Bicycle Laundry Looking to Locate on Willow Street

Bicycle Laundry Looking to Locate on Willow Street

A commercial laundry that uses bicycles to pick up and deliver linens is looking to locate in the commercial/industrial property on Willow and Congress Streets.

Wash Cycle Laundry, a company founded in Philadelphia that has delivered millions of pounds of laundry and pioneered the bicycle laundry, wants to locate its Boston area operations in Chelsea. They were before the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) on Tuesday night, and will go before the Planning Board later in the month. In April, the City changed the zoning regulations in the Willow Street area to allow them to consider the property.

Gabriel Mandujano, the founder of the company, said they are coming right now to service the hotels exclusively in Chelsea, and would be using a new, advanced style of tricycle to pick up and deliver laundry throughout the city.

“We leased a portion of the building and are concentrating our efforts on the hotel market,” he said. “Colwen Hotels signed an agreement to bring us to Chelsea. We’re going to be their laundry contractor. The idea is they have a lot of properties in Chelsea, but they have a large portfolio all over Boston too. This will bring those jobs to Chelsea.”

He said they hope to run two shifts seven days a week, and would employ a total of 75 people.

“We are a sustainable company,” he said. “We do  a lot of environmental and energy savings in the plant. We are founded in Philadelphia and pioneered bicycle delivery laundry. We delivered millions and millions of pounds of laundry in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. We are though practically sustainable and not religiously sustainable, so the chiefly concerned about safety.”

He said that would mean that they would deliver by bike in the Chelsea area, but use vans and trucks to get to Boston and other far off areas.

He said after they get their feet under them, if approved to come, they hoped to begin doing work for other businesses in Chelsea that have a need for a commercial laundry.

He said they would be using a special tricycle cargo bike in Chelsea that has been piloted by the UPS delivery company in Portland. He said they took a trip recently to Portland to test it out and liked what they saw.

“We’re fairly confident that would be the vehicle we would use if we come to Chelsea,” he said. “Philadelphia is completely flat, so we need something here with a little more power.”

He added they are a second chance company, and hope to partner with non-profits in the area to employ at-risk and court-involved residents who need a break. Many of their current employees have a history of homelessness or incarceration, he said.

“That’s one of the main reasons I founded the company,” he said.

If allowed to locate on Willow Street, Mandujano said they could have the build out done in about 30 days.

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Police Briefs 12-14-2017

Police Briefs 12-14-2017

POLICE INVESTIGATE SHOOTING

Chelsea Police Detectives are investigating a shooting on Dec. 7 that occurred in the vicinity of Shurtleff and Maverick Streets. The victim, a 35-year old male from Chelsea, was shot in the leg and is expected to recover from his injuries. Detectives believe it was not a random attack based on preliminary evidence gathered at the scene.

A male wearing a dark coat with red lettering on the back and gray sweatpants was seen fleeing the area.

If you have any information regarding this incident, you are asked to call Chelsea Police at 466-4800.

Chelsea Police remind the community they can report crimes or suspicious activity anonymously in various formats. Citizens can call the 24 hr “tips” line at 617-466-4880, email reports directly from the department’s website at www.chelseapolice.com or download for free the MYPD App that is compatible with both Android and Apple smartphones. All three ways are monitored and anonymous.

ARMED ROBBER CAUGHT

On Dec. 4, officers were dispatched to Broadway Mini Mart located at 944 Broadway on a report of an armed robbery. Responding officers observed a disturbance in the street involving a store clerk and one of the two reported robbers. The subject was placed into custody at the scene. Chelsea Detectives later charged the individual with two other armed robberies that occurred earlier in Chelsea.

A second individual involved was able to escape.

Samuel Valdez, 41, of Jamaica Plain, was charged with armed robbery while masked and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

SALVADORAN MAN DEPORTED

A Salvadoran national pleaded guilty yesterday in federal court in Boston to illegally reentering the United States after deportation.

Gerardo Alberto Perez-Fuentes, 22, pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful reentry of a deported alien.  U.S. District Court Judge Nathaniel M. Gorton scheduled sentencing for March 8, 2018.

Perez-Fuentes was previously deported on Oct. 8, 2015.  On Sept. 6, 2017, law enforcement in Chelsea encountered Perez-Fuentes and determined him to be illegally present in the United States.

The charge provides for a sentence of no greater than 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release, and a fine of $250,000. Perez-Fuentes will be subject to deportation upon completion of his sentence. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb and Michael Shea, Acting Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations in Boston, made the announcement. Assistant U.S. Attorney Suzanne Sullivan Jacobus of Weinreb’s Major Crimes Unit is prosecuting this case.

UNDER THE INFLUENCE

On Dec. 4, at 7:08 p.m., a Chelsea Police officer was dispatched to Cross Street and Park Street for a motor vehicle accident with no reported injuries. Upon arrival there were two cars to the right side of the road on Cross Street and Park Street. The officer spoke to both operators and formed the opinion based on his training and experience that operator that caused the accident was operating under the influence of drugs. The officer developed probable cause based on her comments at the scene.

Sandra Pizzano, 56, of Saugus, was charged with operating under the influence of drugs and forging an RMV document.

BREAKING AND ENTERING

On Dec. 7, at 4:31 a.m., an alarm triggered at the Laundry-Wash, located at 14 Everett Ave. It was the third time the alarm had been triggered that night. Upon arrival, a male party was observed running from the area towards Kayem Foods. After a brief foot pursuit, the subject was arrested.

Rolando Arias, 43, of Revere, was charged with Breaking and entering in the night for a felony, possession of burglarious tools, and two counts of malicious destruction of property over $250.

ASSAULTED DRIVER

On Dec. 7, at 9:31 p.m., officers responded to Springvale Avenue on a report of a hit and run accident. The officers spoke to the victim who stated that while operating on Springvale Avenue towards Washington, he was struck in the rear by a male subject in a van. The victim stated he attempted to pull over, when he was struck a second time. At this time, the suspect did pull over and jumped out of his vehicle and began punching the victim’s driver side window. The suspect then jumped back in his car and fled towards Washington Avenue. Officers stopped the vehicle and placed the subject under arrest.

Cesar Garcia, 41, of 3 Springvale Ave., was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, leaving the scene of property damage, and negligent operation.

(17-1269-AR)  

On Dec. 9, at 11:30 p.m., officers responded to Casa Mariachi on Everett Avenue for a report of unruly patrons refusing to leave. The security on scene told the officers that a female patron refused to leave and picked up shot glasses from the bar and threw them at a waitress, striking her in the shoulder. Officers placed the female in custody.

Keyla Flores, 22, of Everett, was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon (shot glass) and disorderly conduct.

Police Log

Monday, 12/4/17

MOrge Nolasco, 31, 234 Bennington St., East Boston, was arrested for marked lane violation and operating under the influence of liquor.

Joanir DeOliveira, 31, 114 Highland Ave. Somerville, was arrested on a warrant.

Sandra Pizzano, 56, 335 Lynnfells Pkwy., Saugus, was arrested for operating under the influence of drugs, forged RMV document.

Samuel Valdez, 41, 50 Dimick St., Jamaica Plain, was arrested for armed & masked robbery and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Wednesday, 12/6

Michael Leiva, 21, 24 Suffolk St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Thursday, 12/7

Rolando Arias, 43, 24 Shirley Ave., Revere, was arrested for breaking and entering for felony, possessing burglarious instrument, malicious destruction of property over $250 (2 counts).

Julie Maskell, 41, 2 Harris St., Revere, was arrested on a warrant.

Luis Martinez, 49, 108 Clark Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Brittany Lopes-Rattigan, 28, 2 Franklin Ave., Chelsea, was arrested on warrants.

Robert DelloFano, 37, 15 Watts St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant.

Stacy Lightell, 43, 10 Jones Drive, Chelsea, was arrested on warrants.

Stanley Jeannis, 40, 21 Conn Ct. Woburn, was arrested on a warrant, distribution of Class B drug, drug violation near school/park, possessing Class B drug to distribute and possessing Class A drug to distribute.

Jimmall Marshall, 27, 45 Fourth St., Chelsea, was arrested on a warrant and distribution of Class B drug.

Henrique Castillo, 67, 195 Chestnut St., Chelsea, was arrested for assault and battery on a police officer and resisting arrest.

Cesar Garcia, 41, 3 Springvale Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for assault with a dangerous weapon, leaving scene of property damage and negligent operation of motor vehicle.

Friday, 12/8

Donne Agogo, 24, 6 Lewis St., Medford, was arrested for possessing to distribute Class B drug.

Robert Soroka, 43, 235 Revere St., Revere, was arrested on a warrant.

Saturday, 12/9

Javier Ortiz, 21, 110 Central Ave., Chelsea, was arrested for equipment violation on a motor vehicle and operating motor vehicle with open container of alcohol, operating with suspended/revoked license.

Rodrigo Yordi, 30, 13 Central St., East Boston, was arrested for disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Sebastian Yordi, 33, 133 Kimball Ave., Revere, was arrested for operating under the influence of liquor, leaving scene of property damage and improper operation of motor vehicle.

Jennifer Portillo, 23, 12 High St., Chelsea, was arrested for disorderly conduct.

Keyla Flores, 22, 10 Fremont St., Everett, was arrested for assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and disorderly conduct.

Sunday, 12/10

Baplo Moncado-Diaz, 27, 200 Governor’s Dr., Winthrop, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

Oliver Arevalo, 33, 815 Winthrop Ave., Revere, was arrested for unlicensed operation of motor vehicle.

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Give Where You Live:Vukovic Launches Buy Nothing Program in City

Give Where You Live:Vukovic Launches Buy Nothing Program in City

By Cary Shuman

Sladja Vukovic.

Sladja Vukovic.

Cottage Street resident Sladja Vukovic is hoping to build community spirit in her neighborhood with a new project called Buy Nothing.

Vujovic is the administrator of the Chelsea Facebook group for the worldwide program in which neighbors give and receive free items from each other such as clothes, household goods, furniture, bicycles – really, anything is on the list.

“Currently we have 32 members in Chelsea,” said Vukovic, who is a realtor in Boston. “There are Facebook groups in many cities and towns in Massachusetts.”

Vukovic is originally from Bosnia and came to the United States in 2008. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and an Associate’s degree in Criminal Justice. She has lived in Chelsea since 2010. Her husband is former Chelsea High soccer star Vedran Vukovic, and they have a son, Banja.

The 31-year-old resident started the Buy Nothing group two months ago for residents in the southern half of Chelsea, spanning from Admiral’s Hill to Washington Avenue. She is looking for a resident to step forward and be the administrator for the northern half of Chelsea.

“Basically our goal is to give where you live,” said Vukovic. “If you have something that you want to give to someone or if you have something you want to lend – like a jacket – you post it on a Facebook page, and if anyone else needs it, they’re going to reply and take that item for free.”

The time period for giving and lending can vary from item to item.

“Let’s say I need to borrow something for a weekend, you can ask for it and someone can volunteer to give it you,” said Vukovic.

Buy Nothing can also provide free services such as lawn mowing, house painting, snow plowing, landscaping or even learning a new language. Vukovic speaks English, Serbian, and Spanish.

“You can’t advertise your business in the program, but if you have a service for free that you want to provide, you can do that,” she explained.

Vukovic is trying to increase the number of members in the Facebook group through marketing and personal contacts with her neighbors.

“Somerville has more than 500 members,” she said. “But they’ve been doing it longer than we have.”

The overall mission of the program, according to Vukovic, is to give items to neighbors and strengthen the bonds in the neighborhood.

“I was looking for groups on Facebook and the Buy Nothing project seemed like a great neighborhood-strengthening group,” she said. “I searched it Chelsea and found out that the city didn’t have it. So I became an administrator and here we have it.”

Vukovic is considering an appearance during the a City Council meeting to help publicize the group.

“My goal is for people to get know about this project,” she said. “I think it’s a great way for people who have something to give, to give it to someone else for free.”

(For more information, please go to Facebook and search for: buynothingchelseasouth,ma)

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Council Sounds Off on Removal of TPS Status by Federal Government

Council Sounds Off on Removal of TPS Status by Federal Government

By Seth Daniel

Jose Iraheta has been at nearly every Chelsea City Council meeting in the last four years.

Even when no one else showed up on cold nights in February, one could count on seeing him there.

He has translated for free to help those who couldn’t speak English, attended virtually every community event, sat next to and chatted up Federal Rese

Resident Mario Caballero of Webster Avenue shares his story about being in fear due to the potential of having his Temporary Protected Status (TPS) rescinded by the federal government. An announcement on TPS is expected in six months. Caballero said he had been in the US under TPS since 1988

Resident Mario Caballero of Webster Avenue shares his story about being in fear due to the potential of having his Temporary Protected Status (TPS) rescinded by the federal government. An announcement on TPS is expected in six months. Caballero said he had been in the US under TPS since 1988

rve Chair Janet Yellen when she visited Chelsea, and spoke up for things he agreed with and things he did not agree with.

But on Monday night, he was there to tell a far different story.

It was his story, and it was a story about how the man who is everywhere in Chelsea could one day in the next six months be nowhere in Chelsea – all due to the recently announced decision by the Federal Government that the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program is no longer necessary.

“I am a recipient of TPS due to an earthquake that happened in my country (of El Salvador) in 2001,” he said, holding back strong emotion. “I feel somewhat selfish to come up here because this directly affects me and it’s hard to talk about it. When I first heard that they had put out a letter saying TPS might be rescinded, it was a really dark place for me and probably everyone like me. I started thinking about an exit strategy. I’ve spent more time in the US than in my country. I came here when I was 12. I went to school here, graduated from college and built a life here and a home here. The thought of having to leave is so incredibly hard.”

Iraheta was one of several TPS recipients that appeared before the Council to call on the body to pass a resolution that asked the federal government not to eliminate the TPS program, which affects legal immigrants from Haiti, Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador who have fled dangerous situations like earthquakes and other disasters.

Many Haitians who fled the earthquake in 2010 are greatly affected. It is estimated that about 340,000 people nationwide have TPS status, but a good many like Iraheta reside in Chelsea.

“This resolution gives me hope and gives others like me hope in this situation,” concluded Iraheta.

Other residents, such as Mario Caballero of Webster Avenue said he is retired, having received TPS many years ago. As a retired man who worked two jobs for more than a decade, he wonders what will happen to him.

“I had no worries at all until I heard this news that TPS could be gone,” he said, speaking through an interpreter. “And just like me, the man who owns the home where I rent an apartment also has TPS. We wonder what is going to become of us. I’ve been on a pension for three years now and my first question is what will happen to my pension and my insurance.”

Councillors voted 11-0 to support the resolution, which garnered a standing ovation from a large group that came to speak on the matter.

Councillor Judith Garcia spoke emotionally about the measure, noting that family members have TPS.

“I know so much how you have contributed to the community and the economy,” she said. “We are breaking families apart. Many of those with TPS have children born here…Expelling residents is breaking up Chelsea…This resolution is a bold and important move. I hope other communities like Everett, Revere and Lawrence will join us. We have six months to really rally and bond together to make our voices heard.”

Councillor Dan Cortell said such decisions in Washington are being made by people who don’t have to look those affected – such as Iraheta – in the eye.

“The people making these decisions at a national level are missing having to look people in the eyes whom they are actually affecting,” he said. “Politicians like Trump aren’t looking people in the ye and understand the ramifications…We cannot sent people back to these places when they are not safe. Change is not going to happen from the top down so it has to come from the bottom up…These are our neighbors and we have to fight for them.”

The resolution won a unanimous vote and was signed by 10 of the 11 members.

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Bishop Ready to Head Back to City Council for Prattville

Bishop Ready to Head Back to City Council for Prattville

By Seth Daniel

Councillor-elect Bob Bishop said it feels good to return to City Hall to represent Prattville on the Council. He will be taking office in January, but has been attending meetings to get up to speed on matters.

Councillor-elect Bob Bishop said it feels good to return to City Hall to represent Prattville on the Council. He will be taking office in January, but has been attending meetings to get up to speed on matters.

The halls of City Hall haven’t changed tremendously since former City Clerk and former Alderman Bob Bishop retired, but things have changed a bit and now Bishop will rejoin the team as a member of the City Council.

On Nov. 7, Bishop one a heavily contested race Prattville’s District 1 over Planning Board member Todd Taylor, gaining the right to represent the district on the Council come January.

“I worked very hard and had a lot of support,” he said after attending Monday’s Council meeting. “Many of my voters came out and I’m grateful for that. My opponent worked very hard too and is a good man. I can’t say one bad thing about him.”

Bishop was an Alderman in the old form of government prior to the receivership era, and also served as City Clerk for 25 years, retiring as the Purchasing Agent in 2010.

“It feels really good to be back up here,” he said. “I was first elected when I was 27 and that was some time ago. I have a good idea of what I’m doing and what I need to do to represent District 1.

Bishop said the district has changed, and that’s something he saw when he went out frequently during the campaign. Many of his long-time voters are gone, he said, and many new people have moved in. He said he did his best to meet as many as he could.

In doing that, he said he learned the biggest concern in the district is rats.

“I have to say the number one concern out there is rats – that’s all across District 1,” he said. “That will be at the top of my list. We’re going to really see what the City offers to help with this and then see if we can’t do more.”

He also said a concern is the dangerous crossing at Revere Beach Parkway, as well as the traffic pattern and configuration at the Parkway and Washington Avenue.

Another thing he wants to do is to find out ways to help the City’s code inspectors – whom he believes are overwhelmed.

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Thank You to Our Veterans

Thank You to Our Veterans

Its was 99 years ago this Saturday, on Nov. 11, 1918, that World War I formally came to a conclusion on the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month.

Americans observed the first anniversary of the end of the war the following year when the holiday originated as Armistice Day in 1919.

The first world war was referred to at the time as “the war to end all wars.” It was thought that never again would mankind engage in the sort of madness that resulted in the near-total destruction of Western Civilization and the loss of millions of lives for reasons that never have been entirely clear to anybody either before, during, or since.

Needless to say, history has shown us that such thinking was idealistically foolhardy. Just 21 years later, the world again became enmeshed in a global conflagration that made the first time around seem like a mere practice run for the mass annihilation that took place from 1939-45.

Even after that epic second world war, America has been involved in countless bloody conflicts in the 72 years since General Douglas MacArthur accepted the Japanese surrender on the Battleship Missouri. Today, we still have troops fighting on battlefields in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Niger, and God-knows-where else.

Peace at hand has been nothing but a meaningless slogan for most of the past century.

Armistice Day officially became known as Veteran’s Day in 1954 so as to include those who served in WWII and the Korean War. All of our many veterans since then also have become part of the annual observance to express our nation’s appreciation for the men and women who bravely have answered the call of duty to ensure that the freedoms we enjoy as Americans have been preserved against the many challenges we have faced.

Although Veteran’s Day, as with all of our other national holidays, unfortunately has become commercialized, we urge our readers to take a moment, even if just quietly by ourselves, to contemplate what we owe the veterans of all of our wars and to be grateful to them for allowing us to live freely in the greatest nation on earth.

In addition, let us offer a prayer that despite the drumbeats of war-talk emanating from Washington these days, a peaceful solution will be found for all of our present-day conflicts before they escalate into a full-fledged war.

If nothing else, Veterans Day should remind us that freedom isn’t free and that every American owes a debt of immeasurable gratitude and thanks to those who have put their lives on the line to preserve our ideals and our way of life.

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MS-13 Member Pleads Guilty to Attempted Murder and Conspiracy to Murder

MS-13 Member Pleads Guilty to Attempted Murder and Conspiracy to Murder

An MS-13 member pleaded guilty Friday in federal court in Boston in connection with a 2014 shooting in Chelsea and a 2015 conspiracy to kill a suspected cooperating witness.

David Lopez, a/k/a “Cilindro,” a/k/a “Villano,” 22, a Salvadoran national, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs through a pattern of racketeering activity, more commonly referred to as RICO conspiracy.

U.S. District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV scheduled sentencing for Jan. 30, 2018.

Lopez was a member of MS-13’s Enfermos Criminales Salvatrucha (ECS) clique, which operated in Chelsea and other parts of Massachusetts. On May 29, 2014, Lopez and co-defendant Daniel Menjivar, a/k/a “Roca,” approached a victim near the Washington Avenue bus stop in Chelsea. Menjivar repeatedly stabbed the victim, and as he was struggling for his life, Lopez approached and shot at the victim. The victim suffered significant life threatening injuries, but survived following emergency surgery.

Menjivar pleaded guilty in   September 2017.

The investigation revealed that in March 2015, members of the ECS clique decided to kill a fellow MS-13 member who they incorrectly believed was cooperating with law enforcement at the time.

Law enforcement intervened and convinced the individual to become a cooperating witness. A subsequent investigation uncovered evidence that the ECS clique sent someone to New Jersey to pick up Lopez, who had fled Massachusetts after the May 2014 attack, so that he could come back to Massachusetts to help kill the suspected cooperating witness.

Lopez is the 23rd defendant to plead guilty in this case.

Lopez faces no greater than 20 years in prison and three years of supervised release. Lopez will be subject to deportation upon the completion of his sentence. He is believed to be in the country illegally.

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Cambridge College Moves Campus to Charlestown

Cambridge College Moves Campus to Charlestown

Cambridge College, long considered a pioneer in adult learning, opens their new campus in Boston’s historic Hood Park (Charlestown), having moved from its former location on Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge.

The new, state-of-the-art campus consolidates the four schools into a single campus in Boston.

“We are delighted to welcome new, returning, and future students to Cambridge College’s beautiful new unified Boston campus,” said Deborah Jackson, President of Cambridge College. “The majority of our students live and work in the Boston area, and our new centrally-located campus will more effectively meet the needs of our busy students while attracting a broader population of new students.”

Located in the heart of Boston’s vibrant Charlestown neighborhood the new campus sits in the original home of the quintessential New England dairy company H.P. Hood and Sons. The bright and expansive campus offers a wide array of student centric amenities including multiple gathering spaces for small group work, flexible classrooms, ample free parking, a bus shuttle service, the CC Store, and the CC Bistro. As they head into their new modern classrooms, students will be inspired by wall quotes from luminary authors and thought leaders, and creative signage paying homage to Boston’s most notable thoroughfares, such as Washington Street and Commonwealth Avenue, will further enhance the Cambridge College student experience.

Located a mere five-minute walk from the Sullivan Square Orange line T stop, Hood Park is easily accessible to communities throughout the Greater Boston and surrounding areas. In addition, the campus is in close proximity to landmark development projects such as Assembly Row and the Schrafft Center. An array of anticipated new projects will provide a vast offering of housing and retail opportunities, green space, restaurants, and other exciting resources to the neighborhood.

Cambridge College’s new unified campus joins a community that has become a mecca for companies leading the charge in healthcare and biotechnology such as MGH Partners, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Visiting Nurse Association of Boston & Associates, Tierpoint, ERT, and Indigo Agriculture, to name a few.

“We’re excited to become a part of this exciting and vibrant Boston neighborhood. We believe that the new Hood Park community affords us the unique and exciting opportunity to build relationships with some of Boston’s most innovative companies,” said Jackson. “We look forward to becoming a contributing neighbor to the community and hope to forge meaningful relationships with our new neighbors, employers and businesses to both support the neighborhood and Cambridge College.”

Cambridge College will host a Grand Opening reception on October 19. For more details and information, please call 617.873.0621 or email officeofpublicrelations@cambridgecollege.edu.

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East Boston Health Center Leads the Way

East Boston Health Center Leads the Way

Last week, the US Senate tried to undo the Affordable Care Act or Obama Care.  This system while it is not perfect and as a matter of fact it is far from the mark, still it provides a safety net for literally millions of Americans who would not otherwise be able to afford any health care.

What a sad commentary it is about our country and our leaders that in spite of our leading medical care that thousands of world citizens come here to use and yet for too many Americans, medical insurance still remains out of reach.  As a result, these same Americans are forced to wait – sometimes too long – to take advantage of our medical care that could save their lives.

What brings this to mind is that on Monday, US Senator Elizabeth Warren was in East Boston to praise the work of the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center. For decades, this health center has been delivering care to many low-income residents who lack insurance but are in need of medical help.  This center has helped thousands to cure a simple disease before it becomes progressively worse and possibly terminal.

Given all the rhetoric that is coming out about repealing or keeping the Affordable Care Act, our elected officials should look at the success of health providers like the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center.  The Center is located in an area that is serving a clientele that is below the national income average and in many cases first generation Americans who are struggling to raise a family and make financial ends meet.  Yet, these same Americans are receiving quality healthcare at a price that they can afford.

It would be too simplistic to say that the model that is now being used at the Center can fit all areas of our country.  However, it can fit many areas that are urban and poor.  If this system works here, why should it not work elsewhere?  The East Boston Neighborhood Health Center model could be one piece of solving the puzzle of affordable health care.

The quote from Boston political legend and former Speaker of the US House of Representatives Albert “Tip” O’Neil who coined the phrase that “all politics is local,” seems very apt with debate going on about the Affordable Care Act in Washington D.C. and Monday’s visit and remarks from Sen. Warren on the success of the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center.

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Police Briefs 07-27-2017

Police Briefs 07-27-2017

BEAT WITH METAL OBJECT

On July 16, a Chelsea Police officer was dispatched to Chelsea Police Headquarters for a report of a past assault. The officer spoke with the reporting party/victim. According to victim, he was in the area of Clark Avenue and Eleanor Street when he was approached by a male known to him. He stated the suspect who he knows grabbed a metal object and began to assault him striking him in the left chest area and left upper arm.

The suspect was later apprehended and placed into custody.

Vidal Flores, 49, of 248 Parkway, was charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and malicious damage to a motor vehicle.

ASSAULTED PREGNANT WOMAN

On July 19, a CPD officer was flagged down by a pregnant female party who was stating that she had just been assaulted by a male and his girlfriend. The victim pointed out a male and a female, who were known to the officer.

The victim identified the two stating, “They jumped me.” The female was placed into custody and the male was summonsed into court for the assault.

The victim was reportedly eight months pregnant.

Diane Valentin, 27, of 10 Forsyth St., was charged with aggravated assault and battery on a pregnant person.

BOTHERING FAMILY

On July 18, a CPD officer was approached by a male party who stated that he was going to his backyard where a group of males were congregating. The men were drinking beers in the rear of a Shurtleff Street address and began to bother he and his young daughter. The male escorted the officer to the area, and upon coming into the driveway, the officer observed a male party well known to him who had his pants down and was about to start urinating in the driveway.

The officer placed the subject under arrest for trespassing. A warrant check revealed the subject was wanted by Immigration and Customs officials.

Rudis Garcia, 45, of Lynn, was charged with trespassing and an immigration detainer.

ROBBED ON BROADWAY

On July 23, officers responded to Washington Avenue at Cherry Street to assist a State Trooper who was detaining two male parties. Upon  arriving on scene the Trooper stated a witness flagged him down and told him their friend was robbed and assaulted by two unknown male parties in front of Chung Wah Restaurant in Bellingham Square.

The Trooper was able to locate those two parties on the corner of Washington Avenue and Cherry Street.

CPD officers furthered the investigation and placed the two under arrest for unarmed robbery and assault and battery.

A warrant check revealed one of the subjects was wanted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials.

Alberto Hurtado, 43, of 18 Tudor St., was charged with unarmed robbery and an immigration detainer.

Raul Romero, 33, of 4 Webster Ct., was charged with unarmed robbery.

ATTACKED         WITH A CHAIR

On July 21, officers responded to a disturbance involving two parties actively fighting at 12 Hawthorne St. Upon arrival, officers separated the parties and spoke with witnesses. One of the persons involved had an arrest warrant and was placed into custody. Additionally, it was learned that he attacked two individuals with a chair.

Jorge Ruiz, 49, of Lynn, was charged with possession of a Class A drug, one warrant and two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon.

BUSTED FOR CRACK

On July 20, members the CPD drug and vice unit placed two individuals into custody after they were observed conducting a drug transaction of crack cocaine in the area 78 Watts St.

Andrew Babigumira, 31, homeless, was charged with distribution of a Class B drug (crack) and conspiracy.

Cesar Gomez, 32, of East Boston, was charged with possession of a Class B drug (crack) and conspiracy.

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