Roberto Jiménez Rivera Announces Run for Chelsea School Committee At-Large

Chelsea’s vibrant and welcoming community is the reason my wife Sarah and I chose to buy our home here. We hope to have children soon and can’t wait to send them to Chelsea Public Schools. I recognize the incredible potential our community holds, and want to help all our children achieve their goals and become part of the next generation of leaders in our community and beyond. For that reason, I am announcing my candidacy for Chelsea School Committee At-Large. As of this week, my signatures have been certified and I am officially on the ballot for the 2019 municipal election. I am excited to continue meeting Chelsea residents as I get ready to become an advocate for our students!

After high school, I was fortunate to earn a scholarship that allowed me to graduate college with little debt. I left my island of Puerto Rico to attend the University of Michigan, and after getting Bachelor’s degrees in business and informatics and a Master’s degree in higher education, I moved to Massachusetts for work.

Today, as a college admissions officer, I work hard to find students whose lives will be transformed by a college education in the same way mine has been. I’m running for Chelsea School Committee because I want more of our students to graduate high school and obtain a college degree. I want our students to feel supported from PreK to 12 and imagine broader possibilities for their future. I hope to have your support with your vote on Nov. 5.

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August Madness : Umemba, Castro Prepare for Fifth Annual Let It Fly Basketball Tournament Aug. 10

The five years have passed quickly since Kyle Umemba and Cesar Castro decided they wanted to run a basketball tournament for the youth of Chelsea.

“We’re just two Chelsea guys in the community giving back,” said Umemba.

Year Five for the Let It Fly Basketball Tournament is here and the best players in the area will gathering on Saturday, Aug. 10 at the Jordan Boys and Girls Club on Willow Street.

The first tournament in 2015 was held outside in 90-degree heat. The steamy weather prompted Kyle, 26, a graduate of BB&N and George Washington University, finance professional and fashion model – and Cesar, 28, a graduate of Salem State University known as “The Grand Young Man” for scoring 1,000 points in his CHS basketball career, CHS basketball coach and paraprofessional in the school district – brought the tournament indoors and it’s been played at the JGBC basketball gymnasium ever since.

According to the two co-directors, all the stuff that makes the tournament so special will be back in 2019. There will be public address announcing for each game, a DJ’s musical entertainment, free refreshments, and a raffle table.

Key community leaders such as CBC President Joan Cromwell (“We couldn’t do this without Joan,” son Kyle Umemba says proudly) and Chelsea Police Community Liaison Officer Sammy Mojica Sr. will be on hand to help make sure everything runs smoothly. Chelsea Police Officers David Batchelor and Keith Sweeney are also valuable contributors to the tournament each year.

Sammy Mojica Jr., who played college basketball at Drexel and is currently a professional player in the Puerto Rico Basketball League, will make a guest appearance. One year, NBA player Nerlens Noel of Everett, made a guest appearance.

One of the best players in the Let It Fly Tournament will be Jarnel Guzman, an All-Scholastic guard who led Lynn English to the Division 1 state championship in March.“If they’re a big name player in New England, they’ll be here,” said Castro.

Twelve teams, eight high school and four middle school, will compete for the titles. A standing room only crowd is expected throughout the day.

“It’s great energy,” said Umemba. “We want others to follow our lead and I think it’s having that kind of effect. One of our scholarship recipients, Alfredo Hernandez, held a tournament at Chelsea High School.”

“There was a tournament held at Clinton Court that was generated by our idea for a tournament,” added Castro.

Umemba and Castro aren’t sitting on their success. The plans are to take ‘Let It Fly’ national in the next few years.

And if their organizational talents in making Let It fly the premier summer hoop extravaganza in Greater Boston are any indication, we would suggest either get on aboard or get out of the way.

“We’re building a platform in Chelsea,” said Umemba.

“The important thing is that everybody has a great

time,” concluded Castro.

And if you can’t be there to enjoy the tournament in person, Chelsea Community Cable Television will be there to record the action for a broadcast.

“We’re so grateful to Mr. [Robert] Bradley and his station for covering it every year.” said the directors.

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Nevena Jurisic of Chelsea Receives Teamsters Local 25 Scholarship

Teamsters Local 25 awarded college scholarships worth $60,000 to 30 high school students at its May 19 membership meeting, held at the Local 25 Union Hall. Nevena Jurisic, of Chelsea, was among the recipients. A recent graduate of Chelsea High School, Ryan will attend Salem State University fall. Nevena is the daughter of Tihomir Jurisic, a Teamsters Local 25 member that works at Paul Revere Transportation.

“These students are the future of our nation,” said Teamsters Local 25 President Sean M. O’Brien. “They are smart, engaged and an example of all that is good in the world. If the achievements and goals they have had so far is any indication, we can expect nothing but greatness from the future generation.”

President O’Brien was joined by Massachusetts Congresswoman Lori Trahan (MA-3), who helped present the student scholarships.

“I am so proud of the 30 recipients of the Teamsters Local 25 Scholarships. I grew up in a union household, and know first-hand how important this kind of support can be to families working hard to make ends meet so they can build a better life for themselves and their children. Supporting one another is what union membership is all about. I look forward to these students continuing to grow and make a positive impact in their communities,” said Trahan.

Since 2006, Teamsters Local 25 has awarded nearly $600,000 in scholarship funds. All students are children or grandchildren of Local 25 members or retirees.

Teamsters Local 25 is the largest Teamsters Union in New England, representing more than 12,000 workers.

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Here Comes Herbie! : Chelsea Legend Celebrates His 80th Birthday

Happy 80th birthday, Herbie Kupersmith.

A huge crowd is expected to be on hand when Chelsea honors one of its most prominent and philanthropic individuals on July 27 at the Saul Nechtem Gymnasium.

And what they will be celebrating is not only Herbie Kupersmith’s milestone birthday but all the good deeds that Herbie has done in a life well lived.

Herbie’s proud family, his wife, Cookie, daughters, Karyn, Stacey, and Marci and grandchildren, Michael, Jackie, and Colin head the list of guests that will travel far and wide to be at the party.

Guidance From his Mother and Four Valuable Mentors

Herbie Kupersmith moved from Brooklyn to Chelsea with his mother, Sally, when he was two-and-half years old.

“We lived on 13 Michael’s Place, which was off Williams Street,” said Herbie, an only child. “We were 35 feet away from the Chelsea Dump.”

Four highly respected Chelsea men would become Herbie’s “mentors.”

“Hugh J. McLaughlin, the former mayor, Julius Zeff, teacher and basketball coach, Paul “Choc” Glazer, community leader and head of the YMHA, and Harry Coltun, legal counsel for the Mass. House of Representatives – those four people, along with my mother – made it possible for me to be the person I am today,” said Herbie.

Herbie began attending the Walnut Street Synagogue as a young boy and was bar mitzvahed there in 1952. It was the beginning of his lifelong connection and support of the shul. Through the years Herbie has been instrumental in fundraising and helping the historic shul remain in operation.

What Herbie remembers most about his bar mitzvah was the advice he received from his mother in the form of three letters she had handwritten to him.

“Never drink the cup dry – leave some for other people,” recalled Herbie. “No. 2 was, if you’re going to do something, do it because you want to do it, not because you want to get accolades. And No. 3, my mother wrote, ‘I want you to be a giver, not a taker.’”

Herbie developed a love of sports at a young age. He was the starting guard for the Williams Junior High School basketball team that won 27 games in a row. He later played basketball at Chelsea High School for Coach Saul Nechtem.

Success in the Business World

After high school Herbie took a job at Nunn Bush selling shoes at Kennedy’s and Filene’s.

He had other jobs in sales before taking a position at Bobbie Brooks, a junior sportswear company.

With his magnetic personality, charisma, style, street smarts, common sense, honesty and integrity, Herbie set sales records and took over the entire Boston territory. He remained at Bobbie Brooks for 25 years.

All About Family

He met his future wife, Cookie, on a blind date and they were married in May, 1965.

They began their life together in Malden and moved to Marblehead in December, 1965. They have lived in the town ever since.

The Kupersmiths have three children, Karyn, Stacey, and Marci, all of whom are college graduates. Two of the Kupersmith grandchildren, Michael Walsh and Jackie Walsh, are graduates of Brown University. A third grandchild, Colin Walsh, is a student at Elon College in North Carolina.

A Party for Herbie That is Also a Testimonial

The upcoming birthday party will be a testimonial in many ways, with so many people wanting to thank Herbie for the help and support he has given them in so many ways.

The student-athletes like former Marblehead and Stonehill College basketball standout David Siggers, the coaches like John DiBiaso, the members of the congregation at Walnut Street Synagogue, the business associates, the friends like lifelong buddy Lennie Nelson, the co-chairs of planning committees like the great Minna Karas-Marino, and the city officials like Leo Robinson – they’ll all be there to say “Thank you, Herbie,” for being such a positive, uplifting presence in my life.

Rita’s will cater the gala affair. Comedian Brad Mastrangelo will perform and DJ George Athas will provide the musical entertainment. Former City Manager Jay Ash will be one of the speakers during the program.

“It should be a nice evening,” said Herbie humbly.

True to Herbie’s giving nature, all donations from the birthday party will go toward a scholarship fund for Chelsea students.

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An Excel-Lent Journey Chelsea’s Vanesa Perea Will Attend Harvard University

Vanesa Perea, who enrolled at Excel Academy East Boston in the fifth grade and graduated from Excel Academy High School in June, will begin her studies at Harvard University as a member of the incoming Class of 2023.

Admission to the world’s most prestigious college culminated an eight-year journey of educational enrichment and academic achievement for high honor roll student Vanesa Perea at the Excel charter schools, whose mission is to prepare students to succeed in high school and college, apply their learning to solve relevant problems, and engage productively in their communities.

Excel Academy High School graduate Vanesa Perea of Chelsea will be attending Ivy League school Harvard University in Cambridge

Perea, whose parents, Jose Perea and Luz Piedrahita, are originally from Colombia, was a shining example as a member of the first graduating class at Excel, which opened its new high school on Bremen Street in East Boston at the beginning of her sophomore year.

She attended the Kelly School in Chelsea through grade four before entering Excel in the fifth grade.

Many accomplishments and school activities at Excel

Excel does not select a class valedictorian or have an academic ranking system, but Vanesa’s achievements in all aspects of school life speak for themselves.

She had an outstanding grade point average and received a number of academic honors including the school’s Mathematics Award and National Honor Society Award. She was treasurer of the National Honor Society.

This year Vanesa took Advanced Placement courses in Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, Statistics, and Literature and Composition. Other AP courses were taken in Language and Composition, U.S. History, Biology, Spanish, and World History in her two prior academic years.

“I like STEM,” said Vanessa, explaining the concentration of courses in science and mathematics.

Vanesa also took her talents to the athletic fields where she competed in varsity soccer and served as team captain for two seasons. She was also a member of the Excel track team.

One of her most recognized accomplishments was founding the school newspaper, “The Howler,” and serving as editor of the publication. The school presented a graduation award named in honor of Vanesa and her classmate, Evelyn Rodriguez, the other co-founder of the newspaper. That award went to the newspaper’s founding duo.

She was the backstage director for the Music Club and served on the Student Council for two years.

Vanesa also volunteers as an English tutor for immigrants at a center in East Boston.

Receiving the acceptance letter from Harvard

Vanesa applied to Harvard in its Restrictive Early Action program. She received notification of her acceptance in December.

“December 13,” said Vanesa, recalling the day she learned that the next stop in her career would be in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “I was very excited. I called my mom and I said, ‘Mom, I did it!’

She had enjoyed the positive learning experiences at the Crimson Summer Academy and the summer classes at Harvard she took last summer in Introduction to Biomedical Ethics and Expository Writing.

She is considering a major in Biology, Chemistry, Applied Mathematics and Economics at Harvard.

“I’m going to explore a little and see which field of study I really like so that I can end up doing something that I’m passionate about,” related Vanesa, who may pursue a pre-medical school path or a future career in consulting. She has received a full scholarship from Harvard.

Praise for her teachers and college counselor

Vanesa said she was grateful to the teachers at Excel, particularly her junior-year Mathematics teacher, Sarah Hafele.

“Ms. Hafele is a lot like me – I really love math and she shares that passion,” said Vanesa. “I like math tutoring so I asked her if I could tutor some of her math students. During my senior year we started a math tutoring, honors pre-calculus program which went really well. She’s a very kind person.”

Vanesa also credited Excel counselor Nicole Repp for her assistance and guidance in the college application process (Vanesa was also accepted in to the UMass/Amherst honors program).

“Ms. Repp began advising me in my junior year and working on essay preparation and she was very helpful,” said Vanesa.

This summer, Vanesa is teaching Mathematics at the Excel Academy summer program in Chelsea.

Support and encouragement from CSC member Kelly Garcia

One of Vanesa’s proud supporters at Excel is schoolteacher Kelly Garcia, a Latina member of the Chelsea School Committee (CSC).

“I heard Vanesa’s story and I wanted to let the people know – she’s from Chelsea and she makes us all proud,” said Garcia. “There are many obstacles against us, but she is one that is breaking all barriers and stereotypes and I want her to be celebrated and recognized in her beautiful city of Chelsea.”

Garcia said she hopes Vanesa’s success story as the daughter of immigrants “will inspire students to keep working hard and know that anything is possible if you put your mind to it.”

Gratitude to her parents

Vanesa’s father, Jose, is a driver for a senior center while her mother, Luz, is a teaching assistant at an early childhood learning center.

“My parents have set a great example for me with their hard work,” said Vanesa. “They are my motivation.”

Another positive role model is her older brother, Jhonatan, a Chelsea High School graduate who just received his degree in Biology from Boston University. He works at the Boston Medical Center.

“Jhonatan set a very good example,” lauded Vanesa. “I never knew the extent of how good a role model he was until I went through my own college process and realized how incredible a school Boston University is. He accomplished it first and I want to be like him.”

Looking back at her career in the Excel system, Vanessa said, “I’m very happy I attended Excel. It’s been a great experience. The people at Excel inspired me to pursue my goals.” Chelsea Soldiers’ Home awarded $100 million to replace

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Congratulations, Brian Sullivan

We have been remiss for not having offered our congratulations to Chelsea native Brian Sullivan upon his recent appointment by Gov. Charlie Baker, and subsequent confirmation by the Governor’s Council, to the position of Clerk-Magistrate of the Lynn District Court.

Brian’s ascension to the clerk-magistrate’s position culminates a long career in the court system that began as a Probation Officer in the Chelsea District Court in 1986. He became an assistant clerk-magistrate in that court and then the Salem District Court before being named the Acting Clerk Magistrate of the Cambridge District Court prior to his appointment to the Lynn District Court.

Brian is a Chelsea guy through-and-through. His dad, the late Vincent Sullivan, who was the long-time Assistant Commandant of the Chelsea Soldiers Home, and his mom, Eleanor, raised their four children in the Mill Hill section of the city, where they were one of the most-respected families in Chelsea.

Brian attended St. Rose grammar school before going on to Malden Catholic and Northeastern University. He was a member of the Chelsea Knights of Columbus and was well-known as a member of the K of C’s softball team in the heyday of the Chelsea Modified Fast Pitch Softball League when that league drew huge crowds to Highland Park in the early 1980s.

Brian married the former Paula Hansbury, who also is a Chelsea native and well-known Chelsea High grad, and they have raised their family in Swampscott.

If we were writing this column in another era, it might have been titled, “Local boy makes good.” We know we speak for all of those who have been friends and acquaintances of Brian Sullivan and his family through the years in offering our congratulations to Brian upon his appointment and in wishing him continued success in his outstanding career in the Massachusetts judicial system.

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Engineering Success On the Court Robinson-Griggs Builds a Legacy as MIT Coach

Lucia Robinson-Griggs, who graduated from Pope John XXIII High School as one of its greatest athletes of all time, is enjoying much success in the coaching ranks.

Lucia Robinson-Griggs, MIT women’s basketball associate head coach, proudly holds the team’s NEWMAC championship trophy at the conference tournament in Springfield in the company of her proud family, from left, cousin Maureen Lee, cousin, Nickolette
Mauch, father, Leo Robinson, uncle, D. Bruce Mauch, aunt, Gail Mauch, and aunt, Arlene Robinson.

Robinson-Griggs just completed a tremendous season as the associate head coach of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) women’s basketball team. The Lady Engineers captured the NEWMAC Conference Championship for the second year in row.

MIT played St. Joseph’s of Maine in the first round of the NCAA Division 3 Tournament and lost 68-61.

Lucia’s father, Councillor-at-Large Leo Robinson, mother, REACH Executive Director Linda Alioto-Robinson, uncle, Chelsea Clock Company Vice President D. Bruce Mauch, and aunts Gail Mauch and Arlene Robinson traveled to Ithaca College to root on Lucia’s MIT contingent in the NCAA first round game.

Robinson-Griggs, who began her basketball career in the Chelsea Youth Basketball League before starring for the Pope John Tigers, was promoted to associate head coach at MIT this season. She recorded her 100th career win at MIT in November.

A rewarding experience at MIT

What is the experience like coaching at MIT, one of the most prestigious academic institutions in the world?

“Coaching at MIT is incredibly rewarding and inspiring,” said Robinson-Griggs. “The women on the team are able to balance their heavy course work, research and internships and are still able to be “all in” for basketball. They spend time being dedicated to watching film, working out in the weight room and doing their best on the court.”

Robinson-Griggs said because of the student-athletes’ rigorous academic requirements, the coaching staff has to be well prepared for the daily practices and strategy sessions.

“As a coach, our players’ schedules really force you to be prepared in order to maximize your time with the team,” said Robinson-Griggs. “We only have a two-hour window for practices, so our plans for skill development and planning for opponents needs to be all encompassing and ready to go. Knowing after graduation, the players will go on to have their pick of careers makes you feel a sense of pride and awe that they also chose to play basketball as part of their collegiate experience.”

Robinson-Griggs was previously the head coach of the Lesley University women’s basketball team, leading the Lady Lynx to two conference championships.

From college player

to college coach

Robinson-Griggs played college basketball at Bentley University, a perennial Division 2 powerhouse coached by Barbara Stevens. She received her undergraduate degree from Bentley and holds a Master’s degree in Mathematics from Lesley. She is a mathematics teacher at Revere High School where she has also coached in the football program. She is a former women’s professional football player for the Mass Militia.

Robinson-Griggs has worked at several summer basketball camps, including one directed by Brown University head coach Sarah Behn, the former BC and Foxboro High School standout.

Leo Robinson, who played basketball for Chelsea High School and Burdett College, said he was proud of his daughter’s many accomplishments in the sport of basketball. He credits her dedication and mastery of the fundamentals of the game as key factors in her success as a coach.

“Lucia is a sound coach who understands the fundamentals,” said Leo. “She is a good strategist who watches a lot of game film.”

Robinson-Griggs was the keynote speaker at the city’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration in January. The 31-year-old scholar-athlete, role model and coach delivered an inspiring address that earned her a standing ovation from the audience.

Lucia and her husband, Michael, live in Chelsea and have two children, Kaia, 4, and Kellan, 2.

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Alumnus Elliot Katzman moderates Salem State University’s Agganis Forum

Former Chelsea High scholar-athlete Elliot Katzman served as moderator for Salem State University’s Agganis Forum Monday night at the university’s Recital Hall.

Katzman appeared at the forum with entrepreneur and philanthropist Bill Cummings. Katzman interviewed Cummings about his successful career as the founder of Cummings Properties, Inc., that is responsible for buying, building, and managing over 10 million square feet of commercial real estate in eastern Massachusetts.

Cummings and his wife, Joy, are the founders of New Horizons not-for-profit assisted and independent living communities and the Cummings Foundation that has distributed more than $200 million in charities since 1986.

Asked about his splendid performance as moderator that drew applause from the audience, Katzman said humbly, “It was an honor to moderate the discussion with Bill Cummings. He is not only an incredibly successful entrepreneur, but an amazing individual who is making a big impact in the world.”

Katzman himself is also an incredible success story. He is a Salem State alumnus, a Salem State trustee, and general partner at Commonwealth Capital Ventures, a private venture capital firm based in Woburn that invests in early and growth stage technology companies. Prior to joining Commonwealth in 2007, Katzman was a general partner at Kodiak Venture Partners from 2002 to 2006.

Elliot and his wife, Donna (Frangiamone) Katzman, were classmates at Chelsea High. They reside in Marblehead.

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Keeping It in the Family DiPietro Dentistry Boasts 65 Years of Family Dental Care

Keeping It in the Family DiPietro Dentistry Boasts 65 Years of Family Dental Care

By Sue Ellen Woodcock

For 65 years, the DiPietro family has been offering general family dentistry to patients from Revere and around the area. Keeping the business strong today are three siblings.

Dr. William DiPietro DMD, Dr. Christopher DiPietro DMD (Tufts University School of Dental Medicine) and dental hygienist Gina DiPietro share their workspace and their enthusiasm for dentistry every day.

Their father Dr. Joseph DiPietro, who lived on Rumney Road, started the business in 1954 and built the office at 123 Revere St. in the 1970s. He retired at the end of 1993 and passed away in 2016.

“It’s been two generations of personal care and attention,” said Dr. Christopher DiPietro.

The practice uses an intra-oral camera so patients can see the work going on, and all the dental work done in high magnification, he added. They also use digital X-rays.

“We use the latest materials, metal free,” Dr. Christopher DiPietro said.

Dr. Rebecca Paccone, DMD, is also a member of the practice. Paccone is a graduate from University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. The practice uses specialists for oral surgery. Most root canals are done in the office, but in a pinch a specialist can also be called in.

Many of the employees have worked for DiPietro for more than 10 years.

DiPietro Family Dental Care was awarded 2018 Best of the Best Award from Market Surveys of America.

“Our father had a lot of influence on us, we wanted to be like him,” Dr. Christopher DiPietro, adding that when they came to the office the biggest toy was the water spray.

As the siblings matured, they would assist their father with dental procedures, handing him instruments and gauze as needed.

All of this exposure to dentistry at a young age has stayed with all three through adulthood.

“Being exposed at an early age, we picked up on the dentistry,” said Dr. Christopher DiPietro. “That’s how we developed an interest. Today they find they can be working at opposite ends of the building and not see each other all day.”

“We get so busy with what we are doing,” he said, but they’ve allowed each other to have space.

They can also brag that they have some of their original patients from 1954.

“We have some who were single in 1954, who are now great grandparents,” he said. “We have a lot of generations of the same family. That’s pretty much how we have built our patient base.”

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Smiles All Round – Dr. Fatima Maarouf Celebrates Second Year in Winthrop

Smiles All Round – Dr. Fatima Maarouf Celebrates Second Year in Winthrop

Dr. Fatima Maarouf is approaching the second anniversary of her growing dental practice, Harborside Dental, 313 Main Street.

Two years ago Dr. Maarouf made a major decision in her career to acquire the practice of long-time Winthrop dentist, Dr. Richard Schwartz, who had served the community for four decades.

“Dr. Schwartz retired and I took over the practice,” said Dr. Maarouf proudly.

One of the first orders of business was selecting a name for her new practice. As a homage to the town’s status as a seaside treasure, Dr. Maarouf chose, “Harborside.”

“I think of Winthrop as a beach town and I love the beach and being around Winthrop, so we decided Harborside is a good, calming name,” she revealed.

Dr. Maarouf has made an investment in the town and its future. She and her husband, Hugo Solis, who works as an attorney for the BPDA and as a real estate agent for the Winthrop office of Coldwell Banker, moved from East Boston to Winthrop a year ago. Harborside Dental is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and she and her husband are members of the Cottage Park Yacht Club.

Harborside’s dental assistant, Mirjeta Gjinovici, and treatment coordinator, Lindsey Robinson, also call Winthrop their home.

There have been some noticeable changes made in the dental office in the past two years. Dr. Maarouf renovated the entire office, installing new dental chairs, computers, software and other state-of-the-art equipment.

Dr. Maarouf, 33, grew up in Lebanon where she attended American University of Beirut and received her degree in Biology in 2007. She graduated from the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry in Richmond in 2011. She moved to Boston in 2012 and completed her residency program at Tufts University, performing adult special needs dental care and hospital-based dental care.

“I ended up loving Boston and staying in the area,” said Dr. Maarouf.

She became an associate dentist at offices in the Boston area, but had dreamed of having her own practice.

“I realized that eventually I wanted to be a business owner,” said Dr. Maarouf. “When this practice came up, it was in a really cute town and excellent location with ample parking and T accessibility, so I felt it was a great opportunity. My husband and I really love it here. My team also lives here. We’re all invested in the town.”

Dr. Maarouf performs dentistry for patients of all ages, as early as age one to those in their senior years.

“We do a variety of fillings, crowns, fluoride treatments (for children), cleanings, extensive veneer and bridgework, implants, extractions, and teeth whitening,” said Dr. Maarouf. “We also work closely with specialists for certain procedures such as extensive root canals and implant placement.”

Dr. Maarouf recommends preventative care for all patients and suggests regular checkups every six months.

She has begun a series of educational visits to local pre-schools where she talks about the importance of dental care. “Prevention is really important, especially when kids are young,” she said. “I try to teach them that it’s fun to be at the dentist.”

Dr. Maarouf tries to accommodate her many patients’ work and activity schedules with expanded office hours (8 a.m.- 7 p.m. on some days and is open one Saturday a month).

And she is also expanding her knowledge, keeping abreast of the latest technological advances in the dentistry. “I do a lot of continuing education courses and attend workshops and seminars throughout the country.”

Dr. Maarouf said the decision to open her own practice was a tough one, but she is pleased with the reception in Winthrop and excited about her future here.

“There are challenges that you don’t anticipate and you’re responsible for everything, good and bad, so there’s a lot that is put on your shoulders – but when you’re trying to create something that you love, it makes it all worth it at the end of the day,” Dr. Maarouf concluded.

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