Webster Avenue Pot Shop Gets Planning Board Okay

Webster Avenue Pot Shop Gets Planning Board Okay

A retail marijuana shop on Webster Avenue near the Home Depot is one step closer to opening in Chelsea.

Tuesday night, the Planning Board approved a site plan for a 10,000 square foot retail marijuana facility at 121 Webster Ave. by The Western Front, LLC.

The pot shop still needs additional approvals from the state’s Cannabis Control Commission as well as the local Zoning and Licensing Boards before it can officially open its doors. But local officials have praised the plans for the facility, which is filing for a license to operate under a state economic empowerment provision.

The economic empowerment provision helps provide for minority populations that have faced the brunt of marijuana prohibition punishments achieve social and economic justice, according to Timothy Flaherty, the attorney representing the Western Front team.

The Western Front’s board includes a number of Massachusetts business and community leaders who have addressed social justice issues in the past, including board chair Marvin Gilmore.

Gilmore has a long and storied history in the Boston area and beyond. He co-founded Unity Bank and Trust, was a major real estate developer in the Southwest Corridor of Boston, owned the storied Western Front nightclub in Cambridge, and was awarded the Legion of Honor, among other awards, for helping storm the beaches of Normandy in World War II.

Economic empowerment applications get priority for consideration at the Cannabis Control Commission, Flaherty said.

As for the proposed site at 121 Webster Ave., Flaherty said as a stand-alone building in an area with adequate parking, is an optimal site for a retail marijuana facility.

All marijuana products will be shipped in pre-packaged from a wholesaler, and the facility will feature a host of security measures, from cameras the Chelsea Police can immediately access to a what Flaherty called a mind-boggling number of alarms.

Chelsea police officials were satisfied with the security measures for the building, according to John DePriest, the City’s planning director.

Inside the shop, plans also call for a future workforce development area and a work bar where consumers can gather before entering the retail sales floor.

The sales area will be like “a cross between a jewelry store and a spa,” said Flaherty.

The facility will be open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days per week. There will be a total of about 25 employees, with eight to 10 working at any given time.

“The goal is to hire 100 percent Chelsea residents,” said Flaherty.

All those employees will be trained and certified by the Cannabis Control Commission.

“I’m impressed by the group before us and their commitment to social justice,” said Council President Damali Vidot.

District 3 City Councillor Joe Perlatonda also said he was very impressed with the organization and happy that they are committed to hiring Chelsea residents.

Read More

Council Looking into Keeping Some Marijuana Licenses for Residents

Council Looking into Keeping Some Marijuana Licenses for Residents

Chelsea city councillors are looking at ways in which they can legally find a way to reserve some of the recreation marijuana licenses for Chelsea residents.

Councillor Roy Avellaneda forwarded an order recently to reserve at least two of the four recreational licenses for Chelsea residents, as so many residents have been impacted by the War on Drugs and the prosecution of marijuana possession crimes.

Avellaneda said his order is to amend the current retail marijuana ordinance in similar fashion to Somerville and Boston. At the state level, the Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) signaled early on that it would approve licenses quicker in communities like Chelsea that historically have been heavily impacted by drug prosecution.

However, Avellaneda and other councillors said they have only seen well-heeled investors from out of town turning up to take advantage of that designation in Chelsea.

“The recent rush we have seen by well-funded and politically connected individuals and groups to apply for the available licenses puts those living in communities like Chelsea at a serious disadvantage,” he said. “The goal of the legislation I have introduced is to provide a two-year window for two of the four licenses just for Chelsea residents or a business entity comprised of 60 percent Chelsea residents…I think we would have better host agreements and community benefits offered by an individual or group based from Chelsea than from someone with no connections to this city. Should we allow the money made from these lucrative licenses leave the city? Or should we try to keep that revenue here?”

The Council held a Committee of the Whole meeting on Monday night, Feb. 4, to discuss the matter and try to find a solution.

Council President Damali Vidot said she and Avellaneda and the rest of the Council seem to be on the same page with the idea, but may differ on how to accomplish it.

“My concern at Monday’s meeting and a couopld of other councillor’s concerns were that we could be interfering with a business’s right ot commerce,” she said. “If I own an adult-use shop and want to sell it, I don’t know if we can limit who you sell it to. We don’t want to cut people off at the knees. That will effect investors because they may not want to enter into a place where there are so many limits on their investment…Also, we’re only allowing the rich to get richer. If you live in Chelsea and have the money to buy one of these, you’re obviously already rich.”

She said the marijuana licenses mimic the regulations for liquor stores, and there are no such limits on liquor licenses.

That said, she agreed that Avellaneda has a good idea that needs to be explored and hopefully implemented in some fashion to help Chelsea residents – to empower those economically who have been affected in the past.

Avellaneda said the idea is consistent with the recent 100 percent residency requirement for all new police and fire hires, as well as the affordable housing requirement for Chelsea residents.

“It asks that any new jobs created in Chelsea have a priority for Chelsea residents,” he said. “I doubt Chelsea would lose any opportunities or see a delay in applications because any outsider looking to open in Chelsea would look to partner with a Chelsea resident rather than risk losing a chance at a license by waiting two years.”

Western Front Moving Quickly on Webster

The Economic Empowerment marijuana proposal on Webster Avenue is moving quickly through the local process for a marijuana dispensary at 121 Webster Ave.

Western Front is a minority-owned firm that received the Economic Empowerment designation from the state last spring, and had its community meeting shortly after. The firm plans to open a dispensary and also employ those who have been adversely affected by the War on Drugs – particularly people from the Chelsea. The ownership of the company comes from Boston and Cambridge though. Western Front is scheduled to go before the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) on Feb. 12 at 6 p.m. It is the first ZBA hearing in Chelsea for a marijuana proposal.

Read More

Be Sure to Thank Our Veterans

Be Sure to Thank Our Veterans

Its was 100 years ago this Sunday, on Nov. 11, 1918, that World War I formally came to a conclusion on what is famously referred to as the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month.

Americans observed the first anniversary of the end of the war the following year when the holiday we now know as Veteran’s Day originated as Armistice Day in 1919.

The first world war was referred to at the time as “the war to end all wars.” It was thought that never again would mankind engage in the sort of madness that resulted in the near-total destruction of Western Civilization and the loss of millions of lives for reasons that never have been entirely clear to anybody either before, during, or since.

Needless to say, history has shown us that such thinking was idealistically foolhardy. Just 21 years later, the world again became enmeshed in a global conflagration that made the first time around seem like a mere practice run for the mass annihilation that took place from 1939-45.

Even after that epic second world war, America has been involved in countless bloody conflicts in the 73 years since General Douglas MacArthur accepted the Japanese surrender on the Battleship Missouri. Today, we still have troops fighting — and dying — on frontlines around the world.

Peace at hand has been nothing but a meaningless slogan for most of the past century.

Armistice Day officially became known as Veteran’s Day in 1954 so as to include those who served in WWII and the Korean War. All of our many veterans since then also have become part of the annual observance to express our nation’s appreciation to the men and women who bravely have answered the call of duty to ensure that the freedoms we enjoy as Americans have been preserved against the many challenges we have overcome.

Although Veteran’s Day, as with all of our other national holidays, unfortunately has become commercialized, we urge our readers to take a moment, even if just quietly by ourselves, to contemplate what we owe the veterans of all of our wars and to be grateful to them for allowing us to live freely in the greatest nation on earth.

If nothing else, Veterans Day should remind us that freedom isn’t free and that every American owes a debt of immeasurable gratitude and thanks to those who have put their lives on the line to preserve our ideals and our way of life.

Read More

Marijuana Store, Education Facility Looks at Possible Parkway Plaza Location

Marijuana Store, Education Facility Looks at Possible Parkway Plaza Location

The Western Front company is proposing to locate a medical marijuana dispensary and a marijuana industry training program at the Parkway Plaza off of Webster Street.

A public meeting to hear and discuss the proposal will be held at City Hall tonight, Aug. 9, at 6 p.m.

Attorney Tim Flaherty said that Western Front is led by Marvin E. Gilmore Jr., a World War II veteran who has spent most of his life helping low-income people get into profitable industries so that they could move into the middle class.

Flaherty said the state Cannabis Control Commission (CCC) has already certified Western Front as an Economic Empowerment proposal, which makes it unique compared to traditional proposals. It also puts it somewhat on the fast-track in the state process. Chelsea is designated as a community where Economic Empowerment proposals are allowed due to what is termed an inequitable enforcement of drug laws regarding marijuana in the past.

Flaherty said to be certified, a proposal has to meet three of six criteria, and Western Front met all six.

“This is a very appropriate site we think for this use and complies with zoning in Chelsea,” said Flaherty. “What we will do with the space is we will operate a dispensary on one side and we will operate the other side as a workforce training space. Our business model is to have Chelsea residents and have people previously impacted by the War on Drugs benefitting from this proposal. There are certain types of offenses that disqualify people from being hired by Western Front, but a conviction for possession of marijuana would not prohibit them.”

The proposal at the moment is for a medical marijuana dispensary to operate, but Flaherty said they would like to become a recreational facility if they can get the financing and approvals. For now, though, they will be apply for medical.

The workforce training center will exist to educate Chelsea residents about how to get involved and qualified to work in the burgeoning marijuana industry.

The proposal, Flaherty stressed, is unique in that it is meant to benefit people in Chelsea that have been disproportionately harmed by the War on Drugs in the past.

He said they haven’t signed a Host Community Agreement with the City yet, but he said a standard condition is a 3 percent impact fee. Another 3 percent fee would be imposed as a local sales tax option. Other mitigation could come if the proposal is approved.

Flaherty said they will have 24/7 video and audio surveillance, with steel doors and a security guard on site.

After the community meeting, if there is not major opposition, the proposal would move to a full application with the state. If approved there, the application would come back to the Chelsea Planning Board for a Special Permit.

Read More

Thank You to Our Veterans

Thank You to Our Veterans

Its was 99 years ago this Saturday, on Nov. 11, 1918, that World War I formally came to a conclusion on the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month.

Americans observed the first anniversary of the end of the war the following year when the holiday originated as Armistice Day in 1919.

The first world war was referred to at the time as “the war to end all wars.” It was thought that never again would mankind engage in the sort of madness that resulted in the near-total destruction of Western Civilization and the loss of millions of lives for reasons that never have been entirely clear to anybody either before, during, or since.

Needless to say, history has shown us that such thinking was idealistically foolhardy. Just 21 years later, the world again became enmeshed in a global conflagration that made the first time around seem like a mere practice run for the mass annihilation that took place from 1939-45.

Even after that epic second world war, America has been involved in countless bloody conflicts in the 72 years since General Douglas MacArthur accepted the Japanese surrender on the Battleship Missouri. Today, we still have troops fighting on battlefields in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Niger, and God-knows-where else.

Peace at hand has been nothing but a meaningless slogan for most of the past century.

Armistice Day officially became known as Veteran’s Day in 1954 so as to include those who served in WWII and the Korean War. All of our many veterans since then also have become part of the annual observance to express our nation’s appreciation for the men and women who bravely have answered the call of duty to ensure that the freedoms we enjoy as Americans have been preserved against the many challenges we have faced.

Although Veteran’s Day, as with all of our other national holidays, unfortunately has become commercialized, we urge our readers to take a moment, even if just quietly by ourselves, to contemplate what we owe the veterans of all of our wars and to be grateful to them for allowing us to live freely in the greatest nation on earth.

In addition, let us offer a prayer that despite the drumbeats of war-talk emanating from Washington these days, a peaceful solution will be found for all of our present-day conflicts before they escalate into a full-fledged war.

If nothing else, Veterans Day should remind us that freedom isn’t free and that every American owes a debt of immeasurable gratitude and thanks to those who have put their lives on the line to preserve our ideals and our way of life.

Read More

MassDot Moves Forward On All Electronic Tolling for Tobin, Tunnels, Turnpike

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) Board acted Monday to move ahead with plans to completely demolish Interstate 90 toll plazas by the end of 2017 as a milestone in the state’s progress toward All Electronic Tolling (AET) along Interstate 90 (the Massachusetts Turnpike), the Tobin Bridge, and Boston tunnels.

For Chelsea purposes, State Rep. Dan Ryan said there would be no alteration or changes to the Bridge Discount Program offered to Chelsea residents, whereby they pay $.30 instead of $3 for being a host community.

At Monday’s Board meeting, MassDOT announced that AET will “go live” on October 28.

A series of seven public hearings has been scheduled for public input, with the only meetings in the Boston area being at North Shore Community College in Lynn on Sept. 7 at 6:30 p.m., and another at the Jackson Mann School in Allston on Sept. 14 at 6:30 p.m.

The Board approved toll demolition contracts, reviewed data security and retention proposals and instructed MassDOT to proceed with public hearings on proposed toll rates designed to be revenue neutral and minimize changes in toll charges for current commuters.

“The AET system will improve driver convenience and safety and reduce greenhouse gas-causing vehicle emissions,” said MassDOT Highway Administrator Thomas J. Tinlin. “When toll booths have been removed, AET will allow drivers to maintain regular highway speed as they pass under AET gantries, eliminating the need for drivers to sharply reduce speed and idle in toll booth lines.”

The Board-approved contracts provide that tolls booths will begin to be demolished as soon as AET goes live and all work to remove toll plazas and reconstruct roadways is to be completed by the end of 2017.

While the decision on gantry locations was based on a 2012 study and the decision to implement AET was made in 2014, MassDOT officials have been working with the predetermined gantry locations to make sure rates at the new gantries remain “revenue neutral,” meaning that total revenue generated both on the Western Turnpike (I-90 from the New York border to Weston) and the Metropolitan Highway System will be approximately the same as with current tolls.

Proposed rates will extend discounts for users of Commonwealth of Massachusetts-issued E-ZPass transponders, currently available only at the Weston and Allston/Brighton tolls, to every gantry location including the Tobin Bridge and airport tunnels. The rates being proposed for public review provide that the cost of driving from one end of I-90 to the other for E-ZPassMA users will drop from the current rate of $6.60 to $6.15.

“In developing proposed AET rates and policies, we worked with the gantries’ predetermined locations and considered a series of plans and models to develop a revenue neutral toll strategy in an effort to keep changes in the cost of specific commuting trips modest, within five or ten cents of current rates,” said Massachusetts Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “We look forward to the public’s input on toll charges before the Board votes to finalize rates on October 6.”

Point-to-point tolls may change because of the location of gantries selected by the previous Administration and because there will be 16 gantries with the AET system compared with 26 toll plaza locations now. Under the proposed gantry toll rates presented today, just over half of all drivers would see their tolls either decrease or remain the same and another 20 percent of drivers would see an increase of five or ten cents per trip. Under proposed rates, higher increases would occur on trips that are currently un-tolled, for example, for travel in tunnels headed to the airport or for those drivers in the Newton area where a toll had been removed. The proposed gantry rates will be the subject of seven public hearings and a public comment period beginning after Labor Day.

The Board was also briefed about existing and proposed policies to restrict the usage and retention of data collected by gantries. Current law requires subpoenas for authorities to access driver data, mirroring the existing policies for the Massachusetts E-ZPass system. MassDOT is working with the Executive Office of Public Safety to establish clear policies for the use and retention of AET data. MassDOT is in discussions with public safety officials about the very limited circumstances in which AET-generated “Hot List” or other information could be used in the case of public safety emergencies.

MassDOT officials estimate that the agency will save about $5 million in annual operating costs with AET. The cost of designing and building the physical AET system is about $130 million and toll plaza removal and reconstruction, excluding the Sumner Tunnel, will cost about $133 million.

Read More

Sports 12-03-2015

Red Devils drop holiday tilt with Matignon, 18-12

The Chelsea High football team turned in a valiant effort, but came up short by a score of 18-12 in a Thanksgiving Day battle with Matignon at Dilboy Stadium.

The contest began well for the Red Devils. After the CHS defense forced Matignon to punt on its opening possession, the Red Devils marched 50 yards for a touchdown, capped by a four yard burst into the end zone by sophomore David Bui.

However, Matignon bounced back thanks to a big return on the ensuing kickoff which brought the ball to the Chelsea 30. Matignon then executed a flanker reverse on second down to cover the 32 yard distance into the Chelsea end zone to knot matters at 6-6.

The teams then exchanged punts, with Nick Ieng taking the Matignon kick and racing 64 yards for an apparent touchdown. However, Nick’s fine effort was called back because of a ref’s flag on a Chelsea player for a block in the back. With the Red Devils taking possession at their own 38, Chelsea proceeded to nullify the penalty by marching into the Matignon end zone. Senior captain Dennys Hernandez, an offensive lineman, got the call for the final two yards to make it 12-6 in favor of Chelsea.

“It’s always nice to reward a senior lineman who has put in the work for four years both in the weight room and in the trenches on the offensive line,” said CHS head coach Jack Halas. “Dennys is a great kid, and I’m glad we were able to give him the ball for the touchdown in the final game of his CHS career.”

However, all of the good work of the Chelsea offense went for naught thanks once again to poor coverage on the ensuing kickoff. The Matignon kick returner took the ball all the way to the CHS three yard line, with kicker Henry Lemus making a saving tackle. Still, three plays later Matignon reached paydirt to even matters at 12-12.

The half ended with Chelsea punting on its next offensive possession and Red Devil Luis Jiminez intercepting a Matignon “Hail Mary” pass as the clock wound down.

The second half proved to be defensive struggle. The Red Devils were able to advance only as far as the Matignon 32 in the third quarter, with the drive sputtering out thanks to a mishandled snap on a third-and-five. Matignon then took over and put together its best drive of the day, aided once again primarily by a wide-receiver reverse play that eventually led to a touchdown from the Chelsea three yard line.

With the contest now in the fourth quarter, the Red Devil defense needed to make a stop, and it did, giving the ball to Chelsea at the CHS 46 with about 4:00 to play. The Red Devils appeared primed to seize the momentum. Ieng carried for 22 yards off the right side, Bui ran for eight more yards, and a 12 yard completion over the middle from Mike Rowan to Dashuan Alves gave Chelsea a first-and-10 at the Matignon 16.

However, that would prove to be as close as Chelsea would get to the Matignon end zone, as the drive ended after two incomplete passes. Matignon then was able to take knees to end the ballgame.

“It was a tough one to lose,” said Halas. “Give lots of credit to Matignon. They had a game plan which they executed well. We did not make the key plays or enough plays to allow us to win the ballgame. They made more plays than we did, and they deserved to win the game. They outplayed us.

“Obviously, it was not the way we wanted to send our seniors out on Thanksgiving,” added Halas. “We left too many opportunities out on the field. The big play hurt us badly both in the kicking game and defensively. We had a couple of drives offensively sputter out because of poor execution.”

A number of Red Devils turned in fine performances. Rowan hit on 13-of-18 passes for 71 yards. Jiminez was his chief target with six receptions for 41 yards. Alves grabbed two passes for 15 yards. Ieng lugged the ball 13 times for 74 yards and caught three passes for 12 yards. Bui rushed for 38 yards on seven attempts and had two receptions for three yards to go with his TD. Hernandez had one carry for two yards and a TD.

Defensively, Hernandez was a bulwark with six tackles. Alves and Nelson Hernandez were credited with five tackles each. The duo of Edwin Dubon and Bui made four tackles apiece.

Bruins Beatby Bob Morello

Bruins ‘Go West Young Man’

Using the popular idiom – “the early bird gets the worm,’ the Boston Bruins left a day earlier for their Western road trip, with the hopes of creating a more fitting idiom, such as “the early team gets the win.” Departing a day earlier to arrive in Edmonton on Monday, Boston opened up their stay by one more day, which means that they arrived, relaxed, and had their Tuesday morning practice in Edmonton, instead of Wilmington.

Coach Claude Julien explained, “It just shows how important this road trip is to us. We know there is a difference and a time change and everything else, and that represents a challenge in itself in any normal situation. So we thought coming in a day earlier and getting ourselves acclimated to, I guess, this area here and making the most of it was basically what we’re trying to do here.” It made good sense for the Bruins players to enjoy a solid night’s sleep for the two days prior to last night’s (Wednesday 9:30pm) road trip opener versus the Edmonton Oilers, all the while adjusting to the time difference, and a lengthy airplane ride. Having had a four-day layoff since earning their huge win over the New York Rangers, the question to be answered is: “Does ‘rest’ equal ‘rust,’ or ‘resilience?’

The Oilers roster will be missing two of their top players due to injuries, number one pick, Connor McDavid, and Nail Yakupov. While this matchup looks like an easy win for the Bruins, Edmonton, despite holding the bottom spot in league standings, has had spurts of playing well of late, and will likely not be easy pickings for the Bruins. The Bruins were looking to notch a victory over the Oilers and their general manager, former B’s GM, Peter Chiarelli, to start the three-game road trip, but their focus is on playing the steady, consistent hockey that has earned them their five-game win streak.

Nothing short of a three-game sweep on this road trip will be considered acceptable, or as coach Julien summarized, “We all know these western trips are always tough trips, no matter where the teams are in the standings, I’m really focused on having a good road trip here. A good start to this trip is imperative. We’ve got a little bit of a streak going and we know the feeling of winning. So it’s about doing the right things to keep it going.”

On Friday, Boston will begin a back-to-back schedule with a game versus the Calgary Flames (12/4 at 9:00pm), and finishes up with the Bruins taking on the Vancouver Canucks (Saturday 12/5 at 10:00pm).

This current stretch of five games in eight days will wrap up with Boston hosting the Nashville Predators (Monday 12/7 at 7:00pm), then back on the road to take on the Montreal Canadiens (Wednesday 12/9 at 7:30pm). The B’s left Boston with a five-game win streak which they hope to have extended to eight, at the expense of three Western Conference teams that are currently mired in the bottom six positions of their conference – all out of playoff position. A possible downside is the fact Boston has not faced any of the three teams they will meet on the three game road trip, which means it may take some time for the Bruins to adjust to the new faces and styles.

Read More

Casino Notebook: Wynn Moves Forward With Environmental Certificate Application

Casino Notebook: Wynn Moves Forward With Environmental Certificate Application

Making its first real statement since being charged with continuing the environmental permitting process, Wynn Resorts said on Monday that it has started work on its Second Supplemental Final Environmental Notification Form (SSFEIR) and has officially put a piece of Everett MBTA land in escrow.

The first step in continuing the grueling process for Wynn apparently was getting a grip on the property – which will provide unfettered access to the casino through Everett only and which the MBTA sold illegally due to it not going through environmental review.

Wynn has entered into an agreement with the MBTA to put the 2-acre land sale – which passed papers earlier this year – into escrow so that the state regulators can review the sale. Wynn also said it would provide a full analysis of the sale and the impacts of the sale on the MBTA in its upcoming SSFEIR filing.

“Secretary Mathew Beaton articulated the necessary path for us to resolve a handful of remaining issues. We are committed to following that path and our actions today are a demonstration of that commitment,” said Robert DeSalvio, President of Wynn Everett. “We see no obstacles in meeting the requirements the Secretary has presented.”

  • The Massachusetts Gaming Commission (MGC) and the state Attorney General’s Office announced late last week that they have entered into an agreement regarding lawsuits against the MGC – specifically those filed by Boston, Revere and Somerville. Normally, the AG’s Office would defend any state agency like the MGC, but to avoid any conflicts of interest, the MGC has agreed to retain its own legal team to defend itself in the lawsuits.

The conflict comes due to the fact that the AG’s Office continues to prosecute the cases regarding the land sale in Everett from several individuals to Wynn Everett.

“The Attorney General’s Office and the Commission agree that the AG’s existing criminal prosecution of several individuals associated with the sale of land in Everett for a casino is of paramount importance,” read a statement. “It also is agreed that if the AG’s Office both prosecutes the criminal case and defends the Commission in the local cities’ litigation, it may complicate the full and vigorous presentation of legal issues by both the AG’s Office and the Commission in these respective matters.”

The MGC will hire private legal representation not paid for by the taxpayers to defend itself in the three suits.

  • Wynn Everett will be giving its second update to the MGC this month in what will become quarterly reports to the Board.

While no date has been set just yet, the update will happen in the next two weeks.

As part of the licensing agreement, Wynn and other casinos are called to give full reports on the projects and their statuses every quarter.

  • MGC Commissioner Bruce Stebbins will now be joined in state government by his wife, Katie.

Katie Stebbins was named by Housing and Economic Development Secretary Jay Ash on Tuesday as the new assistant secretary of innovation, technology and entrepreneurship.

Katie Stebbins comes to the Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development with 20 years of experience in city and regional, and workforce and economic development. She served the City of Springfield for 10 years, specializing in environment planning and Brownfield redevelopment, worked for the Cecil Group in Boston, and served as the Western Massachusetts Director for Mass. Mentoring Partnership. Most recently, Katie ran her own consulting practice and was the primary consultant for the Holyoke Innovation District on behalf of the Massachusetts Tech Collaborative. She is a resident of Western Massachusetts.

  • There will be a Trade Union Expo held at Everett High School on Saturday, May 9. All the trades will be there to speak with Chelsea residents about construction apprenticeships and opportunities that will be available during the construction period.
  • MOHEGAN SUN RESURFACES IN S. KOREA

Mohegan Sun officials announced Tuesday morning that, after a few disappointing ventures in America, they have inked an agreement with the Incheon International Airport Corp. in South Korea to develop a gateway entertainment resort on 800 acres of land.

The development is to include hotels, sports arenas, retail/shopping, a casino, an indoor-outdoor amusement park and a private jet terminal.

The company will develop, build and operate the facility, according to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).

It would be the only resort-casino in the world attached to a fixed base private aviation operation. It would also be developed on the ground of the international airport, another rarity.

The Incheon International Airport is the 8th largest in the world and is estimated to serve 45 million travellers per year.

The development is expected to include, but not be limited to the following features:

  • Two-tower luxury hotel complex with 1,000 guest rooms, which will be split between 300 6-star rooms and 700 5-star rooms;
  • The first and only private jet terminal (FBO) in the world connected to an integrated casino resort;
  • More than 18,500 sq. meters of retail, food, art and music entertainment experiences, including a Korean village celebrating Korean food, and music, state of the art motion picture and film studio, and a Native American cultural and arts experience;
  • Over 60 of the most sought after luxury retail brands in the world and over 20 food and beverage concepts;
  • A Korean cosmetics and beauty hub promoting Korea’s dominance in Asia in this area;
  • Entertainment arena with capacity for up to 20,000 attendants for Class-A acts and arena sport events that have become synonymous with Mohegan Sun properties;
  • An Indoor-Outdoor amusement park with 18,500 sq. meters of the latest high-tech amusement rides and more than 12 outdoor attractions; and
  • A 18,500 square meter casino with 250 tables and 1,500 slot machines.

Mohegan Sun is joined in the venture by Miura Holdings Asia, and a final agreement must be made by June 30.

Read More

Chelsea Little League Is Alive and Well and Optimistic about Its Future

Chelsea Little League Is Alive and Well and Optimistic about Its Future

Chelsea Little League used to have three Major League games a night on Diamonds 1, 2, and 3 at the old Chelsea Memorial Stadium. And on Saturdays, the Minor League teams would not only use those three diamonds but Diamond 4 at the old Carter Park.

Great youth leaders like Arnold Goodman, Phil Spellman, Rick Chapin, and Earl J. Ham made Chelsea Little League one of the most popular and respected organizations in the entire region.

In 1971, the Chelsea National League All-Stars, led by a pair of incredible pitchers, Carlos Moreno and Paul Wheeler, nearly led their team all the way to the Little League World Series, losing in the state semifinals in what was then a single-elimination tournament. Manager Bo Morse and coach Bill Plona were the leaders of this unforgettable contingent around which the whole city rallied.

Chelsea would go on to win District 10 titles in 1972, 1973, and 1974, led by such amazing talents as Eddie Richard, David Batchelor, Johnny Amentola, Steve Ovalle, and Dan Ovalle. In fact, David Batchelor would go on to manage the Peabody Western Little League team that qualified for the Little League World Series in Williamsport.

Alas, the enrollment in Chelsea Little League has dwindled although president Michael Glowacki did an outstanding job in leading the league through a tough season.

The league held its awards banquet Monday night at Prince Restaurant in Saugus. Shawn O’Regan is taking over as the new president and is confident that he can lead the league to lofty heights.

We wish Shawn and Chelsea Little League well as it moves forward and continues to provide local youth with an enjoyable and productive introduction to the sport of baseball.

image

Read More