Chelsea Gang Member Pleads Guilty to Drug Trafficking

A Chelsea man pleaded guilty last week in federal court in Boston to possession of cocaine base with intent to distribute.

Adres Perez, 26, pleaded guilty to possession of cocaine base with intent to distribute and is scheduled to be sentenced on Sept. 10, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Richard G. Stearns. In December 2017, Perez was indicted along with Cesar Alicea, who was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm. The charging documents allege that both men were members of the East Side Money Gang.

On Oct. 31, 2017, police in Revere observed what they believed was a drug deal happening from a car. The officers stopped the car, which was driven by Perez – with Alicea in the passenger seat –removed Perez from the car, and pat-frisked him. At the same time, Alicea ran from the car and threw an item, which was recovered and determined to be a .25 caliber Raven Arms pistol. Police later recovered crack cocaine from the car and heroin on Perez.

Alicea previously pleaded guilty and was sentenced in January 2019 to 48 months in prison.

The charge of possession with intent to distribute provides for a sentence of no greater than 20 years in prison, a minimum of three years and up to a lifetime of supervised release and a fine of $1 million.

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Police Briefs 06-13-2019

By Seth Daniel and Paul Koolloian


Missing Child Reunited with Parents

On June 4, Chelsea Police reunited a missing 10-year-old Chelsea girl with her parents on after the Kelly school student told officers she fell asleep on the MBTA bus she takes home from school. The juvenile told officers she ended up at the Maverick Square MBTA station where she became confused and proceeded onto another MBTA bus that she was unfamiliar with. At some point, she left the bus in the area of North Shore Road in Revere where she began to walk on the busy road. During this time, the parents responded to the police station to report their daughter missing. Officers used the young girl’s cell phone to “ping” her location in Revere. While Chelsea, Transit and Revere Police were searching the area the young girl was located by an MBTA bus driver who transported her to the Wonderland “T” Station in Revere. She was then reunited back with her parents at Chelsea Police Headquarters. Chelsea officers are working with the parents and the school in addressing future transportation options for the young girl who was unharmed in the incident.

Struggle Without a Shirt

On May 27, at 1:20 a.m., officers responded to the area 176 Clark Ave. for a report of a disturbance. The report to officers was that witnesses were reporting they saw a male who appeared drunk, with no t-shirt on, fighting with a female who was preventing him from getting into the home. Officers struggled with the male in attempting to calm him down. After a struggle to restrain him, he was placed into custody. The male was transported to CHA Everett for evaluation prior to being booked at CPD.

Eber Orantes, 33, of 176 Clark Ave., was charged with disorderly conduct, assault with a dangerous weapon and resisting arrest.

Threated With Strange Weapon

On May 30, at 9:20 p.m., officers responded in the area of Normandy Road at Garfield Avenue for a report of a road rage incident involving a firearm. Officers were given the description of the vehicle in question. It was said to be a black Honda Accord operating on Normandy Road. CPD officers located the vehicle and found the subject to have a modified instrument that resembled a firearm. The victim in the other vehicle provided other information that led to the male being arrested.

Tanvir Zahir, 21, of Stoneham, was charged with violating the motor vehicle ordinance, violating the dangerous weapons ordinance, and two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

Swallowed Bag of Crack

On May 31, at 9:30 a.m., Officers observed a male party known to them from previous drug offenses walking with an unknown male on Chestnut Street near Fourth Street. The officers believed they then witnessed a drug transaction between the two. The subject admitted he swallowed a bag of “crack “ when he was approached by the officers. A search of his person uncovered more drugs and he was placed under arrest. The second male was identified and placed under arrest on the scene. The subject who ingested the narcotics was transported to CHA Everett for evaluation.

Argenis Felipe, 33, of East Boston, was charged with possession to distribute a Class B drug (crack), conspiracy, and distribution of a Class B drug.

Box Cutter

On May 31, at 11 a.m., officers were dispatched to the parking lot of 260 Clark Ave. for a fight in progress. Officers observed two tenants of the building in an argument. One tenant accused the second of threatening him with a box cutter. That item was retrieved and that male was taken into custody.

Jody Robinson, 59, of 260 Clark Ave., was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.

Swerved at Pedestrian

On June 1, at 9:10 a.m., an off-duty CPD officer was traveling on Hawthorne Street towards Chester Avenue when he saw a male party crossing the street. The officer noticed a Toyota Corolla laying on his horn and then began to intentionally drive towards the male party that was crossing the road. The victim had to jump four to six feet to his rear to avoid being struck by the vehicle.

The officer believed the operator swerved in his direction deliberately trying to strike the victim, which could have resulted in serious injuries. CPD officers responded to assist and the male operator was placed in custody for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Eduardo Garcia, 35, of East Boston, was charged with failing to slow, reckless operation, and assault with a dangerous weapon (car).

MS-13 Member Sentenced for Unlawful Possession of a Firearm

An MS-13 member was sentenced last week for being an illegal alien in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Nery Rodriguez Diaz, 19, a Salvadoran national who resided in Chelsea, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV to 14 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Diaz will also be subject to deportation proceedings upon completion of his sentence.

On May 22, 2018, Diaz and another MS-13 member, Elmer Alfaro Hercules, were arrested in possession of loaded firearms in Bremen Street Park in East Boston, a location where numerous MS-13 gang members have been observed and where gang-on-gang violence frequently occurs.

The investigation revealed that Diaz and Hercules each separately and unlawfully entered the United States in 2014 as unaccompanied minors. Both Diaz and Hercules were charged federally for being aliens in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Hercules previously pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 13 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Hercules will also be subject to deportation proceedings after the completion of his sentence.

Chelsea Gang Leader Sentenced to Over 15 years in Prison

A leader of the East Side Money Gang (ESMG) was sentenced last week in federal court in Boston on racketeering, drug trafficking and firearms trafficking charges.

Angel “Stackz” Mejia Zelaya, 24, of Chelsea, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Richard G. Stearns to 188 months in prison and five years of supervised release. In January 2019, Mejia pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, commonly known as RICO, one count of conspiracy to distribute cocaine and cocaine base, and one count of engaging in the business of dealing in firearms without a license.

Mejia was a leader in the ESMG, a violent, Chelsea-based street gang, which was responsible for various violent crimes, including multiple shootings, and drug distribution in Chelsea and surrounding communities. Mejia, as well as other members and associates of the gang, were also actively involved in illegally selling firearms, including handguns and shotguns, in and around Chelsea.

Mejia participated in multiple, gang-related shootings.

On July 5, 2015, Mejia was involved in a shooting targeting a rival gang member on a public street in Chelsea, which did not result in the rival gang member being injured. On March 29, 2016, Mejia and his lieutenant, Josue “Superbad” Rodriguez, agreed to provide a .22 caliber revolver to a third ESMG member, Brandon “Big Baby” Baez, so that Baez could “spank” with it – meaning that he could use it against rivals of ESMG. On April 3, 2016, in Revere, Baez used the revolver to attempt to murder two men believed to be members/associates of a rival gang as they sat in a vehicle. Both men were wounded, but not killed. Baez called Mejia immediately after the shooting to inform Mejia that Baez had just shot two men. Mejia further admitted to supplying other ESMG gang members with firearms, including a juvenile who then accidently shot another person.

While Mejia was the leader of the ESMG, the gang dealt substantial quantities of drugs, including cocaine and cocaine base (crack), in Chelsea and surrounding communities. Mejia was responsible for the distribution of at least a kilogram of cocaine base. Mejia and his gang subordinates stored drugs at and distributed drugs from a residence on Tudor Street in Chelsea and another residence in the Chelsea area. The gang kept handguns at both locations to protect their drug operations, as well as for other gang activities.

The prosecution of Mejia arose out of an investigation of various street gangs, including the 18th Street Gang, ESMG and the Boylston Street Gang, which were responsible for fueling a gun and drug pipeline across a number of cities and towns in eastern Massachusetts. During the course of the investigation, more than 70 firearms were seized.

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Ambrosino, Walsh Wary of 4 A.M. Encore Liquor License

Everett might be all-in on the 4 a.m. extending liquor license for Encore Boston Harbor, but surrounding cities like Chelsea aren’t so excited.

In comments this week, Boston Mayor Martin Walsh and Chelsea City Manager Tom Ambrosino said they weren’t in favor of Encore’s request for a limited 4 a.m. liquor license from the Massachusetts Gaming Commission (MGC). The request is currently under review and in a public comment period. It would only apply to those actively engaged in gaming, and the last call would be 3:30 a.m. Most other liquor licenses have a 2 a.m. cutoff.

Chelsea City Manager Tom Ambrosino said he doesn’t support the idea, seeing no advantage to Chelsea in having a luxury casino open late just a few hundred yards from the Chelsea city line.

“That would have no positive benefit to the City of Chelsea, so it would not be something I would favor,” he said.

Mayor Martin Walsh agreed with those sentiments as well.

“When the Legislature wrote the bill to have casino gaming, it was a 2 a.m. liquor license, which I voted on,” said Mayor Walsh. “I think that at this point in time, we should get the casino open, and see how the 2 a.m. license works. If there is a need, if there is a desire, or if there is a concern that it hampers the business, then I think we should explore the opportunity of maybe going until 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. But right now, at opening, closing at 2 a.m. – let’s see what it looks like. You can’t say there are concerns there until it’s open. I would request we wait and then have a full vetting. Right now it needs to be opened and see how it all works with a 2 a.m. closing.”

Meanwhile, Everett Mayor Carlo DeMaria said the later closing hour is critical to the casino being an international destination, as no such 2 a.m. rules apply in other locales where Wynn Resorts operates.

“The City of Everett is committed to supporting the success of the Encore Boston Harbor Resort,” he said. “In order for it to be a destination for an international clientele, the resort needs to be able to offer these clients a cocktail during the time they play. At 2 a.m., all the bars and restaurants will be closed, and drinks will only be served to those on the casino floor by a trained and certified server. Over-serving and irresponsible behavior will not be tolerated.”

He added that State Police, Everett Police and Encore security would be on site during the late hours and transportation services would be available for guests.

Walsh said he realizes that the Springfield casino already has a 4 a.m. license, but he also added that the circumstances are different in Everett. He said there are a lot of other cities and towns in the immediate area without such licenses. He said there has to be a dialog with everyone after the first six months.

“I’m not going to assume they’ll do 4 a.m.,” he said. “I’ll ask the Gaming Commission to be respectful of the surrounding cities and towns and see how the process works and see how the casino does in its first six months. Then we’ll revisit it and have a conversation and dialog at this point.

“We filed legislation (in Boston) a few years ago to open some of the bars and clubs later,” he continued. “So, that’s why I think you need a six-month vetting. Let’s assume for a moment the Gaming Commission grants the 4 a.m. license, that puts a lot of businesses in surrounding cities and town, including Boston, at a serious disadvantage. I think let’s wait and see what the 2 a.m. does…It’s not simply opening the casino until 4 a.m. It’s about having a conversation about other cities and towns and their licenses and what would happen in their establishments.”

The MGC is expected to talk more about the 4 a.m. license application at its next meeting on May 22.

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City Budget Request Submitted and Sits at $181.5 Million

City Manager Thomas Ambrosino presented a city budget just short of $181,500,000 for Fiscal Year 2020 to the City Council Monday night.

The proposed budget funds city expenditures at $86,095,981 and the schools at $95,391,784 for a total budget of $181,487,765. This budget is about $6.5 million more than the FY19 budget, an increase of 3.71 percent.

“The FY20 budget continues support for many programs we have implemented over the past few years,” Ambrosino stated in a letter to the City Council.

The City Manager is proposing full funding for social services programs in the downtown, including the Navigators and Youth Navigator program. The Health and Human Services budget also includes a new social services contract to support the ISD housing program.

The budget does include new positions in three city departments — E-911, DPW, and Elder Services — and an increase from a part-time to a full-time position in the Licensing Department. The E-911 increase, a total of three new full-time positions, follows a personnel review by the department’s new director.

Increases in the DPW include personnel for a new 311 system as well as a group of new hires required for the city to operate its own Water and Sewer Department.

The FY20 budget includes funds in salary reserve to cover the anticipated costs of ongoing union negotiations with City Hall employees. With the exception of the police and fire union contracts, all municipal union contracts expire on June 30 of this year.

•In other business, the Council approved an order proposed by councillors Giovanni Recupero, Enio Lopez, Luis Tejada, and Damali Vidot requiring that all street cleanings should be limited to the same amount of time in every street. Lopez and Recupero both noted that residents who live in areas where they have to move their cars for five hours for street cleaning face greater hardship than those where street cleaning is limited to two hours.

•The council also held a public hearing on zoning amendments that will allow for outdoor dining and improved signage and facades in the city.

Several local business owners and city officials spoke in support of the zoning amendments, noting it would improve the look of the downtown and make for a livelier, safer city.

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Chelsea Fatal Fire Determined to Be Caused by Electrical Problems

Chelsea Fire Chief Leonard A. Albanese Jr., Chelsea Police Chief Brian Kyes, State Fire Marshal Peter J. Ostroskey and Suffolk District Attorney Rachel Rollins announced the cause of the May 3 fire at 48 Watts St., a 2-family home in Chelsea, was electrical.

A quick-moving fire on Watts and Highland Streets last Friday, May 3, claimed the life of one 37-year-old man and caused extensive damage. Investigators said there were major problems with smoke detectors in the home and first-responders reported not hearing any alarms upon arrival.

The fire took the life of an adult man believed to be a relative of the occupants of 48 Watts St. The victim was identified as Milton Lopez, 37.

In the dense neighborhood, the fire spread to rear of 107-109 Highland Street.

The fire originated in a void space above the suspended ceiling of an enclosed porch. Investigators determined that an electrical event took place in the area of origin where there were numerous electrical circuits. Just before the fire was discovered, residents reported that the lights in the first floor kitchen, the room next to the porch, went off. The victim was found on the enclosed porch.

Chelsea fire investigators, Chelsea detectives, and State Police assigned to both the Office of the State Fire Marshal and to the Office of Suffolk District Attorney Rachel Rollins jointly investigated this fire. The Chelsea Inspectional Services Department, State Police Crime Scene Services and the Department of Fire Services’ Code Compliance Unit provided assistance.

The home had a mixture of working, missing and disconnected smoke alarms, carbon monoxide alarms and heat detectors. All of the alarms found in the home, whether they were disconnected, lying on a shelf, or actually functional, had expired and were more than 10 years old. First-arriving firefighters report not hearing any alarms sounding.

State Fire Marshal Ostroskey said, “May is Electrical Safety Month and electrical fires are the second leading cause of fire deaths in Massachusetts behind smoking. It’s important to have a licensed electrician check out your system every ten years to prevent problems.”

For more information on electrical fire safety go to: https://www.mass.gov/service-details/electrical-fire-safety.

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Summer Youth Job Lottery Takes Place at City Hall

City Manager Tom Ambrosino and members of the Chelsea Collaborative held a lottery on April 4 to pick the names of scores of young residents who will secure a summer youth employment job.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino picks names for the summer jobs lottery.

Director Gladys Vega said that while it was a time to celebrate the employment of more than 100 youth in the community, the need was far greater than the jobs.

“This year we received more than 300 applications, with more that came after the deadline,” she said. “Due to our funding, we are able to offer only 150 spots this year. We are excited to pair youth with more than 40 of our longstanding partners, including City of Chelsea, Chelsea Police, Intergenerational Literacy Program, Jordan Boys & Girls Club, North Suffolk Mental Health and others.”

At the lottery, 185 names in several different age groups were selected.

Some were put on a waiting list, and a vast majority of those applying were of a younger age.

Youth that were picked in the lottery are now going through several interviews this week, during School Spring Break. If they successfully pass those interviews, they will meet their employers in June and receive more training.

The Summer Youth Employment Initiative (SYEI) begins on July 1.

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License Commission Approves License for Carnival at Chelsea Commons

The carnival is coming to Chelsea.

On Wednesday, April 3, the Licensing Commission approved a four-day license for New Hampshire-based Fiesta Shows to hold a four-day carnival on the Chelsea Commons this spring.

During the short public hearing to approve the license, Chelsea Police Captain Keith Houghton said the City’s public safety agencies have never had an issue with Fiesta Shows. The company also runs events nearby in Revere and Lynn, among other communities.

At-Large City Councillor Roy Avellaneda said he’s had experience with Fiesta Shows owner John Flynn in the past, and that Flynn has always run a tight and secure ship with his shows. In addition, Avellaneda noted that Fiesta Shows will make a donation to the City’s summer jobs program.

Licensing Commissioner Roseann Bongiovanni said she did have some concerns about the carnival operating until 11 p.m., especially on Thursday night.

Flynn said while the license has the closing time at 11 p.m., festivities and rides typically wind down around 10 p.m., giving police time to sweep the area by 11 p.m. Music and amplification is usually shut down at 9 p.m., he added.

•In other business, the Commission denied a permit that would have allowed for Friday night social events at the Rincon Hondureno Function Hall at 194 Broadway. Commission members and City officials expressed concern that the social night would effectively turn the function hall into a nightclub.

•The Licensing Commission also approved a liquor license transfer for La Esquina Mariachi Restaurant at 170 Washington Ave., the former site of the Plaza Mexico restaurant.

The pastor and parishioners from the neighboring church expressed concerns about the new restaurant, given their experience in the past.

While the Commission approved the license, members asked that the owners are mindful of the past history at 170 Washington Ave.

“You need to be very conscious of the environment you are stepping into,” said Licensing Commission Chair Mark Rossi. “Please don’t disappoint us.”

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Top 100

Top 100

The City released the 2018 payroll figures for the City of Chelsea this week. The top earner was once again Chief Brian Kyes at $230,344, as per his recent contract. For the police earners, much of the gross salary listed also include detail pay, the vast majority of which does not come from City funds. Of the Top 10 highest paid, eight were from the Police or Fire Departments. City Manager Tom Ambrosino checked in at number 10, making $180,441.

NAME TITLE EARNINGS

Brian Kyes Chief of Police $230,344.33

Joseph Fern Sergeant $211,872.46

Thomas Dunn Captain Police Dept. $205,872.85

Waynen Ulwick Deputy Chief $203,288.67

Keith Houghton Captain Police Dept. $197,453.50

David Batchelor Captain Police Dept. $194678.46

John Quatieri Deputy Chief $183,497.21

Mary Bourque Superintendent 225 $182,148.98

Robert Houghton Deputy Chief $182,019.22

Thomas Ambrosino City Mgr. $180,441.72

Hector Gonzalez Sergeant $176,440.18

Michael Thompson Captain Fire Dept. $166,379.54

Michael Masucci Deputy Chief $166,189.31

Paul Giancola Deputy Chief $166,978.20

Edwin Nelson Lt. Police Dept. $164,488.50

Michael Addonizio Sergeant $162.911.18

Edward McGarry Deputy Chief $161,706.80

David Flibotte Sergeant $160,531.80

Rony Gobin Capt. Fire Dept. $158,983.82

John Noftle Sergeant $156,654.04

Robert Denning Capt. Fire Dept. $156,582.07

Leonard Albanese Fire Chief $156,436.80

Paul Doherty Capt. Fire Dept. $156,210.97

William Dana Capt. Police Dept. $155,886.74

Daniel Delaney Lt. Police Dept. $153,015.37

William Briquela Sergeant $151,980.26

Stephen Purcell Capt. Fire Dept. $151,220.30

Michael Gurska Capt. Fire Dept. $150,926.52

David Betz Lt. Police Dept. $149,452.67

Scott Conley Patrolman $148,971.14

William Krasco Patrolman $148,129.25

Thomas McLain Patrolman $147,994.81

Brian Dunn Lt. Police Dept. $146,432.04

Richard Wilcox Lt. Fire Dept. $146,159.30

Lyle Abell Patrolman $145,456.77

Robert Moschella Patrolman $144,743.05

Linda Breau Dep/Asst. Superintendent $144,048.58

Anthony D’Alba Sergeant $143,491.93

Richard Carroccino Capt. Fire Dept. $142,271.06

Robert Cameron Deputy Chief $141,745.95

Priti Johari Asst. Super 225 $141,549.97

Philip Rogers Capt. Fire Dept. $141,486.55

Nicole McLaughlin Patrolman $138,758.46

Gerald McCue Director Exempt $138,498.37

Jacqueline Maloney Principal 220 $138,370.05

Michael Lee Capt. Fire Dept. $137,816.45

David Rizzuto Lt. Police Dept. $135,789.24

Edward Keefe Deputy City Mgr. $134,355.42

Richard Perisie Deputy Chief $133,742.54

Jon Maldonado Patrolman $133,573.84

Angelica Guerra Patrolman $133,489.66

Adele Lubarsky Principal 220 $133,299.92

Philip Merritt Capt. Fire Dept. $133,167.89

Sarah Kent Asst. Super 220 $132,598.96

Randy Grajal Teacher $132,365.77

Anthony Tiro Lt. Fire Dept. $129,619.11

Cindy Rosenberg Director/SPED $129,238.46

John Bower Lt. Police Dept. $129,087.69

Michael Villanueva Patrolman $128,705.88

Michael Nee Sergeant $128,519.44

Ronald Schmidt Principal 220 $128,419.34

Stephen Garcia Patrolman $128,106.06

Joseph Capistran Patrolman $128,032.49

Garrison Daniel Patrolman $127,915.71

Linda Barber Asst. Principal $127,803.92

Gary Poulin Firefighter $127,245.49

Sylvia Vazquez Teacher $126,762.71

Joseph Stutto Patrolman $126,042.52

Mark Martineau Asst. Principal $125,942.86

David Bishop Lt. Fire Dept. $125,542.09

Michelle Martinello Principal 220 $125,500.04

Christian Lehmann Lt. Fire Dept. $125,163.61

Jose Torres Firefighter $124,622.98

Joanne O’Brien Patrolman $124,618.74

Michael Noone Patrolman $124,616.70

Richard Bellomo Patrolman $124,592.28

Michael Talbot Principal 200 $123,749.98

Mark Aliberti Lt. Fire Dept. $123,739.98

Augustus Casucci Patrolman $123,288.79

Cheryl Fisher City Solicitor $122,859.54

Adam Deleidi Principal 220 $122,500.04

Paul McCarthy Patrolman $121,779.06

Paul Marchese Patrolman $121,317.29

Star Chung Patrolman $121,169.07

Joseph Cooney Dir. Of Blgds/Grounds $121,153.88

Julie Shea Principal 220 $120,750.11

Nathaniel Meyers Principal 220 $120,500.05

Christopher Troisi Patrolman $120,363.74

Daniel Dejordy Lt. Fire Dept. $120,334.37

Long Lam Patrolman $118,106.45

Carlos Vega Patrolman $117,787.32

Joan Sullivan Director Exempt $117,584.55

Bertram Taverna Dir. Of Public Works $117,344.83

Juan Sanchez Patrolman $117,235.48

Alan Beausoleil Coordinator $116,774.31

John Coen Sergeant $116,114.05

David Batchelor Patrolman $116,023.49

Robert Brown Capt. Fire Dept. $115,978.37 Damon Peykar Coordinator $115,667.73

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Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

Accountability and Closure in Fatal Shooting of Pablo Villeda

A Lynn teen, who was originally from Chelsea, pleaded guilty March 7 as his trial was set to begin on charges that he opened fire during a party three years ago, killing 19-year-old Pablo Villeda and injuring six others.

Emanuel Marrero, 19, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in connection with Pablo Villeda’s March 6, 2016, shooting death, as well as six counts of armed assault with intent to murder and related charges for injuries suffered by six other young people.

Pablo Villeda was killed in an early morning teen party on March 6, 2016 held at a vacant apartment on Washington Avenue. On Thursday, March 7, Emanuel Marrero pleaded guilty in court to his murder.

Judge Linda Giles imposed the mandatory sentence of life in prison, ordering that he be eligible for parole after 15 years and that his sentences on the non-fatal shootings be served concurrently. Had he chosen to go to trial, the defendant – who was 16 at the time of the homicide – would have faced a first-degree murder charge.

“We accepted this plea because it delivers a significant measure of accountability for the defendant’s actions, which took Pablo’s life just as it was ready to begin,” District Attorney Rachael Rollins said. “It also considers all the potential outcomes at trial and on appeal, as well as the defendant’s age at the time of the homicide. Nothing we do can bring Pablo Villeda back to his loving family, but I hope this final result can at least provide them with closure to this tragic event.”

Chief Brian Kyes said he hopes the prison sentence will bring closure to the family on what was a tragic night in Chelsea three years ago.

“This was certainly a tragic night for everyone involved and one that none of us will soon forget,” said Kyes. “We truly hope that the imposition of this prison sentence by the Suffolk County Superior Court will bring some sense of solace to the family of Pablo Villeda that they absolutely deserve. Senseless acts of violence like this have no place in our neighborhoods and we will continue to work with our community partners to prevent tragedies like this from ever occurring again.”

Chelsea Police responded to 120 Washington Ave. in the early morning hours of March 6, 2016, for multiple calls reporting a disturbance at a party held inside a vacant apartment. They arrived to find seven people, ranging in age from 15 to 22, suffering gunshot wounds. Pablo was rushed to the hospital but succumbed to his injuries; the surviving victims were treated at Whidden Memorial Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Assistant District Attorney Julie Higgins of the DA’s Homicide Unit was prepared to introduce evidence and testimony showing that the defendant brought a .40 caliber handgun to the party, flaunting it to several other attendees. At some point, the evidence would have shown, the defendant confronted the victim and opened fire. Pablo was mortally wounded and six other people were struck, and fortunately survived their injuries. The defendant fled the scene but was identified in the course of an exhaustive investigation by Chelsea Police detectives and the Suffolk County State Police Detective Unit. The defendant was represented by attorney Richard Chambers

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Police Briefs 02-28-2019

Police Briefs 02-28-2019

By Seth Daniel & Paul Koolloian

Blocking the Way

On Feb. 11, at 10:05 a.m., an officer on foot patrol in Bellingham Square observed a group blocking the foot traffic in front of 427 Broadway – forcing a family with a small child to walk onto the street. One male became agitated at the officer’s request to move and became load and disorderly while refusing to move. The officer with the assistance of other officers placed the male into custody after a brief struggle.

Michael Catino, 35, of East Boston, was charged with assault, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Crack Cocaine Bust

On Feb. 12 the Chelsea Police executed a search warrant at 90 Chestnut St. #3. The search warrant was the result of an investigation into a male subject for the distribution of crack cocaine from that address. During the course of the investigation, the CPD purchased narcotics from the address. The male subject was placed into custody.

John Venete, 33, of 90 Chestnut St., was charged with possession to distribute cocaine.

Squattin’ in the Cellar

On Feb. 15, officers were dispatched to 26-28 Spencer Ave. for the report of two unwanted individuals. The officers spoke to the landlord who led them to the basement of the property. Officer’s located two males in the basement. Next to the men was a handful of needles and drug paraphilia. One male was found to have illegal pills on his person. Both were arrested.

Jeff Bosquet, 36, of Everett; and Stephen Morgan, 30, of 55 Heard St., were both charged with trespassing and possession of a Class C drug.

Broke into Van

On Feb. 16, at 2:45 a.m., officers were on patrol in the area of the Bellingham Street Bridge by the Silver Line Overpass when they observed a motor vehicle in the middle of the road with its lights off, parked next to a van. As the officers approached the vehicle, two males and a female known to the officers exited the vehicle. The car had a broken rear window. The officers made contact with the owner who responded and told officers the window had no damage when he parked the car earlier. The victim also told officers that tools were also missing from the car. All three were placed under arrest.

Jeff Bosquet, 36, of Everett; David Kerns, 43, of Revere; and Jaclyn Doucette, 29, of Revere; were all charged with breaking and entering in the night for a felony and larceny/receiving stolen property under $1,200.

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