Lynn Man Arrested in Assault of Chelsea Waitress

Lynn Man Arrested in Assault of Chelsea Waitress

Chief Brian Kyes announced late last week the arrest in Maryland of Gerardo Reyes Menjivar, 36, of Lynn, who was wanted in connection with the stabbing of a waitress at a Chelsea Restaurant on Monday night, May 7.

Menjivar was placed in custody in Beltsville, MD, May 10 by the Capital Area Regional Fugitive Task Force.

Chelsea Police Detectives placed a Nationwide BOLO for Menjivar and the vehicle he was operating on Tuesday, May 8. Investigators worked tirelessly in their efforts to track Menjivar’s movements over 24 hours, and those efforts led to the arrest.

Chief Kyes praised his officers, the community members who came forward with information and a host of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies that coordinated together to bring Menjivar into custody.

“Today after a successful nationwide law enforcement effort we placed a violent individual into custody and our community is safer,” he said. “I thank the many agencies involved that worked in unison with our department to apprehend Menjivar.”

Menjivar will be held in Maryland as a fugitive from justice as the Suffolk Court District Attorney’s Office work on his rendition back to Massachusetts.

Menjivar will face multiple charges including Assault to Murder.

The following agencies were instrumental in the investigation:  The Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office, the Massachusetts State Police Violent Fugitive Apprehension Section, Boston PD Detectives, Denver CO PD, the Bennet CO Sheriff’s Office, NYPD, US Marshals Service, the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, and  the regional HIDA (High Intensity Drug Apprehension) Taskforce.

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Ambrosino Submits $174 Million City Budget

Ambrosino Submits $174 Million City Budget

With a proposal that increases spending by nearly $10 million, City Manager Tom Ambrosino submitted a City Budget to the Council this week for consideration at the May 7 meeting.

The $174 million budget is rather lean and creates only two new positions, but does contribute extra money to the School Department and covers the final year pay increases of several union contracts.

As submitted, the budget is out of balance by $790,000 – which Ambrosino said would not be a big deal to cover in the months ahead.

“We continue our improvements in the downtown and our support for the schools,” he said. “We have created two new positions in the DPW, one in the Water Department and a Junior Engineer.”

There are no new positions for Police and Fire this year, in contrast to the last two years when record numbers were added to the Fire Department through federal and local funding.

“There are not new positions in those departments this year,” he said. “We’ll maintain the current contingents.”

There are now 111 Police officers on, and just shy of 100 firefighters.

Other fixed costs included increases in health insurance, rubbish disposal/collection, and retirement system funding.

The two new positions relate to growth and water meters, he said.

The junior engineer will help the city with all of the ongoing projects, while the Water Department employee will be a liaison to the public regarding the many issues with the City’s current water meters.

Ambrosino said he has instructed the Department to begin the process of getting new water meters, but until then, the new employee would help sort out customer complaints.

“The City is looking into new water meters because our existing meters are old and not functioning well,” he said.

For the School Department, he said they gave an additional $1 million on top of the $1 million added last year. He said they have given the schools 5 percent more than required by the state this year.

However, he said that cannot continue forever.

“There is a balancing act in how much a City can contribute to the School Department without putting its own budget out of whack,” he said.

The School Department is primarily funded by state money, and the City is required to pay a certain portion of the funding as well through a state formula. This year, that mandatory payment is going to be $91.2 million. The City has given over and above that in the last three years.

Following their receipt of the City Budget on Monday, Council President Damali Vidot will schedule a full slate of budget hearings for the month of May and June. The City Budget must get Council approval by June 30.

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Students Stage Walk-Out at Chelsea High to Highlight School Safety

Students Stage Walk-Out at Chelsea High to Highlight School Safety

More than 500 Chelsea High students walked out of class on Thursday, March 15, as part of the national school walk-out movement to promote more efforts towards school safety.ChelseaRecord

Armed with only a megaphone, students marched into shin-deep snow and cold temperatures to participate in the movement locally, and to draw attention to school safety.

They were supported by the Chelsea Public Schools and the Chelsea Police, who stood in solidarity with the students, who ranged in age from 13 to 18.

“P-O-W-E-R,” yelled Stephanie Rodrigues, one of the key coordinators along with Diego Estrada. “We have the power. We have a voice. We can use our power…We deserve to be heard. We deserve to be safe. We don’t deserve to stand around and wait for someone to come kill us. You could be next. Unfortunately, the 17 students in Florida were killed by a man who should not have had a gun. This is not normal. We should not stand around and wait for someone to take action for us. We can take action.”

Student Eric Lazo entertained the crowd with impromptu chants and songs on the megaphone, for which most everyone in the crowd followed.

“I came out because this can’t happen again,” said Imane Rharbi. “We can’t have students being killed and unsafe. We need gun control right now. That’s why I came out.”

Junior Angel Vargas said he and many other students are concerned that they could be next, that the fear of something at Chelsea High is real.

“It’s important for all of us to come out here,” he said. “It was terrible what happened in Florida. That was the reason I came out. We are scared.”

Students cheered loudly, hats and scarves wrapped tightly around them, and then broke into a solemn moment as Rodrigues read the names of the 17 students killed in Florida on Feb. 14.

The national walk-out day was supposed to occur on March 14, and all over the state and country students staged walk-outs to call for more gun ownership restrictions and more funding for mental health services inside and outside of school. In Chelsea, the effort had to be postponed because of the blizzard on March 13 that cancelled school for two days.

Originally, the plan called for Chelsea students to have their walk-out in the school gym to avoid having to go in the snow. However, Rodrigues said she and Estrada were approached by students who said it should go on outside.

“We were approached by some students who felt we shouldn’t be focused on comfort by going in the gym,” said Rodrigues, who described herself as just another student and a track athlete. “We agreed. We shouldn’t be comfortable when making a stand. We wanted to show we were standing up no matter what the conditions were outside.”

Outside on Thursday, students carried signs that made many different statements.

Some depicted an anti-gun message, while others called for funding to help people who are mentally ill. Some signs blasted the National Rifle Association (NRA) and others called for remembrance of the Florida students.

Most striking, however, were the hand-made signs that read, “Am I Next?”

Rodrigues said it isn’t an overreaction in Chelsea.

She said students and adults are concerned about their safety in school, and it’s something that is a bit new.

“Honestly, I feel we are all scared, even the adults,” she said. “That’s what pulled us all together. We shouldn’t let our safety in school be in question. That brought us together…One day it could be us.”

Cutlines –

FRONT –

Stephany Villatoro and Masireh Ceesay were two of about 500 Chelsea High students that participated in a walk-out for school safety on Thursday, March 15. Students said they came together because they were scared that one day they could be school shooting victims.

2017 –

Nancy Baguada and Mauricio Rubi march through the snow to the walk-out.

2051 –

Co-Organizer Stephanie Rodrigues fires up the student crowd at the Stadium with a megaphone.

2067 –

Student Erik Lazo shouted out interesting chants and songs during the walk-out to get the crowd fired up.

2083 –

Imane Rharbi said there can be no more school shootings. She said now is the time for stricter gun control.

2097 –

Students rally on the Stadium field in the snow.

2012 –

Junior Angel Vargas signs the petition from Chelsea High.

2104 –

Student organizers standing with Chelsea Police Officers. Chelsea Police and Chelsea High security provided a safe perimeter for the students during the walk-out.

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Police Briefs 03-22-2018

Police Briefs 03-22-2018

BUS MISHAP

On Monday, March 19, at 12:50 p.m., Chelsea Fire and Police responded to the intersection of Broadway and Eleanor Street after being alerted by Fire Capt. Richard Perisie of a motor vehicle accident. Capt. Perisie ordered a Box Alarm assignment that was immediately transmitted by Fire Alarm. Upon arrival fire crews from E3, E2, L2 and T1 under the command of Deputy Paul Giancola immediately began patient assessments and mitigated any hazardous fluid leaks.

Three parties were transported by Cataldo EMS to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Transit Police responded to the scene and took control of the incident.

The cause of the accident is under investigation.

MAN FOLLOWS GIRL, ASSAULTS OFFICER

On Wednesday, March 7, at 2:18 p.m., Officers responded to a report of a frightened juvenile who reported that a male on Marlborough Street was following her. Officers observed a man fitting the description and attempting to talk to him. The subject became defensive and began yelling; he was then placed into custody for assaulting an officer.

Robert Daniels, 19, of 73A Marlborough St., was charged with disorderly conduct, assault and battery and assault and battery on a police officer.

TOOK A NUTTY

On March 8, at 9:45 p.m., officers were dispatched to the area of 89 Sixth St. on a report of a motor vehicle collision with unknown injuries. Upon arrival, officers observed a female directing them to two men engaged in a struggle on the ground, one of the men being her husband. The female stated her husband saw the other male causing damage with a knife to their car.

As officers separated the two, the subject assaulted two police officers and kicked an EMT who responded to render aid. The individual also made verbal threats to the victim. He was placed under arrest after a brief struggle.

Walter Perez, 27, of 128 Williams St., was charged with mayhem, assault and battery, assault and battery on a police officer, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, intimidating a witness, and assault and battery on ambulance personnel.

JUVENILE ASSULTED WITH BUTANE

On March y, a CPD officer placed a juvenile under arrest for assaulting another youth with a butane lighter during school.

The 17-year-old Chelsea youth was arrested on Guam Road and charged with assault and battery by a dangerous weapon, intimidating a witness, disturbing school and threatening to commit a crime.

DRUG DISTRIBUTION

On March 9, at 5 p.m., members of the Chelsea Police Drug Unit were on surveillance in the area of 150 Franklin St. when they observed a silver Mercedes pull up about 20 feet in front of their unmarked cruiser. They then watched a drug transaction in front of them and placed both under arrest.

Justin Jensen, 43, of 150 Franklin Ave., was charged with distribution of a Class B drug, conspiracy, and possession of a Class B drug.

James Femino, 61, of Revere, was charged with distribution of a Class B drug and conspiracy.

MS-13 MEMBER GUILTY

A member of MS-13’s Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha (ECS) clique in Chelsea, was sentenced March 12 in federal court in Boston for racketeering conspiracy.

Domingo Tizol, a/k/a “Chapin,” 23, a Guatemalan national who resided in Chelsea, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV to 10 years in prison and three years of supervised release. Tizol will be subject to deportation upon completion of his sentence.

On May 26, 2015, Tizol and another MS-13 member Bryan Galicia-Barillas, a/k/a “Chucky,” attacked a suspected gang rival on Bellingham Street in Chelsea.  Tizol punched and hit the victim while Barillas stabbed the victim multiple times.  The victim survived the attack but suffered life-threatening injuries.

Tizol and Barillas were two of 61 defendants indicted in a superseding indictment targeting the criminal activities of alleged leaders, members, and associates of MS-13 in Massachusetts. Barillas previously pleaded guilty and is awaiting sentencing.

Police Log

Wednesday, 3/7

Joser Valentin, 49, 63 Highland Ave., Malden was arrested on a warrant.

Robert Daniels, 19, 73A Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for disorderly conduct, assault and battery on a police officer and assault and battery.

Andrew Babigumira, 32, 62 Garden Circle, Waltham, was arrested for trespassing.

Thursday, 3/8

Walter Perez, 27, 128 Williams St., Chelsea, was arrested for malicious damage to motor vehicle, assault and battery, mayhem, assault and battery on a police officer, assault and batter with a dangerous weapon, witness intimidation and assault and battery on a ambulance personnel.

Friday, 3/9

Juvenile offender, 17, Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, witness intimidation, school disturbance and threat to commit crime.

Michael Bernard, 39, 15 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Gilberto Vasquez, 48, 855 Broadway, Chelsea, was arrested for operation of motor vehicle with suspended license.

Justin Jensen, 43, 150 Franklin Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for distribution of Class B drug, conspiracy to violate drug law and possessing Class B drug.

James Femino, 61, 371 Northshore Rd., Revere, was arrested for possessing Class B drug and conspiracy to violate drug law.

David Panameno, 42, 227 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the Influence of liquor.

Saturday, 3/10

Shawn Hilaire, 27, 307 Broadway, Fall River, MA, was arrested on a warrant.

Kyle Rego, 26, 186 Valentine St., Fall River, MA 02720 was arrested on a warrant.

Mario Galindo, 36, 94 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the Influence of Liquor, and operation of motor vehicle unlicensed.

Josmar Falcao-Ferreira, 57, 90 Bacon St., Waltham, was arrested for operation of motor vehicle unlicensed, stop sign violation and warrant.

Sunday, 3/11

Juvenile offender, 17, Revere, was arrested for shoplifting.

Yunis Aden, 24, 9 Guam Rd., Chelsea, was arrested for shoplifting, assault and battery on a police officer, resisting arrest and dangerous weapon.

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Councillor Punts on Residency Ordinance, Sent to Committee

Councillor Punts on Residency Ordinance, Sent to Committee

Just when it appeared that Councillor Giovanni Recupero might finally get a version of his long-sought-after residency ordinance passed on Monday, the votes quickly disappeared – causing him to have to pull the measure before the vote and send it to a Committee on Conference.

“Why are these councillors so opposed to it?” he asked. “Everett has it. Boston has it. Revere has it. Everyone has it, but we don’t because some councilors say we’re wasting our energy and wasting our money. In the end, the people want this. Everett is 2.4 sq. miles and they have it. That’s only a little bigger than we are. If it’s good enough for me to live here, it should be good enough for the police…It’s good enough for these councilors to ask for the people’s vote and say they will represent the people, but then they do this and don’t represent the people right. I speak to my constituents all the time. This is what the constituents want.”

Recupero had ordered two weeks ago that the City Solicitor’s Office draft a residency ordinance that would go into effect on April 1 and would be for only new hires of the Police and Fire Departments. Any new hire would have to live in Chelsea for five years after being hired. Currently, any new police officer or firefighter gets preference in hiring if they’ve lived in Chelsea one year before applying.

There is, however, no residency requirement.

Recupero has been pushing some form of a residency requirement for about four or five years. On Monday, he seemed to be at the brink of getting something passed.

With only eight councilors in attendance, the votes seemed like they might line up. However, as discussion went on, he lost some key votes and was going to only end up with three or four in the affirmative.

That’s when he decided to pull his request for a roll call and send the matter to a Committee on Conference.

Part of the problem was that many were confused by what the new ordinance would cost – as it would require the City Manager to collective bargain the new provision with the Police and Fire Unions. That would mean to get the new work condition – meaning the residency requirement for new hires – exisiting police and fire would have to be paid more money contractually.

“I think the situation deserves a little more attention and discussion,” said Councillor Luis Tejada, who has supported the idea in the past.

Councillor Calvin Brown, who filled in as Council president on Monday due to President Damali Vidot being ill, spoke on the matter and said he couldn’t support it.

“I don’t think I’m ready to vote on this or have enough information from the unions,” he said.

Councillor Judith Garcia said she believed that focusing energy and money on residency was a waste of time.

“If our main focus is to have some of our own in the Police Department and Fire Department, the we should focus our attention on recruitment,” she said.

The matter was sent to a Committee on Conference.

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School, City Officials Ask Parents to Be Aware of Children’s Social Media Posting Following Threat

School, City Officials Ask Parents to Be Aware of Children’s Social Media Posting Following Threat

In the wake of a social media threat against the Chelsea High School posted last Friday, School Supt. Mary Bourque is putting students and parents on notice that there will be zero tolerance for any threats – whether verbal, written or posted on social media.

As a major footnote to that warning, she said she is initiating a citywide campaign aimed at parents of school-age children – calling them to be vigilant about checking their children’s’ social media posts.

“Any threats, whether verbal, written or posted on social media we will prosecute and we have prosecuted with our relationship with the Chelsea Police,” she said. “As a practice, the Chelsea Public Schools always talks serious threats to the schools and well-being of the schools. There are protocols we have with the Chelsea Police about prosecuting these matters. We will have zero tolerance for any threats.”

This follows on a threat made on Friday, March 2, via a social media post by a student at the high school. Using the protocol – and especially in the current environment following the school shooting in Florida – police quickly checked out the threat, searched  the student’s home and determined it wasn’t credible.

But that didn’t get the student off the hook.

Police, according to protocol, placed the juvenile student under arrest for posting a threat via social media.

It won’t be the last time either, Bourque said.

And that got to the heart of the matter for the schools, and that heart is the schools want parents to really monitor their children’s’ social media accounts.

“We need help with this, as does every school  district,” she said. “We also want to work with parents to start monitoring what their Chelsea are doing on social media. For us, it’s getting control of what’s going on in social media that’s of paramount importance…We need parents to be paying attention to all of the accounts. No child should have a password their parents don’t know about.”

City Manager Tom Ambrosino and members of the City Council have also been asked to help with the campaign, and will do so.

“There has to be a zero tolerance for this,” he said. “Kids can’t be posting these kinds of things on social media. They will get in trouble for it. There are just too many serious things going on with this to be making these kinds of threatening posts.”

Bourque said there have been no credible threats discovered from the posts that have happened  this year, including the one on Friday.

Most of the time, she said, it’s about posturing, but it’s a posture that’s going to land kids in serious trouble.

“It’s mostly students trying to portray themselves as something they are not,” she said. “They are bad judgment calls in putting themselves out there in that way, but it’s something that will get them in trouble.”

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Council Calls for Ordinance to Be Drafted on Residency Restriction

Council Calls for Ordinance to Be Drafted on Residency Restriction

The Chelsea City Council voted 9-1 on Monday night to call for City Solicitor Cheryl Fisher Watson to draw up a new ordinance requiring a five-year residency period for all new police and fire hires.

The controversial move was brought for the umpteenth time by Councillor Giovanni Recupero at Monday’s Council meeting, and it had been highly anticipated by the membership for several weeks.

Recupero’s plan calls for any new hire of the Police Department or Fire Department to live within the city for five years after being hired.

Currently, there are no such restrictions, but Recupero has been on a mission for more than five years to get something drafted and passed.

His order on Monday simply called for the Solicitor to draft up an ordinance and have it ready for Council consideration by the next meeting.

“For many, many years I’ve been trying to have people who work here live here,” he said. “Other cities do this. We should too. The residents like us love our city. It’s not to say they don’t love the City, but there’s a little extra care when you live here…Life is not what you want. Life is what it is. If you want to work here, you live here.”

Many had been interested to see what new Councillor Bob Bishop might think of the matter, as it was the first time it had been before him. And he made himself quite clear that he supports residency.

“I’m very upset on payday in Chelsea because three-fourths of our paychecks go to Saugus or Lynnfield. We don’t get an economic bang for that buck because that money of ours isn’t circulating in Chelsea. If you’re hired in Chelsea as a firefighter or police officer and you don’t want to live here, then don’t take the job. Someone else will. I think it’s a good thing to have police and fire live here.”

Councillor Roy Avellaneda was the lone lawmaker against the measure this time, and said he thinks the Council should focus on other things.

“I’d rather focus  my energy on making Chelsea a better place to live than a place to be forced to live,” he said.

Councillor Judith Garcia didn’t vote on the matter as she was absent.

Fisher Watson said there are concerns that any such ordinance would conflict with collective bargaining agreements, so she wasn’t sure she would be able to produce the new ordinance.

Recupero said that any such conflict does not exist and the ordinance can be written up and considered. He said after the Council passes the ordinance, it’s up to the City Manager to negotiate the collective bargaining to include the new requirement for new hires.

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Good Samaritans Help Injured Dog in Everett

Good Samaritans Help Injured Dog in Everett

Jamie-Lee Hersey, of Wakefield, was driving along Revere Beach Parkway at approximately 11 p.m. on Tuesday night when she came across a severely injured dog in the middle of the road alongside Simoniz Car Wash.  Instinctively, she immediately pulled over to help the dog, and was joined by another good Samaritan, Chris Desrochers, of Revere, who stopped to assist.

Together, Hersey and Desrochers barricaded the small dog between barrels at the car wash in order to shield it from further injury as they contacted the Everett Police Department.

Within minutes, Everett Animal Control Officer Stacia Gorgone was on scene to assist, despite being off duty at the time.  Gorgone described the scene as gruesome.

“The bottom half of his body was mutilated” she said about the small dog, and she suspected that he would need a leg amputation if he managed to survive.

A video reveals the dog was idle in the middle of the road, but the injuries are more consistent with a fall as opposed to being struck by a vehicle.  After the story circulated on social media,  Animal Control received an anonymous tip that someone had witnessed what they believed was a sweatshirt, thrown from a vehicle window at the same location within the same time range.  The Everett Police Department are currently investigating whether these injuries were a case of abuse or an unintentional accident.  Nobody has come forward to claim the dog as their own.

“It’s not clear if it’s intentional or an accident,” Gorgone explained, concerned after hearing the witness account.

While vets originally tried to save the dog’s leg, Gorgone shared the dog has since had his leg amputated, but is under great care.

“He is doing amazing,” she shared.  “He got his leg amputated as to not prolong suffering.”

The dog is currently under care with the DogMother LLC, a local holding facility for animals.  Due to high medical bills, a GoFundMe has been set up to alleviate expenses.  Already, over $9,000 has been accumulated, but volunteers are working relentlessly to raise more funding.

Since the incident, Hersey and Desrochers have already been in the process of adopting rescue dogs of their own.  Gorgone, who is an advocate for animal rescue, explained this is the silver lining to the injured pup’s story:  “Not only did they save this dog, but they were inspired to rescue other dogs, too.”

Donations can be made at https://www.gofundme.com/HelpJamiePup and anyone with further information about the indecent is encouraged to contact the Everett Police Department at 617-387-1212.

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No Warning:After Pit Bull Attack Killed Her Dog, Chelsea Woman Said There Were Few Places to Turn

No Warning:After Pit Bull Attack Killed Her Dog, Chelsea Woman Said There Were Few Places to Turn

By Seth Daniel

Chelsea resident Amy Schlegel’s dog, Fitzgerald, died after a vicious attack by an unleashed Pitbull on Lower Broadway Dec. 19. With her beloved family dog gone and facing $22,000 in vet bills, she said she learned there is very little recourse for victims of such attacks on public property. Now she’s hoping to change that before the dog park opens this spring.

Chelsea resident Amy Schlegel’s dog, Fitzgerald, died after a vicious attack by an unleashed Pitbull on Lower Broadway Dec. 19. With her beloved family dog gone and facing $22,000 in vet bills, she said she learned there is very little recourse for victims of such attacks on public property. Now she’s hoping to change that before the dog park opens this spring.

A routine dog-walking trip on the afternoon of Dec. 19 in the waterfront neighborhood has completely upended Amy Schlegel’s life – leaving her coping with the death of the family dog at the jaws of a loose Pitbull and trying to figure out how to pay more than $20,000 in vet bills.

It’s been a hard lesson, she told the Record, but it’s a lesson that she hopes can enlighten dog owners around the city – especially before the dog park opens on the corner of Broadway and Admiral’s Hill, which is ironically where she and her dog was attacked.

“Our backs were turned and there was no warning,” she said. “We passed the Pitbull and its owner on the sidewalk and something must have tipped it off. It came running after us at full speed and lit into my dog’s neck. I had absolutely no warning. It was a surprise attack. I didn’t see it coming because our backs were turned. It seemed like forever, but it was probably five minutes in total. My dog Fitzgerald is now gone and I have $22,000 in veterinarian bills and very little legal recourse or help. The key is that it was on public property and so there isn’t much anyone can do, I’m told.”

According to the police report, around 3 p.m., police were on patrol in the Lower Broadway area when they encountered two women screaming and a Pitbull attacking a Dachshund.

“The Pitbull was repeatedly biting and eating the skin of the smaller Dachshund dog as the Dachshund was laying helplessly on the sidewalk bleeding profusely with the Pitbull on top of him viciously and continuously biting him,” read the report.

Officers approached the scene and found Schlegel and the Pitbull’s owner trying to separate the dogs. Both women had injuries to their hands as the dog had bitten them too.

The officer quickly moved to shoot the Pitbull because it was clearly killing the Dachshund, but the owner of the Pitbull got in front of the officer and prevented him from shooting the dog. Even after he ordered her numerous times to move, she refused and her dog continued to rip at the innards of Fitzgerald. Finally, the officer pushed her out of the way and shot the Pitbull, stopping the attack. The Pitbull was rushed to Angell Animal Hospital, where it died later. Fitzgerald was rushed to another animal hospital, and after 11 days and many procedures, he died too.

“That additional time she stood there in front of the officer I’m convinced is what killed Fitzgerald,” she said. “The bites that happened to his stomach during that time are what really injured  him to where he  couldn’t recover.”

As horrible as the attack was, and the loss of her dog, it is the aftermath that has opened Schlegel’s eyes – and she now believes that the community needs to be starkly aware of what she is convinced will happen once the dog park opens.

Police follow up investigations yielded little cooperation from the other dog owner, and she never brought any information on the dog to police or answered her door – despite police indicating that they could observe her inside the apartment several times.

Nonetheless, Schlegel found that there are probably many, many more such attacks that go unreported or undocumented. She said when an attack happens on private property, insurance covers any losses. However, on public property, if the offending owner doesn’t cooperate, not much can happen.

“This is the kind of thing that could really change somebody’s life in an instant,” she said. “That dog park is going to be a nexus and I think attacks there are going to be inevitable. Something serious is going to happen there. It needs to be addressed beforehand. They say they’re going to have a big dog area and a small dog area, but I don’t know if people are going to abide by that. And how many people are going to volunteer information at the dog park that they own a vicious dog?”

Schlegel hopes that there might be a way to enhance the current laws to help police to initiate criminal charges against owners involved in attacks on public property. Right now, that is nearly impossible, she said.

Meanwhile, one idea she believes might help to bolster the cause is to start a record keeping system outside of the police. She said she would like to see the City create a dog attack hotline for statistical purposes.

She said she hopes it all points to some sort of reforms that Chelsea might be able to lead on.

“Bigger cities have tried things like bans and lost,” she said. “Chelsea is relatively small compared to Boston and you can get things done. There isn’t a lot of gridlock. Maybe this is a place where we can get something done that can be a model for other places. There is a huge hole here and it is attacks on public property. I’m hoping this will help the general public. It can change someone’s life forever. I’m a perfect example of that.”

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Coming to a TV Near You:Hollywood Hits Revere Beach for a New Pilot Program

Coming to a TV Near You:Hollywood Hits Revere Beach for a New Pilot Program

by Sue Woodcock

Film crews descended on Revere Beach Boulevard and Bill Ash’s Lounge at the end of last week. Crews were filming a television pilot for Showtime called, “City on the Hill” and a scene called “The Approval.”

Crews have also been filming in Malden. Star actor Kevin Bacon (Footloose) is tagged to be a part of the show although he was not in Revere.

The scenes are set in the late 1980s or early 90s and the show is supposed to be a “cop-type” drama.

The Department of Recreation and Conservation (DCR) closed down Revere Beach Boulevard from just before Shirley Avenue to Revere Street. One scene being shot was along the boulevard starting at the Bandstand and traveling down to the State Police Barracks. The shot, captured from a camera mounted to the top of a blacked out Porsche Cayenne (rented out for two days at $40,000, according to a crew member.) The scene being filmed showed an armored car truck being followed by a minivan.

All the vehicles being used are late 1980s and 90s models. There was an old Lincoln Continental, a Jeep Grand Wagoner with wood paneling and an old Volvo.

The outside of Bill Ash’s Lounge was transformed to the “Ebb-Tide” a restaurant/bar type of place. Last Wednesday afternoon about 20 electricians and crew members were inside the dive redoing all the lighting.

The crew was very tight-lipped about what they were working on and unknowing members of the public who just wanted to go for a walk, were redirected away from the filming areas.

No word on when the show will air.

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