D’Alba Sergeant $143,491.93

Richard Carroccino Capt. Fire Dept. $142,271.06

Robert Cameron Deputy Chief $141,745.95

Priti Johari Asst. Super 225 $141,549.97

Philip Rogers Capt. Fire Dept. $141,486.55

Nicole McLaughlin Patrolman $138,758.46

Gerald McCue Director Exempt $138,498.37

Jacqueline Maloney Principal 220 $138,370.05

Michael Lee Capt. Fire Dept. $137,816.45

David Rizzuto Lt. Police Dept. $135,789.24

Edward Keefe Deputy City Mgr. $134,355.42

Richard Perisie Deputy Chief $133,742.54

Jon Maldonado Patrolman $133,573.84

Angelica Guerra Patrolman $133,489.66

Adele Lubarsky Principal 220 $133,299.92

Philip Merritt Capt. Fire Dept. $133,167.89

Sarah Kent Asst. Super 220 $132,598.96

Randy Grajal Teacher $132,365.77

Anthony Tiro Lt. Fire Dept. $129,619.11

Cindy Rosenberg Director/SPED $129,238.46

John Bower Lt. Police Dept. $129,087.69

Michael Villanueva Patrolman $128,705.88

Michael Nee Sergeant $128,519.44

Ronald Schmidt Principal 220 $128,419.34

Stephen Garcia Patrolman $128,106.06

Joseph Capistran Patrolman $128,032.49

Garrison Daniel Patrolman $127,915.71

Linda Barber Asst. Principal $127,803.92

Gary Poulin Firefighter $127,245.49

Sylvia Vazquez Teacher $126,762.71

Joseph Stutto Patrolman $126,042.52

Mark Martineau Asst. Principal $125,942.86

David Bishop Lt. Fire Dept. $125,542.09

Michelle Martinello Principal 220 $125,500.04

Christian Lehmann Lt. Fire Dept. $125,163.61

Jose Torres Firefighter $124,622.98

Joanne O’Brien Patrolman $124,618.74

Michael Noone Patrolman $124,616.70

Richard Bellomo Patrolman $124,592.28

Michael Talbot Principal 200 $123,749.98

Mark Aliberti Lt. Fire Dept. $123,739.98

Augustus Casucci Patrolman $123,288.79

Cheryl Fisher City Solicitor $122,859.54

Adam Deleidi Principal 220 $122,500.04

Paul McCarthy Patrolman $121,779.06

Paul Marchese Patrolman $121,317.29

Star Chung Patrolman $121,169.07

Joseph Cooney Dir. Of Blgds/Grounds $121,153.88

Julie Shea Principal 220 $120,750.11

Nathaniel Meyers Principal 220 $120,500.05

Christopher Troisi Patrolman $120,363.74

Daniel Dejordy Lt. Fire Dept. $120,334.37

Long Lam Patrolman $118,106.45

Carlos Vega Patrolman $117,787.32

Joan Sullivan Director Exempt $117,584.55

Bertram Taverna Dir. Of Public Works $117,344.83

Juan Sanchez Patrolman $117,235.48

Alan Beausoleil Coordinator $116,774.31

John Coen Sergeant $116,114.05

David Batchelor Patrolman $116,023.49

Robert Brown Capt. Fire Dept. $115,978.37 Damon Peykar Coordinator $115,667.73

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Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

A Lynn teen, who was originally from Chelsea, pleaded guilty March 7 as his trial was set to begin on charges that he opened fire during a party three years ago, killing 19-year-old Pablo Villeda and injuring six others.

Emanuel Marrero, 19, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in connection with Pablo Villeda’s March 6, 2016, shooting death, as well as six counts of armed assault with intent to murder and related charges for injuries suffered by six other young people.

Pablo Villeda was killed in an early morning teen party on March 6, 2016 held at a vacant apartment on Washington Avenue. On Thursday, March 7, Emanuel Marrero pleaded guilty in court to his murder.

Judge Linda Giles imposed the mandatory sentence of life in prison, ordering that he be eligible for parole after 15 years and that his sentences on the non-fatal shootings be served concurrently. Had he chosen to go to trial, the defendant – who was 16 at the time of the homicide – would have faced a first-degree murder charge.

“We accepted this plea because it delivers a significant measure of accountability for the defendant’s actions, which took Pablo’s life just as it was ready to begin,” District Attorney Rachael Rollins said. “It also considers all the potential outcomes at trial and on appeal, as well as the defendant’s age at the time of the homicide. Nothing we do can bring Pablo Villeda back to his loving family, but I hope this final result can at least provide them with closure to this tragic event.”

Chief Brian Kyes said he hopes the prison sentence will bring closure to the family on what was a tragic night in Chelsea three years ago.

“This was certainly a tragic night for everyone involved and one that none of us will soon forget,” said Kyes. “We truly hope that the imposition of this prison sentence by the Suffolk County Superior Court will bring some sense of solace to the family of Pablo Villeda that they absolutely deserve. Senseless acts of violence like this have no place in our neighborhoods and we will continue to work with our community partners to prevent tragedies like this from ever occurring again.”

Chelsea Police responded to 120 Washington Ave. in the early morning hours of March 6, 2016, for multiple calls reporting a disturbance at a party held inside a vacant apartment. They arrived to find seven people, ranging in age from 15 to 22, suffering gunshot wounds. Pablo was rushed to the hospital but succumbed to his injuries; the surviving victims were treated at Whidden Memorial Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Assistant District Attorney Julie Higgins of the DA’s Homicide Unit was prepared to introduce evidence and testimony showing that the defendant brought a .40 caliber handgun to the party, flaunting it to several other attendees. At some point, the evidence would have shown, the defendant confronted the victim and opened fire. Pablo was mortally wounded and six other people were struck, and fortunately survived their injuries. The defendant fled the scene but was identified in the course of an exhaustive investigation by Chelsea Police detectives and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit. The defendant was represented by attorney Richard Chambers

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Police Briefs 02-28-2019

Police Briefs 02-28-2019

By Seth Daniel & Paul Koolloian

Blocking the Way

On Feb. 11, at 10:05 a.m., an officer on foot patrol in Bellingham Square observed a group blocking the foot traffic in front of 427 Broadway – forcing a family with a small child to walk onto the street. One male became agitated at the officer’s request to move and became load and disorderly while refusing to move. The officer with the assistance of other officers placed the male into custody after a brief struggle.

Michael Catino, 35, of East Boston, was charged with assault, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Crack Cocaine Bust

On Feb. 12 the Chelsea Police executed a search warrant at 90 Chestnut St. #3. The search warrant was the result of an investigation into a male subject for the distribution of crack cocaine from that address. During the course of the investigation, the CPD purchased narcotics from the address. The male subject was placed into custody.

John Venete, 33, of 90 Chestnut St., was charged with possession to distribute cocaine.

Squattin’ in the Cellar

On Feb. 15, officers were dispatched to 26-28 Spencer Ave. for the report of two unwanted individuals. The officers spoke to the landlord who led them to the basement of the property. Officer’s located two males in the basement. Next to the men was a handful of needles and drug paraphilia. One male was found to have illegal pills on his person. Both were arrested.

Jeff Bosquet, 36, of Everett; and Stephen Morgan, 30, of 55 Heard St., were both charged with trespassing and possession of a Class C drug.

Broke into Van

On Feb. 16, at 2:45 a.m., officers were on patrol in the area of the Bellingham Street Bridge by the Silver Line Overpass when they observed a motor vehicle in the middle of the road with its lights off, parked next to a van. As the officers approached the vehicle, two males and a female known to the officers exited the vehicle. The car had a broken rear window. The officers made contact with the owner who responded and told officers the window had no damage when he parked the car earlier. The victim also told officers that tools were also missing from the car. All three were placed under arrest.

Jeff Bosquet, 36, of Everett; David Kerns, 43, of Revere; and Jaclyn Doucette, 29, of Revere; were all charged with breaking and entering in the night for a felony and larceny/receiving stolen property under $1,200.

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Pupusa Fiesta to Come to Chelsea on April 7

Pupusa Fiesta to Come to Chelsea on April 7

The pupusa is a curious delicacy – part tortilla, part cheese – and full of ‘yum.’

In Chelsea, it is an art form and nearly a dozen restaurants in the city have their own brand and take on the pupusa, and this spring, the Chelsea Prospers initiative will hold a community party dedicated for the art of the pupusa.

Come hungry.

Mimi Graney and Edwardo Chacon unveiled the idea on Feb. 6 during a meeting of the Chelsea Prospers committee, and said it will be the opening salvo in a season that will include the recently-announced Chelsea Night Market.

“We have been reaching out to all the local restaurants, and we have seven on board so far,” said Chacon. “A lot were surprised at first. They were very surprised the City was doing this. The reaction was pretty positive though and we will have a lot of participation.”

The idea will be to bring together the best pupusa makers in the city to vie for the 2019 Pupusa Champion of Chelsea. The event will take place a Emiliano’s Fiesta and will be an inside event.

There will be judges and audience voting on who makes the best pupusa, and the City would take hints from El Santaneco Restaurant, which has a pupusa-eating contest every November.

There would also be awards for the best salsa and the most creative vendor display at the event.

Graney said they would also have a booth dedicated to the history and the culture of the pupusa, and the center of the room would feature a demonstration on how to make homemade pupusas.

An idea has been floated out to have the Police Department and Fire Department engage in a pupusa-eating contest at the fiesta, but that is still up in the air.

“The idea is to bring the community around this special food item, whether it’s a contest or an event,” said Chacon. “We want them to come out with their family and enjoy their city.”

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Police Briefs 02-14-2019

Police Briefs 02-14-2019

SHOTS FIRED MONDAY

On Feb. 11, at 9:01 p.m., officers responded to the era of 111 Bellingham St. for a report of shots fired. Sources indicated that seven shots were registered on the ShotSpotter system. There were no reported injuries, but detectives collected ballistic evidence in the area. Police are continuing to collect video in the area to attempt to identify those involved.

STABBING ON SHURTLEFF STREET

On Feb. 7, at 2:32 p.m., a 17-year-old male was stabbed once in his arm on Shurtleff Street at the corner of Bellingham Street. The injury was non-life threatening, and the injured victim was released from the hospital later that day. CPD detectives investigated the incident and secured an arrest warrant for an individual believed to be responsible for the attack. During the event, the Williams School was placed in a soft lockdown. That order was lifted a short time later. The search for the individual is on-going.

ARMED ROBBERY

On Feb. 4, at 12:08 a.m., officers were dispatched to an armed robbery at 200 Congress Ave. The victim was delivering Chinese food for a local restaurant. While parked at the drop off address a male approached the victim and pointed a firearm at her and stole her money. Officers searched the area and observed subjects that matched the description. They placed a male under arrest who had on his person a pellet gun.

Jainie Lopez, 21, of 139 Marlborough St.; and Mauricio Lainez, 21, of 234 Central Ave., were both charged with armed robbery.

POLICE RETURN CUSTODIAL KIDNAPPING VICTIM

On Feb. 5, at 8:30 a.m., Chelsea officers along with the US Marshall service executed an arrest warrant at 49 Orange St. The subject of the order was placed in custody without incident. The Warrant was a full extradition warrant that was issued Dec. 4, 2018 from North Little Rock District Court in Arkansas. The incident involved a parental kidnapping that originated in that state, and was concluded in Chelsea.

Latricia Rucker, 34, of 49 Orange St., was charged as being a fugitive from justice.

DRIVING DRUNK ON ESSEX

On Feb. 8, at 10:55 p.m., a CPD officer was dispatched to Essex Street at Hawthorne Street for a report of a white pickup truck that struck a parked motor vehicle. The operator of the white pickup was reportedly still behind the wheel of the vehicle. Officers responded to the scene and removed the driver from the car. Based on a conversation with the operator and after administering a roadside assessment, the officers formed the opinion the driver was operating under the influence of alcohol. He was placed into custody on the scene.

German Quinonez-Cal, 38, of 70 Hawthorne St., was charged with operating under the influence of liquor.

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Gov. Baker Re-files Bill to Protect: Communities From Dangerous Individuals

Gov. Baker Re-files Bill to Protect: Communities From Dangerous Individuals

Chelsea Chief Brian Kyes introduced Gov. Charlie Baker to a room of police chiefs from around the state during Tuesday’s meeting of the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs of Police Association. The meeting took place in Everett, and Gov. Baker made a major public safety policy announcement at the gathering in regard to criminal background checks. See Page 5 for more photos.

Standing alongside Chief Brian Kyes, Gov. Charlie Baker on Tuesday re-filed legislation to provide law enforcement and the courts with additional tools to ensure dangerous criminals are held in custody pending trial.

First filed on September 6, 2018, the proposal would expand the list of offenses that can provide grounds for a dangerousness hearing and close certain loopholes at the start and end of the criminal process that currently limit or prevent effective action to address legitimate safety concerns. Governor Baker made the announcement in Everett at the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs of Police Association Meeting, an Association Chief Kyes is the leader of.

“Public safety is a fundamental responsibility of government and in order to fulfill that duty, we must allow local police and district attorneys to effectively deal with people who repeatedly break the law,” said Governor Baker. “Last session we enacted several provisions to ensure that a small lapse in judgment doesn’t ruin a life, and we must now give law enforcement, prosecutors and the courts the tools they need to keep our communities safe. We look forward to working with the Legislature to pass this important bill.”

The proposal will strengthen the ability of judges to enforce the conditions of pre-trial release by empowering police to detain people who they observe violating court-ordered release conditions; current law does not allow this, and instead requires a court to first issue a warrant.

“Loopholes in the current system limit or prevent effective action to address legitimate safety concerns,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “This bill will empower law enforcement with the flexibility and tools they need to protect their communities from dangerous defendants.”

Under this proposal, judges will be empowered to revoke a person’s release when the offender has violated a court-ordered condition, such as an order to stay away from a victim, or from a public playground. Current law requires an additional finding of dangerousness before release may be revoked.

“A defendant’s past criminal history should absolutely be considered as a factor at any such dangerousness hearing rather than just the alleged crime that is currently before the court,” said Kyes, Chelsea Police Chief and President of the Massachusetts Major City Chiefs. “It is essential that in conducting a proper risk analysis in order to determine whether the defendant is to be considered a potential danger to any victim, witness or to the public in general, that their past criminal history – especially as it pertains to previous convictions for violent crimes – is considered and weighed based on its relevancy pertaining to a demonstrated propensity to commit violence. This bill will rectify the existing gap that currently occurs during a dangerousness hearing.”

The legislation also expands the list of offenses which can provide grounds for a dangerousness hearing including crimes of sexual abuse and crimes of threatened or potential violence. It also follows the long-standing federal model in including a defendant’s history of serious criminal convictions as grounds that may warrant a dangerousness hearing. Current law requires courts to focus only on the crime charged and ignore a defendant’s criminal history when determining whether the defendant may be the subject of this sort of hearing.

Additional provisions of this legislation:

•Improves the system for notifying victims of crimes of abuse and other dangerous crimes when a defendant is going to be released by creating clear lines of responsibility among police, prosecutors and corrections personnel to notify victims about an offender’s imminent release from custody, and create a six-hour window for authorities to inform a victim before an offender is allowed to be released.

•Creates a new felony offense for cutting off a court-ordered GPS device.

•Requires that the courts develop a text message service to remind defendants of upcoming court dates, reducing the chance they will forget and have a warrant issued for their arrest.

•Allows dangerousness hearings at any point during a criminal proceeding, rather than requiring a prosecutor to either seek a hearing immediately or forfeit that ability entirely, even if circumstances later arise indicating that the defendant poses a serious risk to the community.

•Requires that the probation department, bail commissioners and bail magistrates notify authorities who can take remedial action when a person who is on pre-trial release commits a new offense anywhere in the Commonwealth or elsewhere.

•Creates a level playing field for appeals of district court release decisions to the superior court by allowing appeals by prosecutors, in addition to defendants, and giving more deference to determinations made in the first instance by our district court judges.

•Creates a task force to recommend adding information to criminal records so that prosecutors and judges can make more informed recommendations and decisions about conditions of release and possible detention on grounds of dangerousness.

The legislation also closes loopholes at the start and end of the criminal process that currently limit or prevent effective action to address legitimate safety concerns. It extends the requirement that police take the fingerprints of people arrested for felonies to all people arrested, regardless of the charge, to ensure that decisions about release can be made with knowledge of a person’s true identity and full criminal history. It also allows, for the first time, bail commissioners and bail magistrates to consider dangerousness in deciding whether to release an arrestee from a police station when court is out of session.

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Police Briefs 01-10-2019

Police Briefs 01-10-2019

STOLEN CAR

On Dec. 11 at 6 p.m., a CPD Detective observed a blue Subaru Impreza make an unsafe lane change coming from Broadway onto City Hall Avenue. The vehicle was a reported stolen motor vehicle out of Revere. The detective continued to follow the car down Chestnut Street. With the assistance from other marked CPD units a car stop was initiated and the operator placed under arrest for being in possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

Katherine Guzman, 36, of 18 Watts St., was charged with being in possession of a stolen motor vehicle.

PULLED KNIFE ON HOTEL EMPLOYEES

On Dec. 21, at 7:11 a.m., units were dispatched to the Hilton Homeward Suites for an individual threatening the employees with a knife.

A description was given out of the suspect as being a short male wearing a black jacket and a scally cap. Officers knew about a previous issue from the day before at the hotel with the same described male. The officers observed the suspect walking on Everett Avenue and placed him under arrest for two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

Alberto Garcia, 51, of 303 Carter St., was charged with two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

CROSSWALK VIOLATION, KNIVES

On Dec. 19, at 6:23 p.m., officers observed a motor vehicle that failed to stop for a pedestrian in the crosswalk in front of 589 Broadway.

The car was then pulled over.

It was determined that the operator of the vehicle was not legally able to operate the car and he was placed under arrest. A search of the person and vehicle also recovered knives.

Manuel Alvarez Mejia, 29, of 759 Broadway, was charged with crosswalk violation, operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license, and two counts of carrying a dangerous weapon.

ALMOST HIT A CRUISER, FLED

On Dec. 23, at 7:25 p.m., a CPD officer stated his cruiser was almost hit by a black motor vehicle in Fay Square. He reported the vehicle fled onto Heard Street when the officer activated his blue lights. Other Chelsea Units were able to stop the car. The driver had no license to operate a motor vehicle and was placed under arrest.

Mark Cassidy, 28, of Quincy, was charged with marked lanes violation, reckless operation of a motor vehicle, failing to stop for police, unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, stop sign violation, red light violation and speeding.

PoliceLog

Friday, 12/28

Charles Chafin, 55, 32 Tudor St., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting.

Saturday, 12/29

Edward DeSantis, 53, 12 Bates St., Revere, was arrested on warrants and operating motor vehicle with suspended license.

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Chelsea Man Arrested after Leaving Two in Serious Condition

Chelsea Man Arrested after Leaving Two in Serious Condition

Police have arrested a 24-year-old Chelsea man in connection to a shooting and stabbing at 16 Pleasant St. early Saturday morning.

Hector Emilio Hernandez, was arrested on charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm following the alleged attack, according to Jake Wark, spokesman for the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office.

Revere police and emergency medical personnel responded to 16 Pleasant St. at about 1:45 a.m. Saturday to find a 27-year-old man from Chelsea apparently shot and a 23-year old man from Chelsea apparently stabbed. Both were hospitalized. State Police detectives were notified and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit responded.

Hernandez is expected to be arraigned Monday in Chelsea District Court.

“The relationship between the parties involved remains under investigation, as do the circumstances surrounding the violent encounter,” Wark said in a statement.

Wark added that based on an investigation that continued through Saturday morning and into Saturday afternoon, troopers and officers developed information that the suspect may be in the area of Calumet Street in Revere.
Troopers and officers set up surveillance and observed a man matching the suspect’s description enter a residence on that street.

When police went to the house they observed the suspect exit a back door and try to climb a fence. He was caught and apprehended and transported to the State Police Barracks in Revere where he was booked on charges of attempted murder and unlawful possession of a firearm.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact the Revere Police Criminal Investigation Division at 781-286-8340 or the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit at 617-727-8817.

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