Chelsea Cultural Council Grants to Support Art and Cultural Projects

Chelsea Cultural Council Grants to Support Art and Cultural Projects

Chelsea Cultural Council has received $21,900 from the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) a state agency, to assist public projects that promote access, education, diversity and excellence in the arts, humanities and sciences.

Council members will be available to discuss grant procedure and guidelines on Monday, September 24 from 2-6 p.m. in the lobby of the Williams Building, 180 Walnut Street.

Organizations, schools, individuals are encouraged to apply for grant funds that can be used to support a variety of artistic and cultural projects that benefit citizens in Chelsea – including field trips, exhibits, festivals, short-term arts residencies or performances in schools as well as cultural workshops and lectures.  Projects awarded must be implemented between January, 2019 and December 31, 2019.

The deadline for completed Online Application must be received by October 15, 2018.

Online Application is available at  www.mass-culture.org/chelsea.  Guidelines can be picked up at Chelsea City Hall, Dept. of Health & Human Services, Room 100 or find it at  www.chelseama.gov/ccc.  For additional information call (617) 466-4090 or email  culturalcouncil@chelseama.gov.

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New Clark Avenue School Opens with Buzz of Excitement on Wednesday

New Clark Avenue School Opens with Buzz of Excitement on Wednesday

It was a new year at the Clark Avenue Middle School Wednesday morning, Aug. 29.

But it wasn’t just any new year.

It was the year that students poured through a brand new front door to the clean, sparkling hallways of a brand new $54 million school building with all of the most modern amenities that their old school – the former 110-year-old Chelsea High School – couldn’t provide.

“I really want to see the new gym; I can’t wait,” said William Bay, a 7th grader, as he waited outside his new school Wednesday morning. “I guess I just want to see all of the school. I’m excited about the whole thing. I think it will help me do better in school. I’m going to learn more here.”

For parents, the excitement was just as frenzied.

“I’m so excited,” said Bernice Reyes, who brought her two sixth graders for their first day. “I have a college graduate who went to the old Clark Ave. I remember that school. It couldn’t give these kids what this one will.”

Said Sara El-Mahil, a returning student, “It’s better than the old one for sure. The classroom are larger and all the water fountains will work now. I really like the space in the front where kids can hang out before school. Everything is going to be more organized.”

The Clark Ave began several years ago, with Phase 1 concluding in December 2016 and kids being welcomed into the new classroom portion along Tudor Street. This year, however, the entire school was opened to students – revealing a new gym, new music rooms, the library and numerous other amenities that completed the project.

“It’s a fantastic building,” said Principal Michael Talbot. “The kids are going to love it. The teachers are going to love the new options that this building gives them to teach the kids. Everyone’s excited.”

Supt. Mary Bourque and other district officials, including Gerry McCue – who shepherded the project through before retiring this year, were on hand to welcome students and parents.

“I am so proud of what the City has done here with this facility,” she said. “This was the right thing to do for the kids and the community.”

One of the most appreciated things on Wednesday morning for the students, parents and staff was the new, sprawling courtyard and outdoor amphitheatre at the corner of Tudor  Street and Clark Avenue. The new space is still under construction, but was finished to the extent that it offered a great place to gather before school.

Previously, the school hugged the sidewalk, and there was little to no space for gathering.

The new outdoors space will support learning at the school, and will also be available for the community to use for things such as outdoor plays or movies.

Williams School sewer problems

The Williams School – home of the Browne Middle and Wright Middle Schools – experienced a heart-attack moment on Monday afternoon when a major sewer blockage threatened opening day.

Around 3 p.m. on Monday, the sewer backed up and caused a major problem in the school. All of the teachers getting prepared for the school year in the building were sent home.

Joe Cooney and his team at the Buildings and Grounds Department went to work on the problem and soon found that there was a huge cluster of baby wipes clogging the sewer pipe and drains.

“Joe’s team worked throughout the night washing and sanitizing everything and we were ready to be back in business Tuesday morning,” said Supt. Mary Bourque. “I am truly the luckiest and most grateful Superintendent for our dedicated and hard-working Buildings and Grounds department.”

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Beacham, Robin, and Dexter in Everett to Basically Shut Down through October

Beacham, Robin, and Dexter in Everett to Basically Shut Down through October

Facing a do-or-die situation for the completion of major off-site roadwork this summer, and a slower-than-expected work schedule on an Eversource project, Encore Boston Harbor and the City of Everett have announced on Tuesday the areas of Beacham, Dexter and Robin Streets will basically be closed off from Aug. 8 through October.

The change will likely have much more dire consequences for Chelsea than for Everett, as the roadway in and out of the New England Produce Center will be shut down for all intents and purposes. Beyond that, cab traffic from the airport will also be diverted away from the normal route through Beacham Street.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino said they’ll have to take a wait and see approach in the coming weeks to figure out the proper response.

“It’s just hard to say what the impact will be,” he said. “Given the Second Street alternative (for the Produce Center), I’m hoping the impact is not too substantial. But, we will have to wait and see.”

Chief Brian Kyes said the Police Department would employ its message boards around the city to inform people of the sudden change.

Many had hoped that the work could get done side-by-side, and by making the Eversource transmission line project and the Encore traffic project a dual project Ð it could bring down the pain associated with so much construction work in one small location.

However, that ended up not happening, said Everett Planner Jay Monti, who indicated that Eversource moved too slow on their project. That, in turn, has put things in jeopardy for the casino to get its work done before the end of the outdoor construction season Ð which closes in early November when the asphalt plants shut down.

“Due to delays in permitting and obstructions on the road, Eversource has gotten behind schedule to the point it’s going to threaten Encore in getting its [off-site] roadwork done and without that work they can’t open the casino next year. We’re up against a wall and the only way to get it to work is to go 24 hours a day and essentially shut down the roadsÉThings got critical last week and Eversource was just not making progress. Encore came to us and said they can’t wait any longer. They can’t risk not opening up the casino on time because of the Eversource project running behind.”

The shut-down began Aug. 8, and will run for about 10 weeks into October so that Eversource can work around the clock, three shifts, to get their work in the area done and move on to Chelsea and East Boston. Following that, the shutdown will allow Encore to work around the clock to get the work done that has been held up due to Eversource running behind.

Monti said the corridor will be open to pedestrians and bicycles during the 10-week shutdown.  To be clear, though, the roads will be open for drivers, but it will be more than difficult to get through at all hours of the day. So, they are suggesting people use other ways to get places like the airport, the Produce Center and other areas. “For all intents and purposes, it’s closed because anyone who goes down there will sit in traffic for three hours,” he said. “We want to send a message to people who use that corridor. If you’re a cabbie going to or coming from the airport, you have to take the Tobin and pay the toll. If you’re a delivery driver for Amazon, we don’t want you in that area because this work needs to get done. If you’re a driver for the Produce Center, we encourage you to take Rt. 16 and Second Street into Chelsea.”

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August Activities Posted at Local DCR Areas

August Activities Posted at Local DCR Areas

Celebrate DCR’s 125th birthday by exploring your state park system during the month of August. There are some wonderful programs happening statewide – below are few highlights!  For more information check out the DCR event and program calendar (https://www.mass.gov/service-details/upcoming-programs-and-events)!  Also, be sure to check out the DCR Waterfront Services Schedule for 2018 (https://www.mass.gov/doc/waterfront-services-schedule-may-2018)   for a complete listing of waterfront services.

The following local parks are holding events.

Revere Beach

Reservation

 Shorebird Surprises-

Afternoons

Aug. 21  1-2:30 p.m.

Explore beautiful Revere Beach for birds of the beach and shore. Walk up to three miles on the beach, on mud flats and paths. Some binoculars and a spotting scope will be provided but please bring these items if you have them.  Suitable for adults and children ages 10 and older accompanied by an adult.

Meet at: Revere Beach Reservation, across the street from One Carey Circle on the sidewalk of the semicircular parking lot.  Accessible by MBTA Bus # 441 or 442 to Point of Pines stop: Cross street, turn right and walk approximately 0.3 miles to the sidewalk of the semicircular parking lot across the street from One Carey Circle. Visit www.MBTA.com.

 Impact Travel workshop

Saturday,  Aug. 11

  10:30-1 p.m.

Join HI Boston and the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation for an Impact Travel workshop! Take part in a morning of art through mindfulness on Revere Beach and discover the connection between travel and the local environment with DCR staff. Then participate in a facilitated discussion led by HI Boston staff on how to become a more environmental traveler, and share your thoughts over lunch! This event is FREE and open to the public! Light lunch will be served. However, space is limited so register soon to save your spot! Recommended for adults and teens, but all ages welcome. (Anyone under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult) For more information and to register, https://www.eventbrite.com/e/impact-travel-workshop-tickets-46941868392.

For more information and with questions contact: Educational Programs at HI Boston, liora.norwich@hiusa.org, (617) 230-5798.

Meet At: Outside at the front entrance of One Eliot Circle, Revere, MA  (the tan house at the corner of Dolphin Avenue)  *Optional meet up at 9:45am at HI Boston, 19 Stuart St., 02116. From HI we will proceed together to Revere on public transit.

 Belle Isle Marsh

Reservation

 An Oasis for Birds  

Saturday,  Aug. 18,   

 8 -9 a.m.

Discover the abundant birdlife at Belle Isle Marsh Reservation, a restored wildlife sanctuary. We will walk while birding for a distance of a mile on easy level terrain. Some binoculars and a spotting scope will be provided but please bring these items if you have them.  Reasonable accommodations available upon request.   Suitable for adults and children ages 10 and older accompanied by an adult.

Meet at: On or near the boardwalk to the right of the Bulletin Board, located on Bennington Street, East Boston between address 1236 Bennington St., East Boston and 173 Bennington St., Revere. Parking is on a paved lot and is free of charge.   Accessible by public transportation: MBTA Blue line, Beachmont Station. Exit station, turn right, at intersection, cross State Road/Bennington Street, travel right along Bennington Street to park entrance on the left. Visit www.MBTA.com for bus and train information.

Co-sponsored by the Friends of  Belle Isle Marsh.

Lynn Shore and Nahant Beach Reservation

Exploration Station at the Ward Bathhouse

Saturday,  Aug.  18, 

1:30 -3:30 p.m.

Learn from a Park Interpreter about the rich cultural history of Nahant Beach andor the  nature you may encounter at the Reservation at a station with natural objects and activities. You may arrive at any time from 1:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. on the dates listed.    Suitable for all ages.

Meet at: Inside the James J. Ward Bath House located on the Don John Aliferis Memorial Rotary aka Lynnway Rotary, Lynn MA.  Daily Parking Fee applies.  For a map of the park and information about parking fees visit www.mass.gov/dcr.  Please note that the entrance to the parking lot along Nahant Beach is at the South end of the beach.

Exploration Station at the Halfway Bathhouse

Friday,  Aug. 24

10 a.m.- noon

Learn from a Park Interpreter about the nature you may encounter at the beach and how you can be good stewards of the environment at a station with natural objects and activities. You may arrive at any time from 10:00 a.m.-Noon on the dates listed.   Suitable for all ages.

Meet at: Outside at the Halfway Bathhouse located at the approximate midpoint of Nahant Beach.  Daily Parking Fee applies.  For a map of the park and information about parking fees visit www.mass.gov/dcr.  Please note that the entrance to the parking lot along Nahant Beach is at the South end of the beach

 Winthrop Shores

Reservation-Short Beach

 What Lies Beneath the Sea-Afternoons

Wednesday,  Aug.  22   2-3 p.m.

Did you know that barnacles are an animal that sweeps its legs through the water to catch its food consisting of tiny floating plants and animals? Discover what animals lay beneath the sea on this tide pool exploration and learn how these animals struggle for survival and satisfy their voracious appetites.  Be prepared for walking on rocky and slippery ground and getting your feet wet. Some nets will be provided but bring a net if you have one.  Suitable for children ages 5 and older accompanied by an adult.

Meet at: Short Beach section of Winthrop Shores Reservation, Winthrop, MA, (Beachside on the sidewalk near the boundary between Revere Street, Winthrop, MA and Winthrop Parkway, Revere MA). Parking is free of charge but limited on the street and in a small lot across the street. Co-sponsored by the Friends of  Belle Isle Marsh.

What Lies Beneath the Sea-Mornings

Wednesday, Aug.  15   9-10 a.m.

Did you know that barnacles are an animal that sweeps its legs through the water to catch its food consisting of tiny floating plants and animals? Discover what animals lay beneath the sea on this tide pool exploration and learn how these animals struggle for survival and satisfy their voracious appetites. Be prepared for walking on rocky and slippery ground and getting your feet wet. Some nets will be provided but bring a net if you have one.  Suitable for children ages 5 and older accompanied by an adult.

Meet at: Short Beach section of Winthrop Shores Reservation, Winthrop, MA, (Beachside on the sidewalk near the boundary between Revere Street, Winthrop, MA and Winthrop Parkway, Revere MA). Parking is free of charge but limited on the street and in a small lot across the street.

Co-sponsored by the Friends of  Belle Isle Marsh.

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Healthy Chelsea, Residents Looking to Start Bicycle Safety Committee

Healthy Chelsea, Residents Looking to Start Bicycle Safety Committee

To promote safety and bike laws in urban areas, as well as introduce an emerging biking and pedestrian committee, the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition led an Urban Biking Workshop at the Chelsea Public Library on July 31.

Vivian Ortiz, a League of American Bicyclists, certified instructor, focused on the importance of safety in areas that don’t necessarily offer bike-protected paths, such as Chelsea.

Jennifer Kelly, director of the Healthy Chelsea Coalition, is seeking members to form a biking and pedestrian committee to address the issues and concerns in the community. The committee, funded by the statewide movement to work toward healthy and active lifestyles – dubbed Mass in Motion – will work toward funding programs.

One such program is an outreach effort to give free helmets to bicyclists to increase safety.

“I work as a teacher in Chelsea, and have taken a bike to school. In the mornings when I thought I would feel safe because there wasn’t a lot of traffic, I actually had a couple of problems because I think people at that hour weren’t expecting to see someone on a bike,” Lisa Santagate said. “It was actually scarier than I thought it would be, so I don’t do it all that much, but I really want to.”

Ortiz addressed the importance of understanding that, according to state law, bicycles are considered vehicles, and should be treated as such with traffic laws, traffic flow and signaling. Although Chelsea doesn’t have much in terms of bicycle infrastructure, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) implemented a bike-sharing system to promote bicycle use and offer cheaper travel alternatives.

Residents do have the opportunity to ride on the new shared-use path along the Silver Line, and plans are in the works to include protected bike lanes on the reconstruction of Beacham Street – the only access point into Boston by bike.

LimeBike and Spin’s dockless bike program, introduced in May, opened the dialogue for bike safety in Chelsea, and created an app-based bike rental system that charges riders $1 per hour. Since there are no additions to the city for docking, the city was able to implement the program at no extra cost.

Although there is no added cost, the main concerns brought up by citizens are the bright green bikes being left in places that create a less aesthetically pleasing environment, or in places that can be dangerous, such as pedestrian walkways.

“Riding in an urban area that doesn’t have any bike infrastructure is really, really scary,” Ortiz said. “A lot of my fear in the beginning was folks were just not used to seeing people on bikes in my neighborhood. So that’s one tip that I would give folks, if you’re not comfortable riding by yourself, find a group of people. It’s much easier riding with a group to be on the street because there’s more power in numbers.”

The workshop introduced a variety of group rides that take place throughout the greater Boston area, including Hub on Wheels Sept. 16, as well as general safety tips for riders.

Ortiz’s final tips for riders: ride with traffic, not against it; choose your line and maintain it without swerving or lane splitting; avoid the “right hook” and check to make sure a car isn’t going to turn right in front of you; and always signal turns using the arm signals.

Anyone looking to become more involved in the biking and pedestrian committee can reach out directly to Kelly at jkelly14@partners.org.

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Decision on Two-Way Broadway Traffic Draws Differing Opinions

Decision on Two-Way Broadway Traffic Draws Differing Opinions

The good news for Chelsea residents is that the $5 million redesign of the Broadway business district is moving forward, and a final decision will be made by the City Council about its exact components next month.

And if the vision and innovativeness that City Manager Tom Ambrosino fostered in all parts of Revere can be matched here, then Chelsea residents can expect a Broadway and Bellingham Square bustling with activity and commerce.

But a big question about “The New Broadway” remains: Should the six city blocks from Williams Street to City Hall Avenue be a one-way street (as it exists now and has for many decades) or a two-way street?

The Chelsea Traffic Commission hosted a public meeting Tuesday night at City Hall to hear residents’ opinions about the potential change of Broadway to a two-way street. The Commission is scheduled to vote on the matter at its next meeting before the Council casts the final vote about the entire redesign project, including the traffic plan.

Alexander Train, Chelsea’s assistant director of the department of planning and development, gave a thorough presentation of the re-imagined Broadway project that will totally transform the business district’s intersections, sidewalks, bicycle paths, tree pits, and physical appearance.

“We’ve completed the planning and development portion of the process and we’re now approaching the Traffic Commission to vote and adopt and enact the plan,” said Train. “Their vote will be relayed to City Council, who has the authority to approve or reject their decision.”

Police Chief Brian Kyes spoke in favor of a two-way Broadway, saying it would improve the flow of traffic.

“If a person double parks his vehicle, we have a reason to tow the vehicle ASAP,” said Kyes. “We want to keep the traffic flowing.”

Kyes said he was happy to hear that the intersection of Broadway and Third Street will have traffic lights in the redesign project. “Broadway and Third is probably one of the most dangerous intersections in the entire state,” said Kyes.

He said that when he drove from the police station to City Hall for the meeting, “the backup when I got to Hawthorne Street was incredible, because everybody is making the loop (around Broadway). I think the final [redesign] project makes a lot of sense. I drive down Broadway, Revere all the time and I very, very rarely see double parking there.” Councillor-at-Large Damlili

Vidot said she would like to see the city pay more attention to cleaning up Broadway (such as removing the weed in the metal grates). She also disputed the claim that two-way traffic would curtail double parking and that it would make it safer for pedestrians. She also asked about potential back-ups on the Tobin Bridge and how it would affect traffic on a two-way Broadway.

Vidot said she was not happy with the swiftness of the entire redesign process.

“I urge everyone to just take several steps back and let’s figure out a way to engage more people,” said Vidot. “The way that this process has gone, having a meeting in the middle of summer when the City Council isn’t even meeting – in a hot room where everyone is aggravated and we had to wait 10 minutes to even start the meeting, all of it is just not right.”

Ambrosino, who favors a two-way Broadway, said the traffic configuration should not predominate the discussion of the redesign project.

“That’s only a small part of the reimaging Broadway,” said Ambrosino. “Many of the improvements [to Bellingham Square, Fay Square, City Hall Avenue, traffic signals at dangerous intersections] are happening regardless of which of these two configurations between Williams and Fifth Streets is chosen. Even the one-way configuration is a major improvement over the two-lane speedway that currently exists on Broadway. The two-way configuration is still safer, calmer, and slower for bicylists and pedestrians.”

Ambrosino said the two-way configuration will be “transformative.”

“It will make a difference to the feel and the look of that downtown. It makes it vibrant. It makes it aesthetically pleasing. This will be better for pedestrians, for traffic, and for businesses.”

Rick Gordon, owner of Allen Cut Rite on Broadway, said the No. 1 issue in the downtown district is parking. “I personally prefer a one-way plan for the flow of traffic. The street is much narrower than other communities and I don’t think two-way makes a business more visible.”

Gordon credited the Chelsea Police for their efforts in slowing down motorists and enforcing double-parking restrictions on Broadway. Some residents at the meeting had noted that double-parking is a recurring issue on Broadway.

Councillor-at-Large Roy Avellaneda, whose family owns Tito’s Bakery, asked whether the City Council will have to vote on the redesign project in its entirety as opposed to voting on individual components such as the traffic configuration, and the placement of new bus stops and traffic lights on Broadway.

Following more than two hours of discussion, the one-way/two-way Broadway issue remains a hotly debated one and all eyes will be on the Traffic Commission when it convenes for a vote at its next meeting.WE should be Ambrosino said he favors a two-way Broadway

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Eversource’s Main Street Energy Efficiency Program Delivers Big Savings to Chelsea’s Small Business Community

Eversource’s Main Street Energy Efficiency Program Delivers Big Savings to Chelsea’s Small Business Community

For small business owners looking to make energy-saving improvements to their store or shop, it can sometimes be

Eversource workers helping Chelsea businesses be more energy efficient.

difficult due to the lack of time or available resources. That’s why Eversource recently partnered with the City of Chelsea and its authorized contractor, AECOM, to bring its Main Street program to more than 80 small businesses downtown.

From Washington Avenue to Broadway, a barbershop, bakery, furniture store, and printing shop are just some businesses that will collectively save nearly $150,000 in annual energy costs, thanks to the Main Street program.

B.D.’s Furniture was one business that received new energy-efficient lighting from the Main Street program.

“Customers keep telling me how great the store looks,” said store owner Arthur Tuffaha. “The entire process was easy. I was so impressed with the quality of work that I had my three other stores evaluated for energy efficiency upgrades.”

“Our Main Street program focuses on a specific neighborhood and provides personal attention to the small businesses within that community,” said Eversource Energy Efficiency Spokesman Bill Stack. “Working with a municipal partner, we do everything we can to make sure our customers really understand the energy-saving opportunities available to them. The City of Chelsea was a tremendous partner connecting our small business customers to solutions for savings.”

The Main Street energy efficiency program begins with a no-cost energy assessment conducted by an Eversource-authorized contractor identifying energy-saving opportunities such as new lighting, occupancy sensors, programmable thermostats and more. Some of the improvements, such as installing new energy-efficient light bulbs, occur right on the spot. Larger improvement projects, such as new HVAC or energy-efficient motor controls, are scheduled for direct installation at a future date and may qualify for Mass Save incentives to offset the cost of upgrades.

In addition to helping its retail customers, the program will also contribute to the City’s overall sustainability goals to be a cleaner, greener place. Over the next decade, the collective energy saved from the improvements could power approximately 1,300 homes for a year. The avoided CO-2 emissions are the equivalent of removing nearly 1,200 cars from the road for an entire year.

“The Main Street program has really enlivened our downtown area through the lighting upgrades, which I’m sure will help attract more business,” said Chelsea Downtown Coordinator Mimi Graney. “But not only is it good for business, it’s also good for the environment. We’re located right under jets flying out of Logan Airport and face heavy emissions from trucks, so I always look at ways to curb carbon emissions. The best way to do so is to start with our business community. I enjoyed making introductions between the owners and Eversource and being a true ambassador of the program.”

Eversource recently started its preliminary Main Street program outreach in Natick. The company will soon be launching programs in Somerville and Springfield and is actively seeking other Eversource communities to participate.

For more information about Eversource’s energy efficiency programs, rebates and incentives, or to schedule an energy assessment for your business, visit the Save Money & Energy section of   Eversource.com or call 1-844-887-1400.

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Police Briefs 07-12-2018

Police Briefs 07-12-2018

Monday, 6/18

Jose Sanchez, 21, 63 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for a warrant.

Tuesday, 6/19

Bryan Cabrera, 21, 45 Heard St., Chelsea, was arrested for stop sign violation, operating motor vehicle with a suspended license and carrying dangerous weapon.

Gustavo Contreras, 45, 151 Division St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed.

David Hernandez Arevalo, 20, 40 Maverick St., Chelsea, was arrested for a warrant.

William Hernandez-Galdamez, 35, 263 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery.

Wednesday, 6/20

Weimar Pineda-Bedoya, 25, 1061 Saratoga St., East Boston, was arrested for witness intimidation.

Thales Silva, 21, 74 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and unregistered motor vehicle.

Marco Roman, 21, 31 Crescent Ave., Everett, was arrested on warrants.

Luis Llanso, 34, 69 McGreevey Way, Roxbury, was arrested for assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and on warrants.

Thursday, 6/21

Harold Aguirre Godoy, 23, 154 Shawmut St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Saturday, 6/23

Jose Guerrero, 30, 69 Addison St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and stop sign violation.

Kiana Rivera, 23, 284 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Daniel Lopez-Galdamez, 32, 13 Blossom, St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, reckless operation of motor vehicle, leaving scene of property damage, marked lanes violation, speeding and operating motor vehicle with suspended license.

Sunday, 6/24

Camilo Ruiz, 44, 57 Heard St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating motor vehicle unlicensed and red light violation.

Juan Ramos, 32, 117 Spencer Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for witness intimidation, miscellaneous common law violation and disorderly conduct.

Monday, 6/25

Tito Ebanks-Lopez, 29, 61 Exeter St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon.

Frank Arsenault, 48, 34 Grove St., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, leaving scene of property damage, marked lanes violation and possessing alcoholic beverage.

Tuesday, 6/26

Frederick Stearns, 46, 76 Tudor St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Wednesday, 6/27

Sandra Sargent, 33, 71 Winthrop Ave., ,Revere, was arrested on warrants.

Thursday, 6/28/18

Eddy Torres, 24, 165 Mountain Ave., Revere, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, marked lanes violation, negligent operation of motor vehicle and threat to commit a crime.

Friday, 6/29

Kevin Johnson, 19, 250 Congress Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant, operating motor vehicle with suspended license and one way violation.

Saturday, 6/30

Justin Williams, 29, 547 Proctor Ave., Revere, was arrested for trespassing.

Luis Cahuil, 37, 649 Washington Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor.

Miguel Munguia, 32, 84 Marlborough St., Chelsea, was arrested for trespassing, disturbing the peace and possessing open container of alcohol in motor vehicle.

Abel Jimenez, 29, 444 Harrison Ave., Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage.

Julio Portillo, 51, Pine Street Inn, Boston, was arrested for possessing alcoholic beverage.

Sunday, 7/1

Jennifer Corey, 37, 28 Park St., Malden, was arrested for utter false check, forgery of c heck and larceny by check over $250.

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Residence Inn Petitions to Expand Property by 68 Rooms

Residence Inn Petitions to Expand Property by 68 Rooms

The Residence Inn by Marriott on Maple Street has petitioned the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) to expand their 128-room hotel by another 68 rooms.

The expansion would take place in the existing surface lot to the north of the hotel. The idea would be to create a 200-room dual branded hotel, which is a current direction in the lodging industry.

The expansion would add 28,234 sq. ft. to the existing structure. The majority of the hotel is extended stay rooms now, but there would be 12 non-extended stay rooms created during the expansion, if approved.

A special permit is required for parking because 118 spaces are required, and only 86 are provided. A Site Plan Review process is also required.

The matter has been in front of the ZBA already for a preliminary hearing, and a vote on the the project is expected at this month’s meeting.

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Hotel Study Indicates Chelsea Could Support an Upscale Property

Hotel Study Indicates Chelsea Could Support an Upscale Property

A long-awaited hotel study commissioned by the City has been completed and indicates that the market in Chelsea could support and ‘upper upscale’ property if one were proposed.

City Manager Tom Ambrosino commissioned the study last year when a hotel was proposed on Second Street, and it wasn’t certain if the market in Chelsea could bear more hotel rooms coming online.

The study was done by the Pinnacle Advisory Group, and they indicated that a seventh hotel property in Chelsea could be successful – perhaps one that is nicer than all of the others.

“Considering the City’s current supply of hotels, we believe a new hotel, the City’s seventh, could be developed as a 125 to 150 room, nationally branded hotel,” read the report. “While we would recommend an upscale or upper upscale hotel product…we believe the ultimate product should be determined by the developer.”

By contrast, the Homewood Suites and Residence Inn in Chelsea are considered upscale. The Hilton Boston Logan and Hyatt Boston Harbor – both at the airport – are considered in the upper upscale class.

“I’m not surprised by the findings,” said Ambrosino. “The one thing we wanted to find out is if the city could support another hotel development. The answer is yes, particularly more hotels on the waterfront. That’s something I think we could try to encourage.”

He said he was also encouraged by the suggestion that the market could bear a more luxurious product than the very nice hotels already in Chelsea.

“It’s one notch up from the Homewood Suites, which is a nice hotel, and that’s a move forward for the city,” he said. “Whether we can attract that or not, I don’t know, but that would be our goal – especially something with a nice restaurant included.”

The study also indicates the best areas for another hotel would be on the east side of the Chelsea Creek and at the Mystic Mall.

“We believe the City’s seventh hotel should be developed in conjunction with support amenities in a location proximate to Boston Logan Airport and the new MBTA Silver Line,” read the report.

The study was forwarded to the City Council on Monday for review. No new proposals have been forwarded, thought the Residence Inn on has proposed an expansion at its existing property.

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